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Alternative Farming Systems Information Center of the National Agricultural Library
Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture


Amaranths For Food or Feed
January 1979 - February 1992

 
 TITLE: Amaranths For Food or Feed
 AUTHOR:  Jane Gates
          Alternative Farming Systems Information Center
          National Agricultural Library
 PUBLICATION DATE:  March 1992
 SERIES:  QB 92-40
 UPDATES: QB 90-29
 NAL Call no.:   aZ5071.N3 no.92-40
 CONTACT:  Alternative Farming Systems Information Center
           National Agricultural Library
           Room 123, 10301 Baltimore Ave.
           Beltsville, MD  20705-2351
           Telephone:  (301) 504-6559
           http://afsic.nal.usda.gov


 ==============================================================    
                                          ISSN:  1052-5378 
 United States Department of Agriculture      
 National Agricultural Library
 10301 Baltimore Blvd.
 Beltsville, Maryland  20705-2351
 
 
 Amaranths For Food or Feed
 January 1979 - February 1992
 
 Quick Bibliography Series:  QB 92-40
 Updates QB 90-29
 
 252 citations in English from AGRICOLA
 
 Jane Potter Gates
 Alternative Farming Systems Information Center
 
 March 1992
 
 
 
 National Agricultural Library Cataloging Record:
 
 Gates, Jane Potter
   Amaranths for food or feed.
   (Quick bibliography series ; 92-40)
   1. Amaranthus--Bibliography. I. Title.
 aZ5071.N3 no.92-40


 About the Quick Bibliography Series
 
 Bibliographies in the Quick Bibliography Series of the National
 Agricultural Library, are intended primarily for
 current awareness, and as the title of the series implies, are not
 indepth exhaustive bibliographies on any given subject.  However,
 the citations are a substantial resource for recent investigations
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 literature of agriculture to the interested user who, in many
 cases, could not access it by any other
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 searches of the AGRICOLA data base.  Timeliness of topic and
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 Citations in this bibliography were entered in the AGRICOLA
 database between January 1979 and the present.
 
 
Search AGRICOLA (http://agricola.nal.usda.gov) to update this Quick Bibliography. 
Use the search strategy and terms located below, plus the extensive AGRICOLA Help 
site to locate recent literature on your subject of interest.
 
 SAMPLE CITATIONS
 
 Citations in this bibliography are from the National
 Agricultural Library's AGRICOLA database.  An explanation of sample
 journal article, book, and audiovisual citations
 appears below.
 
 JOURNAL ARTICLE:
 
   Article title.
   Author.  Place of publication:  Publisher.  Journal Title.   
 Date.  Volume (Issue).  Pages.  (NAL Call Number).
 
 Example:
   Morrison, S.B.  Denver, Colo.:  American School Food Service  
 Association.  School foodservice journal.  Sept 1987. v. 41   (8).
 p.48-50. ill.  (NAL Call No.:  DNAL 389.8.SCH6).
 
 BOOK:
 
   Title.
   Author.  Place of publication:  Publisher, date. Information   on
 pagination, indices, or bibliographies.  (NAL Call
   Number).
 
 Example:
 
   Exploring careers in dietetics and nutrition.
   Kane, June Kozak.  New York:  Rosen Pub. Group, 1987.
   Includes index.  xii, 133 p.: ill.; 22 cm.  Bibliography:   p.
 126. (NAL Call No.:  DNAL RM218.K36 1987).
 
 AUDIOVISUAL:
 
   Title.
   Author.  Place of publication:  Publisher, date.
   Supplemental information such as funding.  Media format
   (i.e., videocassette):  Description (sound, color, size).   (NAL
 Call Number).
 
 Example:
   All aboard the nutri-train.
   Mayo, Cynthia.  Richmond, Va.:  Richmond Public Schools,
   1981.  NET funded.  Activity packet prepared by Cynthia
   Mayo.  1 videocassette (30 min.): sd., col.; 3/4 in. +
   activity packet. (NAL Call No.: DNAL FNCTX364.A425 F&N AV).
   
   
 
                    AMARANTHS FOR FOOD OR FEED                     
    Search Strategy
 
 Set            Items     Description
 
 S1               972     AMARANTH?
 S2             27671     CULTIVAT?
 S3            225590     PRODUCTION
 S4            146495     FOOD
 S5            130349     NUTRI?
 S6             17497     GRAIN
 S7             23244     LEAF?
 S8            197585     CROP?
 S9             15864     VEGETABLE?
 S10             1971     EDIBLE
 S11           535022     S2 OR S3 OR S4 OR S5 OR S6 OR S7 OR      
                    S8 OR S9 OR S10
 S12              438     S1 AND S11
 S13             1433     CYTOKININ?
 S14            27120     WEED?
 S15              642     DYE
 S16              209     RETROFLEXUS
 S17            29244     S13 OR S14 OR S15 OR S16
 S18              291     S12 NOT S17
 S19              266     S18/ENG
 
 
 
 1                                        NAL Call. No.: 79.8 W41
 Allelopathic effects of palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) on
 seedling growth.
 Menges, R.M.
 Champaign, Ill. : Weed Science Society of America; 1988 May. Weed
 science v. 36 (3): p. 325-328; 1988 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sorghum bicolor; Brassica oleracea var. capitata;
 Daucus carota; Allium cepa; Amaranthus palmeri; Seedlings;
 Allelopathy; Growth; Phytotoxicity
 
 Abstract:  Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats. AMAPA)
 residue was incorporated into soil to determine its allelopathic
 effects on the seedling growth of grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.
 Moench.), cabbage (Brassica oleracea, var. capitata L.), carrot
 (Daucus carota L.), and onion (Allium cepa L.). Root and shoot
 growths were equally sensitive to the toxic effects of soil-
 incorporated Palmer amaranth. Growth of 'Grand Slam' cultivar of
 cabbage was 17 to 30% more sensitive than the growth of
 'Sanibel'cabbage. Growth of onion and carrot seedlings was less
 inhibited than either cabbage or grain sorghum. Growth of grain
 sorghum root was severely inhibited by 8000 and 16000 ppm of Palmer
 amaranth in soil and was not affectedby oven dryings other than
 lyophilization. Seedling growth was more severely inhibited by
 thyrsus and leaf tissues than by stem and root tissues of Palmer
 amaranth.
 
 
 2                                       NAL Call. No.: 79.9 W52R
 Allelopathic effects of Palmer amaranth residues in soil on the
 growth of vegetable seedlings.
 Menges, R.
 S.l. : Western Society of Weed Science; 1987.
 Research progress report - Western Society of Weed Science. p. 136;
 1987. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Daucus carota; Allium; Amaranthus palmeri; Seedlings;
 Allelopathy; Phytotoxicity; Bioassays
 
 
 3                                        NAL Call. No.: 442.8 Z8
 Allozyme variation and evolutionary relationships of grain
 amaranths (Amaranthus spp.).
 Hauptli, H.; Jain, S.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer International; 1984 Dec.
 Theoretical and applied genetics v. 69 (2): p. 153-165. maps; 1984
 Dec. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Genetic differences; Alleles; Genetic
 distance; Evolution
 
 
 4                                          NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Aluminum accumulation in vegetable amaranth grown in a soil with
 adjusted pH values.
 Makus, D.J.
 Alexandria, Va. : American Society for Horticultural Science; 1989
 Jun. HortScience v. 24 (3): p. 460-463; 1989 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Vegetables; Leaves; Chemical
 composition; Chlorophyll; Nitrogen content; Mineral content;
 Aluminum; Soil ph; Phosphorus fertilizers; Yield response
 functions; Clay soils
 
 
 5                                       NAL Call. No.:
 aSB320.8.T7U5 Amaranth and celosia, Amaranthus and Celosia
 (Varieties, includes composition and nutritional values, Puerto
 Rico).
 Martin, F.W.; Telek, L.
 New Orleans, La. : USDA Southern Region; July 1979.
 Vegetables for the hot, humid Tropics - United States Dept. of
 Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service (pt.6): 21 p. ill; July
 1979.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tropics; Puerto Rico
 
 
 6                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7398
 Amaranth: Composition, properties, and applications of a
 rediscovered food crop.
 Teutonico, Rita A; Knorr, Dietrich
 Chicago, Ill. : Institute of Food Technologists; 1985 Apr. Food
 technology v. 39 (4): p. 49-61 not consec. ill., charts; 1985 Apr.
 Includes 85 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Nutritional value; Amino acids;
 Carbohydrates; Food processing quality; Food production; Flours;
 Literature reviews
 
 Abstract:  A literature review summarizes and discusses the
 history, composition, and present and potential food uses of grain
 and vegetable amaranth. Other topics include the starch content and
 its properties, the baking properties of amaranth flour and its
 blends, the effects of processing (e.g., heat toasting), and
 potential crop improvements. Eight tables depict the nutrient
 composition of amaranth and its products. (wz)
 
 
 7                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Amaranth flour blends and fractions for baking
 applications. Sanchez-Marroquin, A.; Domingo, M.V.; Maya, S.;
 Saldana, C. Chicago, Ill. : Institute of Food Technologists; 1985
 May. Journal of food science v. 50 (3): p. 789-794; 1985 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Flours; Milling and baking
 quality; Bakery products
 
 
 8                                         NAL Call. No.:
 SB191.A42A5 Amaranth grain production guide.
 Rodale Research Center, New Crops Dept, American Amaranth
 Institute Kutztown, Pa. : Rodale Research Center : Bricelyn, MN :
 American Amaranth Institute,; 1981-9999.
 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Description based on: 1988.  Published Emmaus,
 Pa. : Rodale Research Center, New Crops Dept., 1981-19 ; Kutztown,
 PA : Rodale Research Center ; Bricelyn, MN : American Amaranth
 Institute, <1988->.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Periodicals
 
 
 9                                       NAL Call. No.: 57.8 OR32
 Amaranth is coming back.
 Rodale, R.
 Emmaus, Pa. : Rodale Press; 1985 Jan.
 Organic gardening v. 32 (1): p. 24-27; 1985 Jan. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Food grains; History
 
 
 10                                       NAL Call. No.:
 SB191.A42.A4 Amaranth modern prospects for an ancient crop.
 National Research Council (U.S.), Advisory Committee on Technology
 Innovation, Ad Hoc Panel
 Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press,; 1984.
 x, 81 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 23 cm.  Bibliography: p. 55-58.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seed crops
 
 
 11                                         NAL Call. No.:
 S604.5.E58 Amaranth (pigweed): a crop to help solve the world
 protein shortage. Rawate, P.D.
 New York : Praeger; 1983.
 Environmentally sound agriculture : selected papers, 4th
 conference, International Federation of Organic Agriculture
 Movements, Cambridge, Mass., August 18-20, 1982 / edited by William
 Lockeretz. p. 287-298; 1983.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Developing countries; U.S.A.; Protein sources; Food
 supply; Amaranthus; Crop production; Food composition
 
 
 12                                 NAL Call. No.: SB160.N38 1988
 Amaranth production in Mexico and Peru.
 Early, D.K.
 Portland, Or. Timber Press; 1988.
 Advances in new crops : proceedings of the First National Symposium
 NEW CROPS, Research, Development, Economics, Indianapolis, Indiana,
 Oct 23-26, 1988 edited by Jules Janick, J.E. Simon. p. 140-142.
 ill; 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mexico; Peru; Amaranthus; Crop production; Cultural
 methods; Uses
 
 
 13                            NAL Call. No.: 100 M66 (2) no.2949
 Amaranth, quinoa, ragi, tef, and niger tiny seeds of ancient and
 modern interest.
 Robinson, R. G.
 University of Minnesota, Agricultural Experiment Station
 St. Paul, Minn. : Agricultural Experiment Station, University of
 Minnesota,; 1986.
 23 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (Station bulletin (University of Minnesota.
 Agricultural Experiment Station) ; 2949.).  Cover title.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Grain; Varieties
 
 
 14                                     NAL Call. No.: 500 AM322A
 Amaranth: the once and future crop-- after four conturies of
 obscurity, a former Aztec crop offers modern farmers a promising
 alternative. Tucker, J.B.
 Arlington, Va. : The Institute; 1986 Jan.
 BioScience - American Institute of Biological Sciences v. 36 (1):
 p. 9-13. ill; 1986 Jan. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Production possibilities; Food grains;
 Marketing; Health foods; Nutritional value; Variety trials
 
 
 15                                      NAL Call. No.: 1.98 AG84
 Amaranth--a hot weather spinach substitute (Cultivation, nutritive
 value). Berberich, S.
 SEA-WO AR-BARC
 Washington, D.C., The Administration; Oct 1980.
 Agricultural research - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Science and
 Education Administration v. 29 (4): p. 15; Oct 1980. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 16                                        NAL Call. No.: S79.E37
 Amaranth--a potential crop for southwestern
 Mississippi.
 Igbokwe, P.E.; Tiwari, S.C.; Collins, J.B.; Tartt, J.B.; Russell,
 L.C. Mississippi State, Miss. : The Station; 1988 Nov.
 Research report - Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment
 Station v. 13 (10): 4 p. ill; 1988 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mississippi; Amaranthus; Species; Variety trials;
 Agronomic characteristics; Sensory evaluation; Food acceptability;
 Spinach; Kale; Collards
 
 
 17                                     NAL Call. No.:
 S494.5.B563B56 Amaranths (Amaranthus spp.): potential grain and
 vegetable crops. Flores, H.E.; Teutonico, R.A.
 Berlin : Springer-Verlag; 1986.
 Biotechnology in agriculture and forestry v. 2: p. 568-578. ill;
 1986. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Plant breeding; Improvement; Tissue
 culture; Callus; Protoplasts; Cell suspensions; Regeneration;
 Cereals
 
 
 18                                          NAL Call. No.:
 aZ5071.N3 Amaranths for food or feed, January 1979-December 1989.
 Gates, J.P.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1990 Feb.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculure, National
 Agricultural Library (U.S.). (90-29): 23 p.; 1990 Feb.  Updates QB
 88-07. Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Foods; Feeds; Bibliographies
 
 
 19                                         NAL Call. No.: 80 H41
 Amaranths--ancient, almost forgotten crops may be making a
 comeback. Sauer, J.D.
 Concord: Herb Society of America; 1983.
 The Herbarist (49): p. 105-114. ill; 1983. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 20                                          NAL Call. No.:
 TS2120.A3 Amaranthus: a potential food and feed resource.
 Saunders, R.M.; Becker, R.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1984.
 Advances in cereal science and technology v. 6: p. 357-396; 1984. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 21                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Amaranthus cruentus: milling characteristics, distribution of
 nutrients within seed components, and the effects of temperature on
 nutritional quality (Potential grain crops).
 Betschart, A.A.; Irving, D.W.; Shepherd, A.D.; Saunders, R.M.
 Chicago, Institute of Food Technologists; July 1981.
 Journal of food science v. 46 (4): p. 1181-1187; July 1981.  27
 ref.
 
 
 22                                       NAL Call. No.: 23 AU792
 Amaranthus edulis: an ancient food source re-examined (Minor grain
 crops, feeding experiments with chickens and rats). Connor, J.K.;
 Gartner, R.J.W.; Runge, B.M.; Amos, R.N.
 Melbourne, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research
 Organization; Apr 1980.
 Australian journal of experimental agriculture and animal husbandry
 v. 20 (103): p. 156-161; Apr 1980.  13 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 23                                          NAL Call. No.:
 aZ5071.N3 Amaranthus for food or feed, 1979-May 1987.
 MacLean, J.T.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1987 Oct.
 Quick bibliography series - National Agricultural Library (U.S.).
 (88-07): 12 p.; 1987 Oct.  Updates QB 81-01.  Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Foods; Feeds
 
 
 24                                         NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Amaranthus hybridus: a potential grain crop for west
 Africa. Uzo, J.O.; NURIB; Okorie, A.U.
 Los Altos : Geron-X, Inc; Mar 1983.
 Nutrition reports international v. 27 (3): p. 519-524; Mar 1983. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Africa
 
 
 25                                       NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C33
 Amaranthus hypochondriacus: starch isolation and partial
 characterization. Yanez, G.A.; Messinger, J.K.; Walker, C.E.;
 Rupnow, J.H.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1986
 May. Cereal chemistry v. 63 (3): p. 273-276; 1986 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Flours; Starch; Pastes; Isolation;
 Freezing; Thawing; Digestible starch; Food supplements
 
 
 26                                      NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C333
 Amaranthus: morphology, nutritional value and food
 potential. Betschart, A.A.; Irving, D.W.
 St. Paul, Minn., American Association of Cereal Chemists; Sept
 1979. Cereal foods world v. 24 (9): p. 457; Sept 1979. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 27                                        NAL Call. No.: 450 F55
 Amino acids composition in Amaranthus (Protein, nutritional
 evaluation, Amaranthus hypochondriacus).
 Misra, P.S.; Pandey, R.M.; Pal, M.
 Milano : Inverni della Beffa; 1983.
 Fitoterapia v. 54 (3): p. 135-139; 1983.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English; Italian
 
 
 28                                       NAL Call. No.: 22 IN283
 Annapurna: a new variety of grain amaranth.
 Joshi, B.D.
 New Delhi : Indian Council of Agricultural Research; 1985 Nov.
 Indian farming v. 35 (8): p. 29, 31. ill; 1985 Nov. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Himachal pradesh; Amaranthus; High yielding varieties;
 Characteristics; Cultivation methods; Drought resistance
 
 
 29                                     NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 Assessment of extruded grain amaranth as a feed ingredient for
 broilers. 1. Apparent metabolizable energy values.
 Tillman, P.B.; Waldroup, P.W.
 College Station, Tex. : Poultry Science Association; 1988 Apr.
 Poultry science v. 67 (4): p. 641-646; 1988 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Broiler feeding; Dry matter; Digestibility;
 Metabolizable energy; Amaranthus caudatus; Extrusion
 
 
 30                                     NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 Assessment of extruded grain amaranth as a feed ingredient for
 broilers. 2. Apparent amino acid availability values.
 Tillman, P.B.; Waldroup, P.W.
 College Station, Tex. : Poultry Science Association; 1988 Apr.
 Poultry science v. 67 (4): p. 647-651; 1988 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Broiler feeding; Feed rations; Amaranthus caudatus;
 Extrusion; Amino acids; Availability; Digestibility
 
 
 31
 Availability of calcium from three lettuce (Pisonia Alba) on school
 children. Premakumari, S.; Geetha, G.
 Coimbatore, Sri Avinashilingam Home Science College; Mar 1978. The
 Indian journal of nutrition and dietetics v. 15 (3): p. 67-71.
 charts; Mar 1978.  12 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: Calcium; Lettuce; School children (6-11 years);
 Nutrient utilization; Nutrient intake
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The availability of calcium from tree lettuce
 to school children was studied in comparison with that available
 from amaranthus using school lunch as a medium, over a period of
 three months. None of the children in the three experimental groups
 had a deficiency in calcium intake. As the intake of calcium
 increased, the excretion of calcium through urine also increased.
 The apparent calcium absorption per cent and mean calcium balance
 observed for the groups receiving 5 g and 25g of tree lettuce were
 41:41 and 40:08, and +79 and +144 mg respectively. Both the groups
 had better calcium utilization than the group receiving 25g of
 amaranthus.
 
 
 32                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QP141.A1J6 Bioavailability of iron by 'invitro method' - I - from
 selected foods and effect of fortification, promotors and
 inhibitors.
 Murthy, N.K.; Annapurani, S.; Premjothi, P.; Rajah, J.; Shubha, K.
 Coimbatore : Sri Avinashilingam Home Science College for Women;
 1985 Mar. The Indian journal of nutrition and dietetics v. 22 (3):
 p. 68-72. charts; 1985 Mar.  Includes 6 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Iron; Bioavailability; Cereals; Absorption; Analytical
 methods; Sorghum; Rice; Fortification; Mineral supplements;
 Inhibitors
 
 Abstract:  A diet study evaluated: (1) available iron (Fe),
 with/without Fe fortification in 5 cereals, 3 pulses, and a green
 leafy vegetable (amaranth); (2) 4 cereal-based diets (using rice,
 wheat, ragi, or sorghum, with/without Fe supplementation, or with
 an Fe inhibitor (tannin); and (3) the effect of promotors (ascorbic
 acid; meat extract) and inhibitors (EDTA; phytic acid) on Fe
 bioavailability. Conditions similar to those of the duodenum or
 small intestine were used. High and low Fe availability for
 cereals, were sorghum and parboiled rice, respectively; for pulses,
 were Bengal gram and red gram, respectively; and for cereal-based
 diets, were rice-based and sorghum-based, respectively. Fe
 fortification did not significantly increase available Fe; however,
 the use of meat extract and ascorbic acid, did. As expected,
 tannin, phytic acid, and EDTA reduced Fe availability.(wz)
 
 
 33                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.1 W892
 Biological utilization of B-carotene from amaranth and leaf protein
 in preschool children.
 Devadas, Rajammal P.; WRNDA; Murthy, Nirmala K.
 Symposium on Vitamin and Carrier Functions of Polyprenoids, (1976,
 Bangalore,.
 Basel : S. Karger; 1978.
 World review of nutrition and dietetics v. 31: p. 159-161. charts;
 1978. Includes 7 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Carotenes; Vitamin A; Plant sources of foods; Nutrient
 utilization; Protein; Preschool children (2-5 years); Human
 nutrition research; Fecal analysis
 
 Abstract:  A study was designed to estimate the biological
 utilization of beta-carotene (BC) from 2 BC-rich sources (amaranth
 and leaf protein) in 15 preschool children (ages 3-5), as compared
 to the utilization of standard BC. The 3 different sources of BC
 (40 g amaranth; 8 g leaf protein; 1 ml standard BC solution) were
 given to the children in 3 separate 1-month periods. The amounts
 given carried 1.2 mg BC. Feces were collected during the final 3
 days of each period to estimate BC excretion (and, hence, BC
 utilization from the 3 BC sources). The mean BC excretion during
 the preliminary basal (control) period was 23.2 micrograms/day. The
 mean BC absorptions (corrected for basal excretion) were 61.4%,
 76.7%, and 85.4% from amaranth, leaf protein, and standard BC,
 respectively. Albumin and vitamin A had a significant positive
 correlation, but there was no correlation between vitamin A and
 globulin. (wz)
 
 
 34                                      NAL Call. No.: 64.8 C883
 Biomass heterosis and combining ability in interspecific and
 intraspecific matings of grain amaranths.
 Lehmann, J.W.; Clark, R.L.; Frey, K.J.
 Madison, Wis. : Crop Science Society of America; 1991 Sep. Crop
 science v. 31 (5): p. 1111-1116; 1991 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus cruentus; Amaranthus hybridus; Amaranthus
 hypochondriacus; Interspecific hybridization; Hybridization;
 Heterosis; General combining ability; Specific combining ability;
 Inheritance; Biomass production; Crop yield; Growth rate
 
 Abstract:  To develop a practical foundation for breeding higher-
 yielding grain amaranths (Amaranthus spp.), 32 amaranth accessions
 from the World Germplasm Collection were hybridized to produce 87
 F1's, which were subsequently evaluated for biomass heterosis and
 combining ability in three factorial mating designs. On average,
 interspecific matings of A. cruentus L. and A. hypockondriacus L.,
 in comparison with their parents, produced highly significant (P
 less than or equal to 0.01) biomass increases. When crossed with A.
 cruentus African vegetable accessions as females, male parents of
 both species showed significant (P less than or equal to 0.05)
 general combining ability (GCA). Mid-parent heterosis for biomass
 ranged from -13 to 88% and high-parent heterosis ranged from -24 to
 40%. Late flowering of interspecific matings was associated with
 larger biomass yields. Preliminary experiments utilizing
 intraspecific matings within both A. hypochondriacus and A.
 cruentus gave no indication of high-parent heterosis. Interspecific
 hybridization seems to be a promising way to increase biomass
 productivity of Amaranthus spp. for use as forage, energy
 feedstock, or a vegetable.
 
 
 35                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 C3-C4 intermediate species in Alternanthera (Amaranthaceae). Leaf
 anatomy, CO2 compensation point, net CO2 exchange and
 activities of photosynthetic enzymes.
 Rajendrudu, G.; Prasad, J.S.R.; Rama Das, V.S.
 Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1986 Feb.
 Plant physiology v. 80 (2): p. 409-414. ill; 1986 Feb.  Includes 30
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Alternanthera; Carbon pathways; Carbon dioxide; Gas
 exchange; Photosynthesis; Enzyme activity; Leaves; Plant anatomy
 
 
 36                                          NAL Call. No.:
 QH301.N32 Calcium involvement in plant hormone action.
 Elliott, D.C.
 New York, N.Y. : Plenum Press; 1986.
 NATO advanced science institutes series : Series A : Life sciences
 v. 104: p. 285-292; 1986.  In the series analytic: Molecular and
 cellular aspects of calcium in plant development / edited by A. J.
 Trewavas.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seedlings; Calcium; Growth regulators;
 Inhibitors; Nutrient transport
 
 
 37                                        NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Carbon, nitrogen and water use of C3, C4 and CAM plants.
 Comparative aspects. Gebauer, G.
 Wageningen : International Society for Horticultural Science; 1988
 Dec. Acta horticulturae (229): p. 73-84. ill; 1988 Dec.  In the
 series analytic: Biological Aspects of Energy Saving in Protected
 Cultivation / edited by F. Tognoni and G. Serra. Paper presented at
 a Symposium, September 8-11, 1987, Pisa, Italy.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Atriplex; Kalanchoe; Photosynthetic
 pathway; Transpiration; Stomata; Conductivity; Water use; Cam
 pathway; Nitrogen uptake
 
 
 38                                       NAL Call. No.: TP368.J6
 Carotenoid composition and vitamin A value of some native Brazilian
 green leafy vegetables.
 Mercadante, A.Z.; Rodriguez-Amaya, D.B.
 Oxford : Blackwell Scientific Publications; 1990 Apr.
 International journal of food science and technology v. 25 (2): p.
 213-219; 1990 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Brazil; Amaranthus viridis; Lepidium; Portulaca
 oleracea; Sonchus oleraceus; Retinol; Xanthomonas; Carotenoids;
 Food composition
 
 
 39                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Carrier-mediated uptake of abscisic acid by suspension-cultured
 Amaranthus tricolor cells.
 Bianco-Colomas, J.; Barthe, P.; Orlandini, M.; Page-Degivry, M.T.
 le Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1991
 Apr. Plant physiology v. 95 (4): p. 990-996; 1991 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Cell suspensions; Abscisic acid;
 Uptake; Regulation; Temperature; Ph; Nutrient transport
 
 Abstract:  Abscisic acid (ABA) uptake by Amaranthus tricolor cell
 suspensions was found to include both a nonsaturable component and
 a saturable part with Km of 3.74 +/- 0.43 micromolar and an
 apparent Vmax of 1.5 +/- 0.12 nanomoles per gram per minute. These
 kinetic parameters as well as the uptake by intact cells at 0
 degrees C or by frozen and thawed cells, are consistent with
 operation of a saturable carrier. This carrier-mediated ABA uptake
 was partially energized by deltapH: it increased as the external pH
 was lowered to pH 4.0; it decreased after the lowering of the
 deltapH by the proton ionophore carbonylcyanide-m-
 chlorophenylhydrazone or after the altering of metabolically
 maintained pH gradient by metabolic inhibitors (KCN, oligomycin).
 The carrier is specific for ABA among the plant growth regulators
 tested, is unaffected by (RS)-trans-ABA and was inhibited by (S)-
 ABA, (R)-ABA, and also by the ABA analog LAB 173711.
 
 
 40                                          NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.P53 Changes in carbohydrate and nitrogenous components and
 amylase activities during germination of grain amaranth.
 Balasubramanian, T.; Sadasivam, S.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic; 1989 Dec.
 Plant foods for human nutrition v. 39 (4): p. 325-330; 1989 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seeds; Germination; Composition;
 Carbohydrates; Nitrogenous compounds; Enzyme activity; Amylases
 
 
 41                                       NAL Call. No.: QK710.A9
 Characterisation of leaf fluorescence of sodium-
 deficient C4 plants: kinetics of emissions from whole leaves and
 fluorescence properties of isolated thylakoids.
 Grof, C.P.L.; Richards, D.B.C.; Johnston, M.; Brownell, P.F. East
 Melbourne : Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research
 Organization; 1989.
 Australian journal of plant physiology v. 18 (6): p. 459-468; 1989. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kochia; Amaranthus tRicolor; Leaves; Fluorescence;
 Sodium; Deficiency; Carbon pathways; Kinetics; Emission;
 Thylakoids; Mesophyll; Chloroplasts
 
 
 42                                       NAL Call. No.: TP368.L4
 Characterization of albumins and globulins from
 amaranth.
 Mora-Escobedo, R.; Paredes-Lopez, O.; Ordorica-Falomir, C. London
 : Academic Press; 1990.
 Lebensmittel - Wissenschaft + Technologie; Food science +
 technology v. 23 (6): p. 484-487; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Albumins; Globulins; Amaranthus; Extracts; Leucine;
 Molecular weight; Lysine; Threonine; Gel filtration chromatography;
 Sds-page
 
 
 43                                        NAL Call. No.: 450 AN7
 Chloroplast doublets and differential staining of the cell walls in
 photosynthetic tissues of Amaranthus dubius Mart.
 Dixit, A.
 London : Academic Press; 1985 Jul.
 Annals of botany v. 56 (1): p. 143-145. ill; 1985 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus dubius; Chloroplasts; Cell ultrastructure;
 Cell walls; Differential staining; Mesophyll; Plastids; Leaf
 analysis
 
 
 44                                        NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Choanephora wet-rot complex of Amaranthus cruentus (L.): effect of
 plant density and fertilizer nitrogen on its incidence in
 decapitated direct-sown plants.
 Mnzava, N.A.; Ntimbwa, T.; Mollel, N.M.N.
 Wageningen : International Society for Horticultural Science; 1985
 Jun. Acta horticulturae (153): p. 231-236; 1985 Jun.  Presented at
 the Ninth African Symposium on Horticultural Crops, Mahe,
 Seychelles, July 27-29, 1983. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tanzania; Choanephora cucurbitarum; Amaranthus
 caudatus; Plant density; Nitrogen fertilizers; Interactions; Direct
 sowing; Etiology; Tropics
 
 
 45                                          NAL Call. No.:
 S471.I3J6 Comparative efficacy of soil and foliar application of
 nitrogen through urea yield of leafy vegetable-chaulai (Amaranthus
 blitum, L.) at various seed rates.
 Keskar, B.G.; Bhore, D.P.; Patil, A.V.; Sonone, H.N.; Maslekar,
 S.R. Pune, B.P. Patil; Jan 1981.
 Journal of Maharashtra agricultural universities v. 6 (1): p.
 68-69; Jan 1981.  12 ref.
 
 
 46                                      NAL Call. No.: 442.8 C99
 Comparative morphology of the somatic karyotypes of vegetable
 amaranths and its phylogenetic significance.
 Madhusoodanan, K.J.; CYTOA; Nazeer, M.A.
 June 1983. v. 48 (2); June 1983.
 Cytologia v. 48 (2): p. 237-244. ill; June 1983.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 47                                          NAL Call. No.: 8 T86
 Comparison of indices of plant water status in two (Celosia
 argentea L. and Amaranthus dubius Mart. ex Thell) tropical leaf
 vegetables. Adedeji, F.O.
 San Jose : Instituto Interamericano de Ciencias Agricolas; 1984
 Jul. Turrialba v. 34 (3): p. 387-391; 1984 Jul.  Includes 13
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Celosia argentea; Amaranthus dubius; Plant water
 relations; Field tests
 
 
 48                                       NAL Call. No.: S601.A34
 Comparison of several solid wastes on the growth of vegetable
 crops. Wong, M.H.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier; 1990 Jan.
 Agriculture, ecosystems and environment v. 30 (1/2): p. 49-60; 1990
 Jan. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hong kong; Amaranthus tRicolor; Brassica chinensis;
 Solid waste; Soil amendments; Waste utilization; Heavy metals;
 Uptake; Chemical constituents of plants; Crop yield; Physico-
 chemical properties of soil; Sandy soils
 
 
 49                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322 A
 compositional study of amaranth grain (Potential grain crops,
 protein quality).
 Becker, R.; Wheeler, E.L.; Lorenz, K.; Stafford, A.E.; Grosjean,
 O.K.; Betschart, A.A.; Saunders, R.M.
 Chicago, Institute of Food Technologists; July 1981.
 Journal of food science v. 46 (4): p. 1175-1180; July 1981.  30
 ref.
 
 
 50                                       NAL Call. No.: TX341.E3
 Consumption pattern of vegetables and fruits in Andhra Pradesh
 South India. Pushpamma, P.; Kalpalathika, P.V. Mrudula;
 Rajyalakshmi, P. New York, N.Y. : Gordon & Breach; 1984.
 Ecology of food and nutrition v. 15 (3): p. 225-230. charts; 1984. 
 Includes 5 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Vegetables; Fruits; Meal patterns; Storage;
 Recipes; Preservation
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The consumption pattern of vegetables and
 fruits by rural families of Andhra Pradesh, South India is
 described. The amounts of vegetables in the daily diet were found
 to be very low, as 90% of families surveyed did not include leafy
 and root vegetables. Non-leafy vegetables were consumed daily by
 only 50% of the families, indicating a very low intake of
 vegetables and fruits compared with the recommendations of the
 Indian Council of Medical Research (Gopalan Ramasasbry and
 Balasobramian, 1968; ICMR, 1976). The survey revealed that the
 consumption pattern was based mainly on local as well as seasonal
 availability. Brinjal, ladies fingers, tomato, cluster beans, sour
 greens, amaranth, potato and onion were the most frequently
 consumed vegetables. Generally vegetables were not stored. The
 cooking methods most commonly practised were boiling vegetables
 with spices and/or with dhal and frying. Vegetables were preserved
 by sun-drying and pickling. Banana was the only fruit consumed by
 majority of the families surveyed. (Author)
 
 
 51                                        NAL Call. No.: 450 R11
 Copper deficiency and toxicity in two tropical leaf
 vegetables (Celosia argentea L. and Amaranthus dubius Mart. ex
 Thell).
 Adedeji, F.O.; Fanimokun, V.O.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; Feb 1984.
 Environmental and experimental botany v. 24 (1): p. 105-110; Feb
 1984. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 52                                       NAL Call. No.: 22 IN283
 Cultivation of grain amaranth in the northwestern hills (India,
 Amaranthus spp., germplasm, varieties, yields).
 Joshi, B.D.; INFAA; Mehra, K.L.; Sharma, S.D.
 New Delhi : Indian Council of Agricultural Research; Mar 1983.
 Indian farming v. 32 (12): p. 34-35, 37. ill; Mar 1983. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India
 
 
 53                                       NAL Call. No.: 451 L64J
 Cytology of vegetable amaranths (Amaranthus).
 Madhusoodanan, K.J.; Pal, M.
 London, Academic Press; Jan 1981.
 Botanical journal of the Linnean Society v. 82 (1): p. 61-68. ill;
 Jan 1981. 22 ref.
 
 
 54                                      NAL Call. No.: 442.8 C99
 Decrease in quadrivalet frequency over a 10 year period in
 autotetraploids in two species of grain amaranths (Amaranthus
 caudatus, Amaranthus edulis). Pal, M.; CYTOA; Pandey, R.M.
 Dec 1982. v. 47 (3/4); Dec 1982.
 Cytologia v. 47 (3/4): p. 795-801. ill; Dec 1982.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 55                                         NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Decreased protein utilization in amaranth toxicity and
 its amelioration by the concurrent feeding of dietary fiber in rats
 (Food and C Red No. 2). Takeda, H.; Tsujita, J.; Ebihara, K.;
 Kiriyama, S.
 Los Altos, Calif., Geron-X; Sept 1981.
 Nutrition reports international v. 24 (3): p. 481-497; Sept 1981. 
 22 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 56                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 P5623
 Demonstration of a dual effect of fusicoccin on amaranthin
 production in Amaranthus tricolor L. var. bicolor ruber Hort.
 seedlings. Bianco-Colomas, J.; Bulard, C.
 Paris, Gauthier-Villars; Jan/Mar 1981.
 Physiologie vegetale v. 19 (1): p. 7-8. ill; Jan/Mar 1981.  22 ref.
 
 
 57                                         NAL Call. No.:
 TP373.5.J6 Detection of adultration of the spice poppy seeds
 (Papaver somniferum) with Amaranthus paniculatas (Rajgeera) seeds.
 Singhal, R.S.; Kulkarni, P.R.
 Trumbull, Conn. : Food & Nutrition Press; 1990 Oct.
 Journal of food quality v. 13 (5): p. 375-381. ill; 1990 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Papaver somniferum; Amaranthus cruentus; Dietary fat;
 Squalene; Adulteration; Analysis; Food quality
 
 
 58                                          NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.P53 Development, acceptability and nutritional value of
 weaning mixtures. Gupta, C.; Sehgal, S.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic; 1991 Apr.
 Plant foods for human nutrition v. 41 (2): p. 107-116; 1991 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Foods; Weaning; Millets; Barley; Amaranthus;
 Green gram; Mixtures; Soaking; Malting; Roasting; Protein
 digestibility; Food acceptability
 
 
 59                                       NAL Call. No.: QR53.B56
 Development of an enzymatic procedure to produce high-protein
 amaranth flour. Barba de la Rosa, A.P.; Paredes-Lopez, O. Surrey :
 Science and Technology Letters; 1989 Jun.
 Biotechnology letters v. 11 (6): p. 417-422; 1989 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Flours; Dried milk; Food additives
 
 
 60                                        NAL Call. No.: 450 G28
 Diallel analysis in grain amaranth (Amaranthus
 hypochondriacus L.). VI. Combining ability for developmental
 traits.
 Pandey, R.M.; GEAGA
 Roma : Istituto sperimentale per la cerealicoltura; 1982.
 Genetica agraria v. 36 (3/4): p. 287-296; 1982.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English; Italian
 
 
 61                                       NAL Call. No.: 241 AM39
 Differential tolerances of Amaranthus strains to high levels of Al
 and Mn in acid soils.
 Foy, C.D.; Campbell, T.A.
 Madison, Wis. : American Society of Agronomy; 1981.
 Agronomy abstracts (73rd): p. 176; 1981.  Includes abstract.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Acid soils; Amaranthus; Soil chemistry; Aluminum;
 Manganese; Tolerances; Crop yield
 
 
 62                                         NAL Call. No.: S19.J3
 Differentiation of starch property in perisperm of grain amaranths.
 Okuno, K.; Sakaguchi, S.
 Ibaraki, Japan : Tropical Agriculture Research Center, Ministry of
 Agric., Forestry and Fisheries; 1984 Jul.
 JARQ, Japan agricultural research quarterly v. 18 (1): p. 1-5. ill;
 1984 Jul. Includes 18 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Starch granules; Food grains; Analysis;
 Evaluation
 
 
 63                                      NAL Call. No.: 307.8 J82
 Digestibility and nutritional value of crude oil from three
 amaranth species. Garcia, L.A.; Alfaro, M.A.; Bressani, R.
 Champaign, Ill. : The Society; 1987 Mar.
 Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society v. 64 (3): p.
 371-375; 1987 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Seed oils; Digestibility;
 Nutritional value; Chemical analysis; Food analysis; Rats; Feed
 intake
 
 
 64                                      NAL Call. No.: 381 J8223
 Digestibility and protein quality of raw and heat-processed
 defatted and nondefatted flours prepared with three amaranth
 species.
 Garcia, L.A.; Alfaro, M.A.; Bressani, R.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1987 Jul.
 Journal of agricultural and food chemistry v. 35 (4): p. 604-607;
 1987 Jul. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Amaranthus caudatus; Flours; Protein
 quality; Protein digestibility; Nutritive ratio; Heat processing;
 Rats; Diet studies; Hexane; Liveweight; Body parts
 
 
 65                                          NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.P53 Dry heat popping of amaranth seed might damage some of
 its essential amino acids.
 Tovar, L.R.; Brito, E.; Takahashi, T.; Miyazawa, T.; Soriano, J.;
 Fujimoto, K.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic; 1989 Dec.
 Plant foods for human nutrition v. 39 (4): p. 299-309; 1989 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seeds; Heat treatment; Nutritional value;
 Essential amino acids
 
 
 66                                         NAL Call. No.: 26 L53
 Dry matter partitioning in Amaranthus cruentus (L.) Thell. in
 response to population density (Leaf vegetable pot herb throughout
 Tanzania). Reuben, S.O.W.M.; Mnzava, N.A.
 Leipzig, East Germany, Karl-Marx-Universitat; 1982.
 Beitrage zur tropischen Landwirtschaft und Veterinarmedizin (2): p.
 131-134; 1982.  9 ref.
 
 Language:  English; French; German; Russian; Spanish
 
 Descriptors: Tanzania
 
 
 67                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Early responses of sodium-deficient Amaranthus tricolor L. plants
 to sodium application.
 Ohta, D.; Matoh, T.; Takahashi, E.
 Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1987 May.
 Plant physiology v. 84 (1): p. 112-117; 1987 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Seedlings; Sodium; Sodium
 requirement; Deficiency; Growth rate; Chlorophyll; Photosynthesis;
 Nitrate reductase; Plant metabolism
 
 
 68                                 NAL Call. No.: SB107.K49 1984
 Ecodevelopment of arid lands in India with non-agricultural
 economic plants: A holistic approach.
 Khoshoo, T.N.; Subrahmanyam, G.V.
 London : Allen & Unwin; 1985.
 Plants for arid lands : proceedings, Kew Internatl Conference on
 Economic Plants for Arid Lands, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic
 Gardens, Kew, England, 23-27 July 1984 / editors, G.E. Wickens,
 J.R.. p. 243-265. ill; 1985.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arid lands; India; Amaranthus; Acacia; Biomass;
 Commiphora wightii; Azadirachta indica; Gums; Economic resources
 
 
 69                                        NAL Call. No.: Q184.R4
 The effect of a red leaf pigment on the relationship between red
 edge and chlorophyll concentration.
 Curran, P.J.; Dungan, J.L.; Macler, B.A.; Plummer, S.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Elsevier Science Publishing; 1991 Jan.
 Remote sensing of environment v. 35 (1): p. 69-76; 1991 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Leaves; Reflectance; Spectral
 data; Chemical analysis; Chlorophyll; Plant pigments; Laboratory
 tests
 
 
 70                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QH301.P535 The effect of cold-inhibited phloem translocation on
 photosynthesis and carbohydrate status of source leaves.
 Blechschmidt-Schneider, S.
 New York : Alan R. Liss; 1986.
 Plant biology v. 1: p. 487-489; 1986.  In the series analytic:
 Phloem Transport / edited by J. Cronshaw, W.J. Lucas and R.T.
 Giaquinta. Proceedings of an International Conference, August
 18-23, 1985, Asilomar, California. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Leaves; Phloem; Carbohydrates; Nutrient
 transport; Photosynthesis; Sugars; Translocation; Cold stress;
 Inhibition
 
 
 71                                          NAL Call. No.:
 RJ446.J68 Effect of dietary fiber and starch on fecal composition
 in preschool children consuming maize, amaranth, or cassava flours.
 Hamaker, B.R.; Rivera, K.; Morales, E.; Graham, G.G.
 New York, N.Y. : Raven Press; 1991 Jul.
 Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition v. 13 (1): p.
 59-66; 1991 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maize; Amaranthus; Fiber; Cassava; Balance studies;
 Feces composition; Flours; Starch; Energy expenditure; Energy
 intake
 
 Abstract:  Metabolic balance studies were carried out in young
 children fed diets based on maize, amaranth, or cassava flours and
 in corresponding casein controls. Dietary fiber intakes were 22.2,
 20.5, and 9.0 g/day for the maize, amaranth, and cassava groups,
 respectively. Fecal energy losses at least doubled in all test
 diets when compared with the corresponding controls and could
 generally be accounted for by recovered fiber in the feces. Fecal
 starch was also a significant contributor to fecal energy in the
 cassava group. All cassava fiber was recovered in the feces,
 whereas only 48.4 and 16.3% were recovered from ingested maize and
 amaranth. 2,6-Diaminopimelic acid (DAPA), an indicator of bacterial
 mass, was highest in the cassava group. Expired breath hydrogen was
 highest for those consuming maize or cassava. Resistant starch may
 have been responsible for the high DAPA and breath hydrogen values
 in the cassava group.
 
 
 72                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QL737.L32J6 Effect of feeding amaranthus, sunflower leaves,
 Kentucky bluegrass and alfalfa to rabbits (Includes feed
 composition).
 Harris, D.J.; Cheeke, P.R.; Patton, N.M.
 Corvallis : OSU Rabbit Research Center; 1981.
 The Journal of applied rabbit research v. 4 (2): p. 48-50. ill;
 1981. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 73                                       NAL Call. No.: 64.8 M41
 Effect of fertilizer application on the yield, protein and fat
 content, and protein quality of raw and cooked grain of three
 amaranth species. Bressani, R.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Elias, L.G.;
 Melgar, M.
 Dordrecht : Martinus Nijhoff/W. Junk Publishers; 1987.
 Qualitas plantarum; Plant foods for human nutrition v. 37 (1): p.
 59-67; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Protein composition; Fats;
 Protein quality; Fertilizer application; Yield correlations;
 Cooking losses
 
 
 74                                       NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C33
 Effect of germination on the chemical composition and
 nutritive value of amaranth grain.
 Colmenares de Ruiz, A.S.; Bressani, R.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1990
 Nov. Cereal chemistry v. 67 (6): p. 519-522; 1990 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus hypochondriacus; Amaranthus cruentus;
 Amaranthus caudatus; Seed germination; Grain sprouting; Food
 grains; Chemical composition; Nutritive value; Protein quality;
 Protein content; Cereal proteins; Carbohydrates
 
 
 75                                       NAL Call. No.: TP368.L4
 Effect of germination on the rheological and functional properties
 of amaranth seeds.
 Mora-Escobedo, R.; Paredes-Lopez, O.; Gutierrez-Lopez, G.F. London
 : Academic Press; 1991.
 Lebensmittel - Wissenschaft + Technologie; Food science +
 technology v. 24 (3): p. 241-244; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seed germination; Temperature; Time;
 Viscosity; Shear; Flow; Water uptake; Absorption; Flours
 
 
 76                                         NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Effect of heat processing (popping) on protein
 nutritional quality of grain amaranth.
 Pant, K.C.
 Los Altos, Calif. : Geron-X, Inc; 1985 Nov.
 Nutrition reports international v. 32 (5): p. 1089-1098. charts;
 1985 Nov. Includes 11 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Lysine; Protein quality; Protein foods;
 Food grains; Amino acids; Food composition; Heat processing
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The effect of heat processing (popping) on the
 nurtient composition, amino acid content and protein nutritional
 quality of grain amaranth has been reported. Although popping did
 not affect the proximate composition of the grain, there was a
 significant loss in total lysine content of the protein of the
 popped grain. This loss was more in home-popped grains (36%) (which
 included some amount of heat damaged grains) than in commercially-
 popped grains (25%). The net protein ratio (NPR) of home-popped
 amaranth grain was consistently lower compared to that of
 commercially-popped grain. The addition of 0.25% lysine
 monohydrochloride to the home-popped grains did not improve their
 NPR indicating thereby that despite a significant loss in total
 lysine it was still not the most limiting amino acid. The NPR of
 commercially-popped grains however was similar to that of raw
 grains. The results thus demonstrate that well-popped grains do not
 suffer any deterioration in protein quality as measured by net
 protein ratio. (author)
 
 
 77                                       NAL Call. No.: S587.T47
 Effect of potassium fertiliser on the growth and yield of red
 amaranthus (Amaranthus hybridus).
 Kehinde, J.K.
 London : Association of Applied Biologists; 1988.
 Tests of agrochemicals and cultivars (9): p. 102-103; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus hybridus; Potassium fertilizers; Growth;
 Crop yield
 
 
 78                                       NAL Call. No.: TX501.F6
 The effect of pre-process handling conditions on the ascorbic acid
 content of green leafy vegetables.
 Faboya, O.O.P.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1990.
 Food chemistry v. 38 (4): p. 297-303; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Leafy vegetables; Amaranthus hybridus;
 Corchorus olitorius; Vernonia amygdalina; Celosia argentea;
 Ascorbic acid; Food handling; Food storage losses; Moisture
 content; Nutrient content; Food composition tables; Temperature;
 Solar radiation
 
 Abstract:  Five green leafy vegetables (Talinum triangulare,
 Amaranthus hybridus, Celosia argentea, Corchorus olitorius and
 Vernonia amygdalina) were analysed for their ascorbic acid
 contents. The intersite variation in the values was rather high
 when compared with both the intrasite and the between-sample
 variations. For a particular site, Celosia argentea had the lowest
 ascorbic acid content (181 mg/100 g dry wt) while Talinum
 triangulare had the highest (354 mg/100 g dry wt). In direct
 sunlight, an average of 64.0% of the initial ascorbic acid content
 was lost in 8 h. An open laboratory did not, however, appreciably
 reduce the loss. On the other hand, in darkness, only about 16.0%
 loss occurred within the same period. In a household refrigerator,
 the decrease in the vitamin was almost arrested, as an average of
 only 0.5% loss occurred after 8 h. The patterns of ascorbic acid
 change in both vegetables were similar despite the different
 initial levels.
 
 
 79                                      NAL Call. No.: 307.8 J82
 Effect of puffing on oil characteristics of Amaranth
 (Rajgeera) seeds. Singhal, R.S.; Kulkarni, P.R.
 Champaign, Ill. : The Society; 1990 Dec.
 Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society v. 67 (12): p.
 952-954; 1990 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Amaranthus cruentus; Seed oils; Food grains;
 Food processing; Squalene; Triacylglycerols; Fatty acids; Chemical
 composition
 
 
 80                                       NAL Call. No.: S587.T47
 The effect of seeding rate on the performance of direct-drilled
 Amaranthus. Olufolaji, A.O.; Tayo, T.O.
 London : Association of Applied Biologists; 1988.
 Tests of agrochemicals and cultivars (9): p. 98-99; 1988.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Amaranthus hybridus; Sowing rates; Direct
 sowing; Performance
 
 
 81                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P699
 Effect of sodium application on growth of Amaranthus
 tricolor L. Matoh, T.; Ohta, D.; Takahashi, E.
 Kyoto : Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists; 1986 Mar. Plant
 and cell physiology v. 27 (2): p. 187-192; 1986 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Sodium; Plant nutrition; Nutrient
 contents of plants
 
 
 82                                       NAL Call. No.: QK710.A9
 The effect of sodium nutrition on the pool sizes of intermediates
 of the C4 photosynthetic pathway.
 Johnston, M.; Grof, C.P.L.; Brownell, P.F.
 East Melbourne : Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research
 Organization; 1988.
 Australian journal of plant physiology v. 15 (6): p. 749-760; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kochia; Amaranthus; Amaranthus tRicolor; Chloris
 gayana; Atriplex; Lycopersicon esculentum; Photosynthesis;
 Pyruvate; Plant nutrition; Carboxylation; Phosphoenolpyruvate
 carboxylase
 
 
 83                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Effect of sodium nutrition on the ultrastructure of
 chloroplasts of C4 plants.
 Grof, C.P.L.; Johnston, M.; Brownell, P.F.
 Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1989 Feb.
 Plant physiology v. 89 (2): p. 539-543. ill; 1989 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Kochia; Chloroplasts; Plant
 nutrition; Sodium requirement; Plant morphology; Ultrastructure
 
 Abstract:  Mesophyll chloroplasts from sodium-deficient compared to
 normal plants of the C4 species Kochia childsii and Amaranthus
 tricolor were found to have significantly less stacking in their
 grana. On the other hand, no marked difference of thylakoid
 arrangement between bundle sheath chloroplasts from sodium-
 deficient and normal plants of A. tricolor were observed.
 
 
 84                                         NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Effect of soil salinity and nitrogen fertility on
 vegetable amaranth. Makus, D.J.
 Alexandria, Va. : American Society for Horticultural Science; 1989
 Oct. HortScience v. 24 (5): p. 757; 1989 Oct.  Includes
 abstract.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas; Amaranthus; Ammonium nitrate; Sodium
 chloride; Soil salinity; Nutrient contents of plants; Yield
 components
 
 
 85                                       NAL Call. No.: TX341.E3
 Effect of solar dehydration on amino acid pattern and available
 lysine content in four tropical leafy vegetables. Maeda, E.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Gordon & Breach; 1985.
 Ecology of food and nutrition v. 16 (3): p. 273-279. charts; 1985. 
 Includes 26 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Lysine; Vegetables; Food processing quality;
 Nutritional value; Amino acids; Dehydration; Food composition;
 Solar radiation
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The amino acid pattern in fresh and solar dried
 tropical leafy vegetables were evaluated. There were increases in
 aspartic acid, glutamic acid, valine, leucine and isoleucine
 content. Decreases were observed in lysine and histidine. These
 changes indicate that during solar dehydration of vegetables there
 are complex interactions involving the N-bearing compounds,
 particularly the amino acids. Despite the variable extent of lysine
 destruction in the four vegetables, its content in dried Amaranthus
 leaves was in excess of that in the FAO/WHO reference protein.
 Dried Amaranthus leaves were also rich in all the other essential
 amino acids. Dried Amaranthus leaves can therefore, be used for
 supplementing cereal based diets that are limiting in lysine. Dried
 cowpea, cassava and sweet potato leaves were also rich in essential
 amino acids with the exception of the sulfur containing amino
 acids. (Author)
 
 
 86                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QP141.A1J6 Effect of sunflower oil on the absorption of beta-
 carotene and serum retinol levels in the preschool children. Giri,
 J.; Nandhini, A.
 Coimbatore : Sri Avinashilingam Home Science College for Women;
 1985 Nov. The Indian journal of nutrition and dietetics v. 22 (11):
 p. 323-329. charts; 1985 Nov.  Includes 13 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Diet; Beta-carotene; Bioavailability; Sunflower
 oil; Retinol; Preschool children; Blood composition; Vitamin a
 
 Abstract:  A study determined the extent of beta-carotene (BC)
 bioavailability from green leafy vegetables after addition of
 sunflower oil (SF) to the diets of 70 low socioeconomic, urban
 preschool children (ages 4-6) in India. The results revealed that
 both SF and peanut oil (PO) increased the uptake of BC from
 amaranth, with the latter oil producing a slightly greater
 increase. SF and PO also increased serum retinol by about 2.5-fold.
 The addition of vitamin A to the diet together with the oils
 further increased serum retinol; however, its action was
 independent of the action of the oils in increasing serum
 retinol.(wz)
 
 
 87                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Effect of the extraction of a hemagglutinin on the
 nutritive value of Amaranthus leucocarpus seeds.
 Calderon de la Barca, A.M.; Ochoa, J.L.; Valencia, M.E.
 Chicago, Ill. : Institute of Food Technologists; 1985 Nov.
 Journal of food science v. 50 (6): p. 1700-1702; 1985 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus leucocarpus; Hemagglutinins; Extraction;
 Nutritive value; Protein quality; Protein efficiency ratio
 
 
 88                                     NAL Call. No.: FICHE S-72
 Effect of threshing cylinder speeds on amaranth seed
 germination. Krishnan, P.; Kasturi, P.; Beeson, B.; Berlage, A.G.;
 Weber, L.E.; Kauffman, C.S.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1987.
 American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Microfiche collection)
 (fiche no. 87-6509): 12 p. ill; 1987.  Paper presented at the 1987
 Winter Meeting of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.
 Available for purchase from: The American Society of Agricultural
 Engineers, Order Dept., 2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Michigan
 49085. Telephone the Order Dept. at (616) 429-0300 for information
 and prices.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Grain; Crops; Mechanical harvesting;
 Threshing; Drums; Rotational speed; Seed injury; Seed germination
 
 
 89                                      NAL Call. No.: 381 J8223
 Effect of wilting on the ascorbate content of selected fresh green
 leafy vegetables consumed in Sri Lanka.
 Kailasapathy, K.; Koneshan, T.
 Washington, D.C. : American Chemical Society; 1986 Mar.
 Journal of agricultural and food chemistry v. 34 (2): p. 259-261;
 1986 Mar. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sri lanka; Vegetables; Ascorbic acid; Wilting;
 Centella asiatica; Basella alba; Lactuca sativa; Amaranthus
 gangeticus; Ipomoea aquatica; Moringa oleifera
 
 
 90                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.8 AR22
 The effects of alkali-cooking of corn and supplementation with
 amaranth seed on its deficiencies in lysine and tryptophan
 (Mexico).
 Tovar, L.R.; ALANB; Carpenter, K.J.
 Guatemala : Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nutricion; Dec 1982.
 Archivos latinoamericanos de nutricion v. 32 (4): p. 961-972; Dec
 1982. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English; Spanish
 
 Descriptors: Mexico
 
 
 91                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.8 AR22
 The effects of alkali-cooking of corn and supplementation with
 amaranth seed on its deficiencies in lysine and tryptophan (Rats,
 protein efficiency ratio).
 Tovar, L.R.; ALANB; Carpenter, K.J.
 Guatemala : Sociedad Latinoamericana de Nutricion; Dec 1982.
 Archivos latinoamericanos de nutricion v. 32 (4): p. 961-972; Dec
 1982. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English; Spanish
 
 
 92                                     NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 Effects of feeding extruded grain amaranth to laying
 hens. Tillman, P.B.; Waldroup, P.W.
 Champaign, Ill. : Poultry Science Association; 1987 Oct.
 Poultry science v. 66 (10): p. 1697-1701; 1987 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hen feeding; Amaranthus caudatus; Feed intake; Egg
 production; Egg weight; Egg yolk color
 
 
 93                                        NAL Call. No.: 80 J825
 Effects of levels of photosynthetically active radiation on the
 growth of Amaranthus hybridus and Celosia argentea (Tropical leafy
 vegetables). Fawusi, M.O.A.; Ormrod, D.P.; Eastham, A.M. Ashford :
 Headley Brothers Ltd; Oct 1983.
 The Journal of horticultural science v. 58 (4): p. 555-559; Oct
 1983. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 94                                         NAL Call. No.:
 SB998.N4N4 Effects of meloidogyne incognita on growth and
 nutrient content of Amaranthus viridis and two cultivars of
 Hibiscus sabdariffa.
 Heffes, T.A.P.; Coates-Beckford, P.L.; Robotham, H.
 Auburn, Ala. : Organization of Tropical American Nematologists;
 1991 Jun. Nematropica v. 21 (1): p. 7-18; 1991 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Jamaica; Amaranthus viridis; Hibiscus sabdariffa;
 Cultivars; Growth; Nutrient content; Pest resistance; Meloidogyne
 incognita; Oviposition; Pathogenicity
 
 
 95                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Effects of nitrate application on Amaranthus powellii Wats. I.
 Changes in photosynthesis, growth rates, and leaf area.
 Hunt, E.R. Jr; Weber, J.A.; Gates, D.M.
 Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1985 Nov.
 Plant physiology v. 79 (3): p. 609-613; 1985 Nov.  Includes 28
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus powellii; Nitrates; Photosynthesis; Growth
 rate; Leaf area
 
 
 96                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Effects of nitrate application on Amaranthus powellii Wats. II.
 Stomatal response to vapor pressure difference is consistent with
 optimization of stomatal conductance.
 Hunt, E.R. Jr; Weber, J.A.; Gates, D.M.
 Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1985 Nov.
 Plant physiology v. 79 (3): p. 614-618; 1985 Nov.  Includes 29
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus powellii; Nitrates; Stomata; Leaf
 conductance; Vapor pressure
 
 
 97                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Effects of nitrate application on Amaranthus powellii Wats.. III.
 Optimal allocation of leaf nitrogen for photosynthesis and stomatal
 conductance. Hunt, E.R. Jr; Weber, J.A.; Gates, D.M. Rockville, Md.
 : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1985 Nov. Plant
 physiology v. 79 (3): p. 619-624; 1985 Nov.  Includes 34
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus powellii; Nitrates; Photosynthesis;
 Stomata; Leaf conductance; Nitrogen
 
 
 98                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QK882.A1P4 Effects of photon fluence rate and intercellular CO2
 (carbon dioxide) partial pressure on leaf conductance and CO2
 uptake rate in Capsicum and Amaranthus (Capsicum annuum, peppers,
 Amaranthus hypochondriacus).
 Ramos, C.; PHSYB; Hall, A.E.
 Praha : Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences; 1983.
 Photosynthetica v. 17 (1): p. 34-42; 1983.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 99
 The efficiency of utilizing the iron in leafy green vegetables for
 haemoglobin synthesis by anaemic rats.
 Ifon, E.T.; Bassir, O.
 Los Altos, Calif., Geron-X; Oct 1978.
 Nutrition reports international v. 18 (4): p. 481-486. charts; Oct
 1978.  15 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Iron; Leafy green vegetables; Hemoglobin;
 Rats; Demonstrations (Animal); Anemia
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The iron contents in some leafy green
 vegetables commonly eaten by peasants in the Cross River State of
 Nigeria were largely utilized for hemoglobin synthesis by anemic
 male wistar rats. Between 19.06 and 36.21 percent of the iron in
 Corchorus olitorius, Ocimum basillicum, Abelmoschus esculents,
 Cucurbita pepo, Talinum triangulare, Piper guineense, Telfairia
 occidentalis and Amaranthus hybridus (with values increasing in
 that order), incorporated into an iron deficient basal diet, were
 utilized for hemoglobin synthesis by the experimental rats. Only
 7.70 percent and 11.52 percent of the iron contents in Vernonia
 amygdalina and Marsdenia latifolia, respectively, were similarly
 utilized. The efficiency of utilizing the iron in most of these
 vegetables compared quite favorably with that of FeSO(sub4) iron
 (42.67 percent) as observed in these studies.
 
 
 100                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Electrophoresis as an aid in the identification of various species
 and cultivars of grain amaranths.
 Gudu, S.; Gupta, V.K.
 Wageningen : International Society for Horticultural Science; 1988
 Jan. Acta horticulturae (218): p. 231-238; 1988 Jan.  In the series
 analytic: Twelfth African Symposium on Horticultural Crops / edited
 by K. Waithaka and J.A. Chweya. Paper presented at the Symposium,
 November 24-30, 1985, Nairobi, Kenya.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus; Identification;
 Chemotaxonomy; Isoenzymes; Peroxidase; Esterases; Leucine
 aminopeptidase
 
 
 101                                        NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Evaluation of amaranth as a potential greens crop in the mid-south.
 Makus, D.J.
 Alexandria, Va. : American Society for Horticultural Science; 1984
 Dec. HortScience v. 19 (6): p. 881-883; 1984 Dec.  Includes 22
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South central states of U.S.A.; Amaranthus tRicolor;
 Non-traditional crops; Evaluation
 
 
 102                                     NAL Call. No.: 381 J8223
 Evaluation of food potential, some toxicological aspects, and
 preparation of a protein isolate from the aerial part of Amaranth
 (pigweed) (Composition analyses).
 Hill, R.M.; Rawate, P.D.
 Washington, D.C., American Chemical Society; May/June 1982. Journal
 of agricultural and food chemistry v. 30 (3): p. 465-469; May/June
 1982.  Includes 26 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 103                                      NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C33
 Evaluation of lime heat treatment on some physicochemical
 properties of amaranth flour by response surface methodology.
 Vargas-Lopez, J.M.; Paredes-Lopez, O.; Espitia, E.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1990
 Sep. Cereal chemistry v. 67 (5): p. 417-421; 1990 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Flours; Physicochemical properties; Heat
 treatment; Baking quality; Temperature; Calcium hydroxide;
 Tortillas; Doughs; Ph; Viscoelasticity; Color; Water uptake
 
 
 104                                   NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Evaluation of whole amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) flour, its air-
 classified fractions, and blends of these with wheat and oats as
 possible components for infant formulas.
 Sanchez-Marroquin, A.; Del Valle, F.R.; Escobedo, M.; Avitia, R.;
 Maya, S.; Vega, M.
 Chicago, Ill. : Institute of Food Technologists; 1986 Sep.
 Journal of food science v. 51 (5): p. 1231-1234, 1238; 1986 Sep. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Seeds; Flours; Food composition;
 Infant formulas; Protein quality
 
 
 105                                      NAL Call. No.: S587.T47
 Evaluation of yield components of selected amaranth cultivars.
 Olufolaji, A.O.; Dinakin, M.J.
 London : Association of Applied Biologists; 1988.
 Tests of agrochemicals and cultivars (9): p. 100-101; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Yield components; Agronomic
 characteristics; Cultivars
 
 
 106                                     NAL Call. No.: 442.8 AM3
 Evolution and improvement of cultivated amaranths. IX.
 Cytogenetic relationship between the two basic chromosome numbers
 (Amaranthus hypochondriacus, Amaranthus hybridus).
 Pal, M.; JOHEA; Pandey, R.M.; Khoshoo, T.N.
 Washington : American Genetic Association; Sept/Oct 1982.
 The Journal of heredity v. 73 (5): p. 353-356. ill; Sept/Oct 1982. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 107                                     NAL Call. No.: 307.8 J82
 Extraction and refining of oil from amaranth seed.
 Lyon, C.K.; Becker, R.
 Champaign, Ill. : The Society; 1987 Feb.
 Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society v. 64 (2): p.
 233-236; 1987 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Seed oils; Extraction; Fatty
 acids; Squalene; Bleaching; Food processing; Hexane
 
 
 108                                        NAL Call. No.:
 S605.5.O74 Famine plants: hope for the future.
 Rodale, R.; McGrath, M.
 Emmaus, Pa. : Rodale Press, Inc; 1991 Nov.
 Organic gardening v. 38 (8): p. 50-56; 1991 Nov. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Famine
 
 
 109                                        NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Fiber, nitrate, and protein content of Amaranthus
 accessions as affected by soil nitrogen application and harvest
 date.
 Walters, R.D.; Coffey, D.L.; Sams, C.E.
 Alexandria, Va. : American Society for Horticultural Science; 1988
 Apr. HortScience v. 23 (2): p. 338-341; 1988 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Edible species; Nitrogen fertilizers;
 Harvest date; Chemical constituents of plants; Fiber content;
 Nitrates; Protein content
 
 
 110                                        NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Field evaluation of vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus
 spp.).
 Campbell, T.A.; Abbott, J.A.
 Alexandria, Va., American Society for Horticultural Science; June
 1982. HortScience v. 17 (3): p. 407-409. ill; June 1982.  7 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 111                                      NAL Call. No.: QL750.O3
 Field fat of Amaranthus patulus seeds subjected to leaf-canopy
 inhibition of germination.
 Washitani, I.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer International; 1985.
 Oecologia v. 66 (3): p. 338-342; 1985.  Includes 32 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus patulus; Seed germination; Inhibition;
 Canopy; Dormancy
 
 
 112                                     NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C333
 Food uses of grain Amaranth.
 Breene, W.M.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1991
 May. Cereal foods world v. 36 (5): p. 426-430; 1991 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Food composition; Nutritive value; Protein
 content; Dietary fat; Fiber content; Flours; Cereal products;
 Extrusion; Plant oils; Starch products
 
 Abstract:  In this article, we will consider the general
 composition and the nutritional and antinutritional factors of
 amaranth, followed by a look at the variety of amaranth products
 that has emerged in terms of their nutritional and functional
 contributions as food ingredients.
 
 
 113                                      NAL Call. No.: QK710.A9
 Free amino acid concentrations in leaves of sodium-deficient C4
 plants. Grof, C.P.L.; Johnston, M.; Brownell, P.F. East Melbourne
 : Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization;
 1986.
 Australian journal of plant physiology v. 13 (3): p. 343-346; 1986. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Chloris gayana; Leaves; Amino
 acids; Sodium; Nutrient deficiencies; Carbon pathways
 
 
 114                                       NAL Call. No.:
 QK495.A48G7 Genetic resources of amaranths a global plan of action.
 Grubben, G. J. H.; Sloten, D. H. van
 International Board for Plant Genetic Resources
 Rome, Italy : IBPGR Secretariat,; 1981.
 vi, 57 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  AGP:IBPGR/80/2.  February 1981.  At head
 of title: International Board for Plant Genetic Resources. 
 Bibliography: p. 51-52.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Genetics; Amaranthus; Germplasm resources;
 Standards; Amaranthaceae
 
 
 115                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 EU6
 Genetic structure of landrace populations of the new world grain
 amaranths. Hauptli, H.; Jain, S.B.
 Wageningen : Netherlands Study Circle of Plant Breeding; 1984 Nov.
 Euphytica v. 33 (3): p. 875-884; 1984 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Genetic variation; Breeding aims
 
 
 116                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Genetic variability of seedling emergence in Amaranthus species and
 its correlation with other traits.
 Edema, A.A.O.; Fakorede, M.A.B.
 The Hague : International Society for Horticultural Science; Dec
 1983. Acta horticulturea (123): p. 63-70. ill; Dec 1983.  Paper
 presented at the "Sixth African Symposium on Horticultural Crops,"
 19-25 July, 1981, Ibadan, Nigeria.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 117                                    NAL Call. No.: 442.8 G282
 Genetic variation in outcrossing rate and correlated floral traits
 in a population of grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.).
 Hauptli, H.; Jain, S.
 The Hague, Netherlands : W. Junk; 1985 Jan31.
 Genetica v. 66 (1): p. 21-27; 1985 Jan31.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Genetic variation; Outbreeding;
 Pollination
 
 
 118                                     NAL Call. No.: 442.8 AM3
 Genetics of grain amaranths. I. Mendelian analysis of six color
 characteristics.
 Kulakow, P.A.; Hauptli, H.; Jain, S.K.
 Washington, D.C. : American Genetic Association; 1985 Jan. The
 Journal of heredity v. 76 (1): p. 27-30; 1985 Jan.  Includes 12
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Genetic analysis; Color; Plants; Seeds
 
 
 119                                     NAL Call. No.: 442.8 AM3
 Genetics of grain amaranths. III. Gene-cytoplasmic male sterility.
 Peters, I.; Jain, S.
 Washington, D.C. : American Genetic Association; 1987 Jul. The
 Journal of heredity v. 78 (4): p. 251-256. ill; 1987 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Cytoplasmic male sterility; Hybrids;
 Inheritance; Genes; Cytology
 
 
 120                                     NAL Call. No.: 442.8 AM3
 Genetics of grain amaranths. II. The inheritance of
 determinance, panicle orientation, dwarfism, and embryo color in
 Amaranthus caudatus. Kulakow, P.A.
 Washington, D.C. : American Genetic Association; 1987 Sep. The
 Journal of heredity v. 78 (5): p. 293-297; 1987 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Genes; Inheritance; Panicles;
 Orientation; Embryos (plant); Color; Pigments; Dwarfism; Growth;
 Gene expression; Linkage
 
 
 121                                       NAL Call. No.:
 Z5356.A65S4 The genus Amaranthus a comprehensive bibliography.
 Senft, Joseph P.; Kauffman, Charles S.; Bailey, Nancy Nickum Rodale
 Press, Organic Gardening and Farming Research Center Kutztown, PA
 : Organic Gardening and Farming Research Center, Rodale Press,;
 1981.
 vi, 217 p. ; 28 cm. (Rodale research report ; 81-35). 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus
 
 
 122                                   NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Germination of amaranth seeds: effects on nutrient
 composition and color. Paredes-Lopez, O.; Mora-Escobedo, R.
 Chicago, Ill. : The Institute; 1989 May.
 Journal of food science : an official publication of the Institute
 of Food Technologists v. 54 (3): p. 761-762; 1989 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seeds; Germination; Food composition;
 Color
 
 Abstract:  Amaranth seeds were germinated at a water activity of
 about 0.92 for up to 72 hr. Crude protein, true protein and crude
 fiber were found to increase and fat content to decrease. For 48 hr
 of germination reactive lysine values did not change. At 72 hr, a
 slight decrease was observed in lysine and in vitro protein
 digestibility was similar to the control. During germination Hunter
 color parameters L were lowered and a and b were enhanced.
 Germinated seeds showed a pinky color which appeared very
 attractive for various food uses.
 
 
 123                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 B52
 Gibberellic acid bioassay based on the inhibition of
 anthocyanin production in tomato seedlings (Lycopersicon
 esculentum, Amaranthus caudatus). Khan, M.I.
 Praha, Academia; 1980.
 Biologia plantarum v. 22 (6): p. 401-403. ill; 1980.  5 ref.
 
 
 124                                        NAL Call. No.:
 SB189.A1C4 Glutinous and non-glutinous starches in perisperm of
 grain amaranths (Amaranthus, amylose content, iodine absorption and
 gelatinization). Okuno, K.; Sakaguchi, S.
 Szeged, Cereal Research Institute; 1981.
 Cereal research communications v. 9 (4): p. 305-310. ill; 1981. 
 Includes 2 p. ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 125                                NAL Call. No.: SB160.N38 1988
 Grain amaranth.
 Kauffman, C.S.; Weber, L.E.
 Portland, Or. Timber Press; 1988.
 Advances in new crops : proceedings of the First National Symposium
 NEW CROPS, Research, Development, Economics, Indianapolis, Indiana,
 Oct 23-26, 1988 edited by Jules Janick, J.E. Simon. p. 127-139.
 ill; 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Germplasm; Genetic improvement; Agronomic
 characteristics; Plant breeding; Seeds; Nutritive value; Improved
 varieties
 
 
 126                                        NAL Call. No.:
 S604.5.E58 Grain amaranth: a crop with low water requirements and
 high nutritional value.
 Kauffman, C.S.; Haas, P.W.
 New York : Praeger; 1983.
 Environmentally sound agriculture : selected papers, 4th
 conference, International Federation of Organic Agriculture
 Movements, Cambridge, Mass., August 18-20, 1982 / edited by William
 Lockeretz. p. 299-314; 1983.  Includes 22 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Developing countries; U.S.A.; Amaranthus; Food grains;
 Varieties; Crop production; Water requirements; Nutritional value;
 Protein sources
 
 
 127                                       NAL Call. No.:
 S544.3.C2A4 Grain amaranth: a new crop for California.
 Jain, S.K.; Hauptli, H.
 CA
 Berkeley, The Service; Apr 14, 1980.
 Agronomy progress report.California. University, Berkeley.
 Cooperative Extension Service (107): 3 p.; Apr 14, 1980. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: California
 
 
 128                               NAL Call. No.: SB191.A4S5 1978
 Grain amaranths, buckwheat and chenopods., Rev. (ed.). Singh,
 Harbhajan,; 1922-; Thomas, T. A.
 New Delhi Indian Council of Agricultural Research; 1978.
 vi, 70 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.  Bibliography: p. (62)-70.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthaceae; Buckwheat; Chenopodiaceae
 
 
 129                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QK867.J67 Grain sorghum response to plant residue-recycled iron and
 other iron sources (Postharvest stubble and Amaranthus spp. plants,
 correction of chlorosis). Matocha, J.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1984.
 Journal of plant nutrition v. 7 (1/5): p. 259-270; 1984.  Presented
 at the "Second International Symposium on Iron Nutrition and
 Interactions in Plants," August 2-5, 1983, Utah State University,
 Logan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 130                                      NAL Call. No.: SB91.N48
 Green biomass of native plants and new, cultivated crops for
 multiple use: food, fodder, fuel, fibre for industry,
 phytochemical products and medicine. Carlsson, R.
 London : Chapman and Hall; 1989.
 New crops for food and industry / edited by G.E. Wickens, N. Haq,
 P. Day. p. 101-107; 1989.  Paper presented at the "International
 Symposium on New Crops for Food and Industry".  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Plants; Chenopodiaceae; Amaranthaceae; Fractionation;
 Biomass; Multiple use
 
 
 131                                       NAL Call. No.: 10 EX72
 Growth of Amaranthus hybridus (African spinach) under
 different daylight intensities in the dry season in southern
 Nigeria.
 Eze, J.M.O.
 Cambridge : Cambridge University Press; 1987 Apr.
 Experimental agriculture v. 23 (2): p. 193-200; 1987 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Amaranthus hybridus; Light intensity; Growth;
 Leaf area ratio; Dry matter accumulation; Plant physiology; Dry
 season
 
 
 132                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 AN7
 Growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration in relation to leaf
 area index. Bunce, J.A.
 London : Academic Press; 1989 Apr.
 Annals of botany v. 63 (4): p. 459-463; 1989 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Glycine max; Amaranthus hybridus; Chenopodium album;
 Cultivars; Photosynthesis; Respiration; Growth rate; Leaf area
 index
 
 
 133                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QK358.I53 Heritability and genetic advance in a diallelic of grain
 amaranth. Pandey, R.M.
 Aurangabad : D.S. Mukadam, Department of Botany, University of
 Aurangabad; 1985 Dec.
 Indian botanical reporter v. 4 (2): p. 193-194; 1985 Dec.  Includes
 6 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Amaranthus; Heritability; Genetic gain
 
 
 134                                     NAL Call. No.: 1.98 AG84
 History of amaranth.
 Berberich, S.
 SEA-WO AR-BARC
 Washington, D.C., The Administration; Oct 1980.
 Agricultural research - U.S. Department of Agriculture, Science and
 Education Administration v. 29 (4): p. 14. ill; Oct 1980. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 135                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 P693
 Hydrogen-isotope composition of leaf water in C3 and C4 plants: its
 relationship to the hydrogen-isotope composition of dry matter.
 Leaney, F.W.; Osmond, C.B.; Allison, G.B.; Ziegler, H. Berlin, W.
 Ger. : Springer-Verlag; 1985.
 Planta v. 164 (2): p. 215-220; 1985.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Helianthus annuus; Amaranthus; Triticum aestivum;
 Panicum maximum; Leaf water content; Hydrogen; Isotopes; Dry matter
 
 
 136                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 AM36 In
 vitro culture of grain and vegetable amaranths
 (Amaranthus spp.) (Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus hypochondriacus,
 Amaranthus tricolor). Flores, H.E.; Thier, A.; Galston, A.W.
 Columbus, Ohio, Botanical Society of America; Aug 1982.
 American journal of botany v. 69 (7): p. 1049-1054. ill; Aug 1982. 
 17 ref.
 
 
 137                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Increase in protective activity by delignification of
 cereal dietary fibers against amaranth (Food Red No. 2) toxicity in
 rats.
 Ebihara, K.; Kiriyama, S.
 Los Altos, Calif., Geron-X; June 1981.
 Nutrition reports international v. 23 (6): p. 1139-1144; June 1981. 
 9 ref.
 
 
 138                                       NAL Call. No.: 22 M262
 Influence of N (nitrogen) and K (potassium) on the edible yield of
 Co. and Co. 2 Amaranthus (Varieties, India).
 Subbiah, K.; MAAJA; Ramanathan, K.M.
 Coimbatore : K.K. Mathan; June 1982.
 The Madras agricultural journal v. 69 (6): p. 356-358; June 1982. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India
 
 
 139                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Influence of plant density on edible leaf and seed yields of
 vegetable amaranth following repeated leaf harvest.
 Mnzava, N.A.; Ntimbwa, T.
 Wageningen : International Society for Horticultural Science; 1985
 May. Acta horticulturae (158): p. 127-132; 1985 May.  Paper
 presented at the Tenth African Symposium on Horticultural Crops,
 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, January 16-21, 1984.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tanzania; Amaranthus caudatus; Plant density; Leaves;
 Seeds; Yield correlations
 
 
 140                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QP141.A1J6 Insecticide-induced shifts in the nutritive quality of
 vegetables grown in BHC treated soil.
 Srimathi, M.S.; Karanth, N.G.K.; Majumder, S.K.
 Coimbatore : Sri Avinashilingam Home Science College; 1983 Jul. The
 Indian journal of nutrition and dietetics v. 20 (7): p. 216-221.
 charts; 1983 Jul.  Includes 8 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Hch; Vegetables; Nutritional value; Food
 composition; Nutrients; Chillies; Coriandrum sativum; Tomatoes;
 Amaranthus; Carrots; Tuber; Drugs
 
 Abstract:  A study examined the influence of the most commonly-used
 insecticide, BHC (hexachlorocyclohexane), on certain element
 constituents and on protein and carbohydrate shifts in 6 different
 vegetables. BHC-induced nutrient composition shifts differed for
 different vegetables and followed no particular pattern, whether
 the edible portion was fruit, tuber, or greens. The iron content,
 however, was not decreased, nor the carbohydrate content increased,
 in any of the vegetables tested. (wz)
 
 
 141                                      NAL Call. No.: TP368.L4
 Isolation of amaranth proteins.
 Paredes-Lopez, O.; Mora-Escobedo, R.; Ordorica-Falomir, C. London
 : Academic Press; 1988.
 Lebensmittel - Wissenschaft + Technologie; Food science +
 technology v. 21 (1): p. 59-61; 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Proteins; Isolation; Methodology
 
 
 142                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 IN23
 Leaf anatomy in relation to photosynthetic characters of C3 and C4
 (carbon pathways) plants of Amaranthaceae.
 Ramamurthy Naidu, K.; IPPYA; Das, V.S.R.
 New Delhi : Indian Society for Plant Physiology; 1981.
 Indian journal of plant physiology v. 24 (4): p. 335-344. ill;
 1981.  25 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 143                                        NAL Call. No.: 26 L53
 Leaf and seed yields of Amaranthus cruentus L. in relation to
 population pressure.
 Mnzava, N.A.; BTLTA; Reuben, S.O.W.M.
 Leipzig, East Ger. : Karl-Marx-Universitat; 1982.
 Beitrage zur tropischen Landwirtschaft und Veterinarmedizin v. 20
 (3): p. 277-282. ill; 1982.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English; French; German; Russian; Spanish
 
 
 144                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QK882.A1P4 Leaf photosynthetic CO2 exchange rates in light and CO2
 enriched environments.
 Hesketh, J.D.; Woolley, J.T.; Peters, D.B.
 Praha : Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences; 1984.
 Photosynthetica v. 18 (4): p. 536-540; 1984.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Glycine max; Helianthus annuus; Gossypium hirsutum;
 Abutilon theophrasti; Amaranthus hybridus; Carbon dioxide; Gas
 exchange; Light; Leaves
 
 
 145                                       NAL Call. No.: QK1.I48
 Leaf proteinase and nitrate reductase activities in relation to
 grain protein levels and grain yield in four species of grain
 amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus, Amaranthus caudatus,
 Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus edulis).
 Ramamurthy Naidu, K.; PISBA; Seethambaram, Y.; Rama Das, V.S.
 Bangalore : The Academy; Oct 1982.
 Proceedings : Plant sciences - Indian Academy of Sciences v. 91
 (5): p. 433-441; Oct 1982.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 146                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QH574.A42 Leaf variations in Amaranthus paniculatus by gamma
 irradiation. Krishna, V.S.; Bhalla, J.K.
 New Delhi, Hindasia Publishers; 1978 (pub. 1981).
 Perspectives in cytology and genetics v. 3: p. 553-554. 1 plate;
 1978 (pub. 1981).  Includes 6 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 147                                      NAL Call. No.: 410 J272
 Leaf-canopy inhibition of germination as a mechanism for the
 disappearance of Amaranthus patulus Bertol. in the second year of
 a secondary succession (Annual).
 Washitani, I.; Saeki, T.
 Matsumoto : Ecological Society of Japan; Mar 1984.
 Japanese journal of ecology v. 34 (1): p. 55-61; Mar 1984. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan
 
 
 148                                      NAL Call. No.: TX341.E3
 Legacy of the chameleon: Edible wild plants in the kin[g]dom of
 Swaziland, southern Africa. Cultural, ecological, nutritional
 study. Part II-Demographics, species availability and dietary use,
 analysis by ecological zone.
 Ogle, Britta Mathilda; Grivetti, Louis Evan
 New York, N.Y. : Gordon & Breach; 1985.
 Ecology of food and nutrition v. 17 (1): p. 1-30. ill., charts;
 1985. Includes 6 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Swaziland; Food habits; Food consumption; Demography;
 Adults; Children; Diet studies; Amaranthus; Bidens; Corchorus
 
 Abstract:  Extract: This paper, the second of four, presents
 demographic characteristics for 211 adults and 140 school children
 surveyed in four ecological zones in the Kingdom of Swaziland. It
 identifies edible species recognized and consumed, and concludes
 with an analysis of edible plant use by ecological zone. Swaziland
 is culturally homogeneous: 90% of persons interviewed were ethnic
 Swazi; 46% had no formal education; 60% of adults were born or had
 lived for more than 13 years at their present homestead in a
 specific ecological zone. All respondents consumed wild plants; 11%
 never purchased food. More older respondents occupied the Highveld;
 more younger Swazi Middleveld and Lowveld. Most land was cultivated
 at Middleveld sites. Food production varied significantly by
 ecological zone; most maize was produced in the Highveld. Adults
 reported a range of edible species (9-90) in each of four
 ecological zones; adults ate, on average, ten more species than
 school children. Most prominently consumed edible leaves were from
 the genera Amaranthus, Bidens and Corchorus. More than 200 edible
 species are identified taxonomically. Recognition and use of each
 species by adults and school children is compared. Wild fruits were
 more commonly associated with school children. Traditional edible
 species once associated with the Middleveld have declined in
 numbers due to intensive agricultural development. (author)
 
 
 149                                         NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.P53 Limiting amino acids in raw and processed amaranth grain
 protein from biological tests.
 Bressani, R.; Elias, L.G.; Garcia-Soto, A.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic; 1989 Sep.
 Plant foods for human nutrition v. 39 (3): p. 223-234; 1989 Sep. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Protein quality; Limiting amino
 acids; Food processing; Nutrient retention; Raw foods; Rats
 
 
 150                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Lipids in amaranths.
 Lorenz, K.; Hwang, Y.S.
 Los Altos, Calif. : Geron-X, Inc; 1985 Jan.
 Nutrition reports international v. 31 (1): p. 83-89. ill; 1985 Jan. 
 Includes 17 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Composition; Lipids
 
 
 151                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.8 J825
 Mechanisms of adverse effect of amaranth feeding in the rat.
 Kimura, T.; JNSVA; Hasegawa, K.; Imanura, H.; Yoshida, A. Tokyo :
 Center for Academic Publications Japan; 1983.
 Journal of nutritional science and vitaminology v. 29 (2): p.
 153-159; 1983. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 152                                      NAL Call. No.: 385 AG8B
 Methoxy-1,4-benzoquinone and methyl gallate, inhibitory factors of
 betacyanin synthesis in Amaranthus (caudatus), from (kaki)
 persimmon fruits. Hayashi, H.; Koshimizu, K.
 Tokyo, Nippon Nogei Kagaku Kai; Jan 1979.
 Agricultural and biological chemistry v. 43 (1): p. 113-116. ill;
 Jan 1979. 23 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 153                                     NAL Call. No.: 100 AR42F A
 mid-summer crop for fresh greens or canning--vegetable amaranth
 (Field performance and nutrient content).
 Makus, D.J.; Davis, D.R.
 Fayetteville, Ark. : The Station; May/June 1984.
 Arkansas farm research - Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station
 v. 33 (3): p. 10; May/June 1984. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 154                                   NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Morphological studies on Amaranthus cruentus (Potential grain
 crops). Irving, D.W.; Betschart, A.A.; Saunders, R.M. Chicago,
 Institute of Food Technologists; July 1981.
 Journal of food science v. 46 (4): p. 1170-1174; July 1981.  11
 ref.
 
 
 155                                        NAL Call. No.: 26 L53
 Multivariate studies of the variability in cultivated
 amaranths. Fatokun, C.A.
 Leipzig, East Ger. : Karl-Marx-Universitat; 1985.
 Beitrage zur tropischen Landwirtschaft und Veterinarmedizin v. 23
 (3): p. 267-275; 1985.  Includes statistical data.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Amaranthus; Cultivars; Genetic variation;
 Multivariate analysis; Numerical taxonomy
 
 
 156                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 IN23 A
 new amaranthus for clipping (Green leafy vegetables). Kader
 Mohideen, M.; INHOA; Shanmugavelu, K.G.; Muthukrishnan, C.R. New
 Delhi : Indian Council of Agricultural Research; Oct/Dec 1982.
 Indian horticulture v. 27 (3): p. 17-18. ill; Oct/Dec 1982.
 
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 157                                NAL Call. No.: SB160.N38 1988
 New crops in the U.S. National Germplasm System.
 Shands, H.L.; White, G.A.
 Portland, Or. Timber Press; 1988.
 Advances in new crops : proceedings of the First National Symposium
 NEW CROPS, Research, Development, Economics, Indianapolis, Indiana,
 Oct 23-26, 1988 edited by Jules Janick, J.E. Simon. p. 70-75. maps;
 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Amaranthus; Crambe; Parthenium; Limnanthes;
 Stokesia; Vernonia; Hibiscus; Germplasm releases; Genetic
 improvement; New products
 
 
 158                                       NAL Call. No.:
 TX392.A1V44 The new old grains.
 Barrett, M.
 New York, N.Y. : Vegetarian Life & Times; 1986 Jan.
 Vegetarian times (101): p. 28-31, 51. ill; 1986 Jan. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Food grains; Amaranthus; Maize; Buckwheat; Rice;
 Nutrient contents; Consumption patterns
 
 Abstract:  Grains, historically a worldwide staple, are once again
 gaining popularity as essential to a healthy diet. Some whole
 grains, in fact, are becoming quite chic and turning up in trendy
 gourmet shops. Amaranth, quinoa, blue corn and exotic rices are
 being prized for their textures, unique flavors and superior
 nutritional quality in the grain family. Another more familiar
 grain, buckwheat, is being revived as a versatile breakfast food.
 In addition to taste and other desirable features, most of the
 grains can be cultivated in sparse areas; preserving diversity of
 the vegetable kingdom is necessary for preserving plant proteins to
 sustain a world without hunger.(jd-b)
 
 
 159                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.9 N953
 New plants and plant products as food.
 Guenault, Bernard
 Cambridge : Cambridge University Press; 1985 Feb.
 The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society v. 44 (1): p. 31-35; 1985
 Feb. Includes 15 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wild plants; Food production; Food supply; Protein
 quality; Food processing quality; Food technology; Literature
 reviews
 
 Abstract:  A literature review examines the potential of new plants
 and plant production as food. New nutritious plants, plant protein
 extracts from lucerne, tobacco and soybean, and the development and
 application of new food technologies are discussed. Plant species
 considered include triticale (a wheat-rye cereal hybrid, lupins,
 chick pea, wing bean, evening primrose, Chinese cabbage, Japanese
 chives, sweet corn, miners' lettuce, tiger-nut, amaranth, and "old-
 fashioned" crops as unconventional foods (buckwheat, spelt, etc).
 (wz)
 
 
 160
 Nitrate-nitrite, vitamin C and in-vitro methemoglobin formation
 from some vegetables.
 Okiei, Wesley; Adamson, Ishola
 Los Altos, Calif., Geron-X; Feb 1979.
 Nutrition reports international v. 19 (2): p. 241-248. ill.,
 charts; Feb 1979.  20 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: Nitrates; Nitrites; Ascorbic acid; Hemoglobin;
 Vegetables; Baby foods
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The levels of nitrate were beyond the
 recommended 300 ppm in six vegetables, namely: Celosia sp, Lactuca
 sativa, Amaranthus hybridus, Brassica oleracea variety acephala,
 Talinum sp, Spinacia oleracea. Minute quantities of nitrite were
 detected in Celosia sp and Daucus carota. With accompanying high
 concentration of Vitamin C present in Celosia sp, this vegetable
 may be a potential source of nitrite in foods. Effect of cooking
 caused less than 25 percent reduction in nitrate-nitrite cont
 
 
 161                                      NAL Call. No.: S612.I49 A
 note on some promising neglected crops in Upper Luni Basin (western
 Rajasthan).
 Kolarker, A.S.; Singh, N.; Shankarnarayan, K.A.
 Jodhpur : The Society; 1987 Jan.
 Transactions of Indian Society of Desert Technology and University
 Centre of Desert Studies v. 12 (1): p. 13-21; 1987 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rajasthan; Amaranthus paniculatus; Hibiscus
 cannabinus; Plantago ovata; Soil cultivation; Semiarid zones; Plant
 production; Farm surveys; Plant production
 
 
 162                                      NAL Call. No.: TX501.F6 A
 note on the nutritive value of amaranth seeds
 (Amaranthus hybrids). Osuntogun, A.B.; Oke, O.L.
 1983. v. 12 (4); 1983.
 Food chemistry v. 12 (4): p. 287-289; 1983.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 163                                      NAL Call. No.: TX501.F6
 Nutrient contents and antinutritional factors in
 conventional and non-conventional leafy vegetables.
 Gupta, K.; Barat, G.K.; Wagle, D.S.; Chawla, H.K.L.
 Essex : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1989.
 Food chemistry v. 31 (2): p. 105-116. charts; 1989.  Includes 41
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Vegetables; Novel foods; Nutrient contents;
 Proximate analysis; Phytate; Saponins; Oxalates; Phenols; Trypsin
 inhibitors; Nitrates
 
 Abstract:  The nutritional value and antinutritional factors of
 some selected Indian green leafy vegetables were determined. These
 vegetables were amaranth, colocasia, drumstick, fenugreek, neem and
 pumpkin. The vegetables were analyzed for protein and mineral
 content and for several antinutritional factors, including
 phytate/oxalate, nitrate, phenols, saponins and trypsin
 inhibitors.
 
 
 164                                       NAL Call. No.: 26 T754
 Nutrients, carotenoids and mineral compositions of the leaf
 vegetables Amaranthus viridis L. and Amaranthus caudatus L. Ezeala,
 D.O.
 Guildford : Butterworth Scientific; 1985 Apr.
 Tropical agriculture v. 62 (2): p. 95-96; 1985 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus viridis; Nutrients;
 Carotenoids; Mineral content
 
 
 165                                      NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C33
 Nutritional and functional characteristics of extrusion-cooked
 amaranth flour.
 Mendoza M, C.; Bressani, R.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1987
 Jul. Cereal chemistry v. 64 (4): p. 218-222; 1987 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guatemala; Peru; Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus;
 Flowers; Instant foods; Nutritional value; Food composition;
 Extrusion
 
 
 166                                    NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 Nutritional evaluation of grain amaranth for growing
 chickens. Acar, N.; Vohra, P.; Becker, R.; Hanners, G.D.;
 Saunders, R.M. Champaign, Ill. : Poultry Science Association; 1988
 Aug.
 Poultry science v. 67 (8): p. 1166-1173; 1988 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chickens; Amaranthus; Nutritional assessment;
 Nutritive value; Metabolizable energy; Crop products
 
 
 167                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QP141.A1J6 Nutritional evaluation of some green leafy
 vegetables.
 Gopala Rao, P.; Mallikarjuna, K.; Gururaja Rao, G.
 Coimbatore, Sri Avinashilingam Home Science College; Jan 1980. The
 Indian journal of nutrition and dietetics v. 17 (1): p. 9-12.
 charts; Jan 1980.  10 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: India; Leafy green vegetables; Nutrient content
 determination; Diet improvement; Nutritional value; Wild foods
 
 Abstract:  Leafy green vegetables are a cheap source of nutrients
 which should be far better utilized in the diets of poorer people
 to combat malnutrition. Some common plants in India which have been
 ignored through ignorance actually have significant nutrient
 content. Celosia, Rumex, Amaranthus, Moringa, Trianthema,
 Coriandrum and Digera arvensis were analyzed for protein content,
 nitrogen, reducing and non-reducing sugars, starch, and the B
 vitamins. These results, along with already established values for
 vitamins A, C, calcium and iron, indicate that such plants as
 Trianthema portulacastrum, Celosia and Moringa would be highly
 valuable additions to the Indian diet.
 
 
 168                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.9 AM31
 Nutritional evaluation with rats of leaf protein
 concentrates prepared from Amaranthus species and tropical
 forages.
 Cheeke, P.R.; Telek, L.; Carlsson, R.; Evans, J.
 s.l., The Society; 1980.
 Proceedings of the annual meeting - American Society of Animal
 Science. Western Section v. 31: p. 106-109; 1980. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 169                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Nutritional significance of dietary fiber in
 counteracting the amaranth-toxicity in rats: a possible explanation
 of the mechanism (Food Red No. 2).
 Takeda, H.; Tsujita, J.; Emoto, T.; Ebihara, K.; Kiriyama, S. Los
 Altos, Calif., Geron-X; Jan 1982.
 Nutrition reports international v. 25 (1): p. 169-187; Jan 1982. 
 30 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 170                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.8 J82
 Nutritional value for young children of grain amaranth and maize-
 amaranth mixtures: effect of processing.
 Morales, E.; Lembcke, J.; Graham, G.G.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Institute of Nutrition; 1988 Jan. The
 Journal of nutrition v. 118 (1): p. 78-85. charts; 1988 Jan. 
 Includes 20 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Diet; Amaranthus; Maize; Mixtures; Children; Infant
 formulas; Food processing; Nutritional value
 
 Abstract:  A study assessed the nutritional value of amaranth as
 toasted flour, popped grain, or flakes in maize-amaranth diets fed
 to 9 male infants and young children. Fecal weight, and energy,
 fat, and carbohydrate intakes were higher than with a casein
 control diet, while nitrogen absorption and retention was slightly
 lower. No significant differences in fecal loss, nitrogen balance,
 body weight gain, or serum albumin level were found between the
 types of amaranth, and no signs of intolerance with the diets were
 noted.(wz)
 
 
 171                                    NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 The nutritional value of amaranth for feeding chickens. Laovoravit,
 N.; Kratzer, F.H.; Becker, R.
 Champaign, Ill. : Poultry Science Association; 1986 Jul.
 Poultry science v. 65 (7): p. 1365-1370; 1986 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chickens; Amaranthus caudatus; Nutritional value;
 Autoclaving; Metabolizable energy; Thiamine; Lysine; Feed
 conversion efficiency
 
 
 172                                        NAL Call. No.: 49 J82
 Nutritive value of a vegetable amaranth cultivar for growing lambs.
 Pond, W.G.; Lehmann, J.W.
 Champaign, Ill. : American Society of Animal Science; 1989 Nov.
 Journal of animal science v. 67 (11): p. 3036-3039; 1989 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Lambs; Amaranthus caudatus; Nutritive value; Feed
 intake; Growth rate; Digestibility
 
 
 173                                      NAL Call. No.: 64.8 M41
 The nutritive value of amaranth grain (Amaranthus caudatus). 1.
 Protein and minerals of raw and processed grain.
 Pedersen, B.; Kalinowski, L.S.; Eggum, B.O.
 Dordrecht : Martinus Nijhoff/W. Junk Publishers; 1987.
 Qualitas plantarum; Plant foods for human nutrition v. 36 (4): p.
 309-324; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Peru; Rats; Food grains; Non-traditional crops;
 Protein content; Prepared foods; Raw foods; Nutritive value
 
 
 174                                      NAL Call. No.: 64.8 M41
 The nutritive value of amaranth grain (Amaranthus caudatus). 2. As
 a supplement to cereals.
 Pedersen, B.; Hallgren, L.; Hansen, I.; Eggum, B.O.
 Dordrecht : Martinus Nijhoff/W. Junk Publishers; 1987.
 Qualitas plantarum; Plant foods for human nutrition v. 36 (4): p.
 325-334; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Food grains; Non-traditional crops; Nutritional
 value; Food supplements; Cooking losses
 
 
 175                                         NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.P53 The nutritive value of amaranth grain (Amaranthus
 caudatus). 3. Energy and fibre of raw and processed grain.
 Pedersen, B.; Knudsen, K.E.B.; Eggum, B.O.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Academic; 1990 Jan.
 Plant foods for human nutrition v. 40 (1): p. 61-71; 1990 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Raw foods; Processed products;
 Nutritional value; Food composition; Food fiber; Caloric value
 
 
 176                                     NAL Call. No.: 41.8 C163
 Nutritive value of leaf protein concentrates prepared from
 Amaranthus species (Rat feeding trials).
 Cheeke, P.R.; Carlsson, R.; Kohler, G.O.
 Ottawa, Agricultural Institute of Canada; Mar 1981.
 Canadian journal of animal science v. 61 (1): p. 109-204; Mar 1981.
 Bibliography p. 203-204.
 
 
 177                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QH84.8.B46 Occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae with
 Amaranthaceae in soils of the Indian semi-arid region.
 Neeraj; Shanker, A.; Mathew, J.; Varma, A.
 Berlin : Springer International; 1991.
 Biology and fertility of soils v. 11 (2): p. 140-144; 1991. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Achyranthes; Aerva; Alternanthera; Amaranthus;
 Celosia; Endomycorrhizas; Endogonales; Gigaspora; Glomus; Soil
 fungi; Symbiosis; Vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizas; Fungal
 morphology; Semiarid soils; Soil ph; Soil water
 
 
 178                                     NAL Call. No.: 442.8 AM3
 Outcrossing rate in grain amaranths (Amaranthus curentus,
 Amaranthus hypochondriacus).
 Jain, S.K.; Hauptli, H.; Vaidya, K.R.
 Washington, D.C., American Genetic Association; Jan/Feb 1982. The
 Journal of heredity v. 73 (1): p. 70-72; Jan/Feb 1982.  Includes 11
 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 179                                      NAL Call. No.: 382 SO12
 Oxalate in vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus gangeticus). Forms,
 contents, and their possible implications for human
 health.
 Vityakon, P.; Standal, B.R.
 Essex : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1989.
 Journal of the science of food and agriculture v. 48 (4): p.
 469-474; 1989. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus gangeticus; Chemical constituents of
 plants; Oxalates; Calcium; Bioavailability
 
 Abstract:  Forms of oxalate in Amaranthus gangeticus L (a vegetable
 amaranth) grown in three sites with different soil and climatic
 factors were identified, and their contents were determined. On
 average the total oxalate content was 91 g kg-1 on a dry weight
 basis. This is high when compared with the amounts reported to be
 a health hazard in other vegetables and forage crops. Two dominant
 fractions of oxalate in amaranth were isolated: a fraction soluble
 in boiling water which was predominantly in the form of potassium
 and magnesium oxalate, and an associated insoluble residue which
 was predominantly calcium oxalate. Most of the Ca in amaranth is
 unlikely to be available to the body. A suggestion was made that
 research on reducing the oxalate content of amaranth should first
 be directed at soluble oxalates because they can interfere with Ca
 availability from other food sources.
 
 
 180                                     NAL Call. No.: 421 EN835
 Parasites of Spodoptera exigua, Spodoptera eridania
 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Herpetogramma bipunctalis
 (Lepidoptera; Pyralidae) collected from Amaranthus hybridus in
 field corn.
 Tingle, F.C.; Ashley, T.R.
 Paris, Organisation internationale de lutte biologique contre les
 animaux et plantes nuisibles; 1978.
 Entomophaga v. 23 (4): p. 343-347. ill; 1978.  2 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH; FRENCH
 
 
 181                                    NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 Performance and yields of broilers fed extruded grain amaranth and
 grown to market weight.
 Tillman, P.B.; Waldroup, P.W.
 Champaign, Ill. : Poultry Science Association; 1988 May.
 Poultry science v. 67 (5): p. 743-749; 1988 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Broilers; Amaranthus; Body weight; Diet studies; Feed
 composition tables; Feed intake; Liveweight gains; Performance
 
 
 182                                      NAL Call. No.: SF95.A55
 Performance of calves on diets containing Amaranthus leaf meal.
 Odwongo, W.O.; Mugerwa, J.S.
 Amsterdam, Elsevier; Sept 1980.
 Animal feed science and technology v. 5 (3): p. 193-204. ill; Sept
 1980. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 183                                      NAL Call. No.: SB183.F5
 Phasic development in field crops. III. The
 pseudocereals, buckwheat and grain amaranth (Effects of temperature
 and photoperiod, adaptation to poor growing conditions).
 Angus, J.F.; Mackenzie, D.H.; Myers, R.J.K.; Foale, M.A.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company; Dec 1982. Field
 crops research v. 5 (4): p. 305-318. ill; Dec 1982.  2 p. ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 184                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QK882.P58 Photosynthetic characteristics of Amaranthus tricolor, a
 C4 (carbon pathway) tropical leafy vegetable.
 Lin, Z.F.; Ehleringer, J.
 The Hague : Martinus Nijhoff/W. Junk; 1983.
 Photosynthesis research v. 4 (2): p. 171-178; 1983.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 185                                     NAL Call. No.: 340.8 AG8
 Photosynthetic efficiency of Amaranthus hybridus grown in the
 field. Fasheun, A.; Ibe, M.I.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1986 Apr.
 Agricultural and forest meteorology v. 36 (4): p. 335-341; 1986
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus hybridus; Photosynthesis; Solar radiation;
 Leaf area index
 
 
 186                                      NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C33
 Physical properties and some nutritional characteristics of an
 extrusion product with defatted amaranth seeds and defatted maize
 gluten meal (80:20 ratio).
 Koeppe, S.J.; Harris, P.L.; Hanna, M.A.; Rupnow, J.H.; Walker,
 C.E.; Cuppett, S.L.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1987
 Sep. Cereal chemistry v. 64 (5): p. 332-336. ill; 1987 Sep. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maize gluten meal; Amaranthus; Seeds; Flours; Extruded
 foods; Physico-chemical properties; Nutritional value
 
 
 187                                       NAL Call. No.:
 S322.S55S55 Plant density and fertiliser studies on some leafy
 vegetables (Brassica spices, Amaranthus, Ipomea aguatica,
 Singapore).
 Lee, S.K.
 Singapore : Primary Production Department; Jan 1983.
 Singapore journal of primary industries v. 11 (1): p. 40-45. ill;
 Jan 1983. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Singapore
 
 
 188                               NAL Call. No.: HD9000.1.A3 F&N
 Poor people's crops.
 Vietmeyer, Noel
 Sept 1978. v. 1 (8); Sept 1978.
 AgendaUnited States Agency for International Development v. 1 (8):
 p. 12-17. ill; Sept 1978. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: Proteins, plant; Nutrient sources; Developing nations;
 Technical assistance; Soybeans; Agricultural research; Crop yields
 
 Abstract:  Some of the Third World's best crops may be waiting in
 the poor man's garden, ignored by science. The soybean, now
 probably providing the world with more protein than any other plant
 species, was considered a poor man's crop 50 years ago. Five
 underexploited tropical plants--marama bean, winged bean, tarwi,
 bambara groundnut, and amaranths--are examined. To study, improve
 and establish such crops should be the responsibility of
 agricultural research stations in developing countries.
 
 
 189                                        NAL Call. No.:
 SB998.N4N4 Population development and effects of Rotylenchulus
 reniformis on gorwth of Amaranthus viridis and three culitvars of
 Hibiscus sabdariffa. Heffes, T.A.P.; Coates-Beckford, P.L.; Hutton,
 D.G.
 Auburn, Ala. : Organization of Tropical American Nematologists;
 1990 Jun. Nematropica v. 20 (1): p. 95-98; 1990 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Jamaica; Amaranthus viridis; Hibiscus sabdariffa;
 Cultivars; Crop damage; Growth; Pest resistance; Rotylenchulus
 reniformis; Nematode control; Population density
 
 
 190                                       NAL Call. No.:
 QP141.A1J68 Post-prandial plasma aminograms in the assessment of
 protein quality for young children: Maize and grain amaranth, alone
 and combined.
 Graham, G.G.; Lembcke, J.; Morales, E.
 Basingstoke : The Macmillan Press Ltd; 1990 Jan.
 European journal of clinical nutrition v. 44 (1): p. 35-43. charts;
 1990 Jan. Includes 25 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maize; Amaranthus; Free amino acids; Protein quality;
 Protein digestibility; Protein intake; Food composition; Nitrogen
 retention; Toasting; Popping quality; Flaking; Amino acids;
 Children
 
 Abstract:  Post-prandial (p.p.) changes in plasma free amino acid
 (AA) concentrations of children consuming a single source of
 protein at critical levels are determined by its digestibility and
 total essential AA/total AA ratios; the molar proportion of the
 limiting EAA (EAA/TEAA), if any, will fall significantly in plasma
 as it is utilized more completely than others. Grain amaranths
 (Am), reputedly rich in lysine (Lys) and tryptophan (Trp), but
 moderately deficient in leucine (Leu), should be ideal complements
 to Lys and Trp-poor, Leu-rich maize (M). Most animal studies
 confirm this. In children, 20, 30 and even 50 per cent replacement
 of M proteins with toasted Am proteins had failed to show any gains
 over M or Am alone: heat losses of Lys were suspected. Plasma
 obtained during the above studies, before and 3 h and 4 h after the
 first meal of the last day of consuming Am alone, three M-toasted
 Am mixtures, or M alone, were analysed for free AAs. Toasted,
 popped or flaked Am consumption caused significant p.p. falls in
 molar proportions of Leu from 99 to 85, 88 to 82, and 92 to 75, and
 of threonine (Thr) from 118 to 108 (popped) and 109 to 97 flaked)
 mmol/mol TEAA, suggesting that these were first- and second-
 limiting EAAs. Post-prandial fall in Lys proportion was
 questionably significant. The M diet produced highly significant 3-
 h Leu elevation from 132 to 187, Lys fall from 167 to 135, and Trp
 fall from 62 to 46 mmol/mol TEAA. With all three M-Am mixtures, Trp
 fall was completely prevented and Leu elevation was blunted, but
 significant p.p. falls in Lys occurred, confirming the impression
 that toasting had significantly compromised the anticipated surplus
 Lys in the Am available for complementation.
 
 
 191                                        NAL Call. No.: 10 OU8
 The potential of leaf vegetables in Nigeria.
 Lucas, E.O.
 Oxford : Pergamon Press; 1988.
 Outlook on agriculture v. 17 (4): p. 163-168. ill; 1988.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Amaranthaceae; Basellaceae; Compositae;
 Cucurbitaceae; Cultivars; Classification; Fertilizer requirement
 determinatio; Plant diseases; Plant pests; Nutritional value; Food
 processing; Food storage
 
 
 192                                       NAL Call. No.: 24 EA74 A
 preliminary note on the growth of Amaranthus sp. at
 Morogoro, Tanzania (Dry weights, yields).
 Tarimo, H.M.; EAFJA; Huxley, P.A.
 Nairobi : Kenya Agricultural Research Institute; 1979 (pub. 1983).
 East African agricultural and forestry journal v. 44 (3): p.
 183-186; 1979 (pub. 1983).  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tanzania
 
 
 193                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Preliminary studies on the effects of storage on processed
 Amaranthus leaves. Omueti, O.; Saseun, C.O.; Ukhedobah, C.I. The
 Hague : International Society for Horticultural Science; Dec 1983.
 Acta horticulturea (123): p. 339-345; Dec 1983.  Paper presented at
 the "Sixth African Symposium on Horticultural Crops," 19-25 July,
 1981, Ibadan, Nigeria. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 194                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Preliminary studies on the nutritive value of some
 cereal-like grains. Afolabi, A.O.; Oke, O.L.; Umoh, I.B.
 Los Altos, Calif., Geron-X; Aug 1981.
 Nutrition reports international v. 24 (2): p. 389-394. charts; Aug
 1981.  6 ref.
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Plant sources of foods; Grains; Amaranth
 grain; Novel foods; Nutrient values; Proximate composition; Amino
 acids; Demonstrations (Animal); Protein efficiency ratio
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The seeds of Aramanthus, Celosia, and Corchorus
 were analyzed for their protein nutrient values by proximate
 analysis and by dietary experimentation on rats. The results
 indicated that the lysine contents ranged from 4.0-5.5 g/16 gN,
 which is higher than conventional cereals, with Corchorus having
 the highest amount. The methionine contents were marginal (1.6-1.9
 g/gN) when compared to FAO/WHO patterns. All the seeds were highly
 digestible. The PER of Celosia (2.1) was comparable to that of
 casein. However, all the rats on Amaranthus lost weight, giving a
 negative PER (-2.4), probably due to the high tannin content.
 (author/cj)
 
 
 195                                     NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C333
 Preparation, composition, and nutritional implications of amaranth
 seed oil. Becker, R.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1989
 Nov. Cereal foods world v. 34 (11): p. 950-953. charts; 1989 Nov. 
 Includes 36 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Seed oils; Food composition; Nutritional
 value; Essential amino acids; Fatty acids; Nutrient contents
 
 Abstract:  Amaranth is a dicotyledonous pseudo-cereal which has
 been identified as a new crop with potential for increased
 commercial application. Current food application include breakfast
 cereals, bakery products and extruded foods. This article describes
 the physical and chemical properties of the amaranth seed, the
 technology of seed oil preparation, and the nutrient composition of
 the amaranth grain and oil. The proximate composition, vitamin
 content, mineral content and the fatty acid composition of the
 amaranth grain and oil are compared to that for other grains.
 
 
 196                                    NAL Call. No.: 389.1 W892
 Prevention of vitamin A deficiency.
 Srikantia, S.G.; WRNDA
 Symposium on Vitamin and Carrier Functions of Polyprenoids, (1976,
 Bangalore,.
 Basel : S. Karger; 1978.
 World review of nutrition and dietetics v. 31: p. 95-99; 1978. 
 Includes 13 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vitamin deficiencies; Vitamin A; Disease prevention;
 Preventive nutrition; Preschool children (2-5 years); Protein-
 calorie malnutrition; Longitudinal studies; Human nutrition
 research
 
 Abstract:  The results of several studies concerning techniques for
 preventing vitamin A (VtA) deficiency in children are discussed.
 One study involved assessment of the effects of adding a commonly-
 used green leafy vegetable (amaranth, at 30 g/day) to the diets of
 rural children suffering from mild to moderate protein-calorie
 malnutrition, providing about 1 mg beta-carotene above the
 traditional diet. After 3 weeks, serum VtA levels were higher than
 in a similar group not receiving amaranth. Fortification of a
 suitable food with VtA (such as was done using sugar as the carrier
 in Guatemala) was successful, but may not always work depending on
 the food selected. Fortification of salt in India was unsuccessful
 because of the rapid rate added VtA was lost. Another study
 provided a single oral dose of 90 mg water-miscible VtA to a large
 group of preschool children, 25% of which developed transient signs
 of acute VtA toxicity. On the other hand, a 5-year longitudinal
 study of about 2500 preschoool children receiving 90 mg VtA once a
 year showed a reduction in ocular signs of VtA deficiency by about
 75% with no new cases of keratomalacia. Based on this study, a
 program has been initiated to provide 60 mg (to reduce toxicity)
 VtA each 6 months to 4 million Indian children 1-5 years-old. (wz)
 
 
 197                             NAL Call. No.: SB191.A42A42 1977
 Proceedings of the First Amaranth Seminar, July 29, 1977. Amaranth
 Seminar 1977 : New Organic Gardening Experimental Farm); Rodale
 Press
 Emmaus, Pa. : The Press, [1977?]; 1977.
 130 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  "Held at the New Organic Gardening
 Experimental Farm in Maxatawny, Pennsyvania"--Cover.  Includes
 bibliographies.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Congresses; Wild plants, Edible;
 Congresses
 
 
 198                                    NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 Processing grain amaranth for use in broiler diets.
 Tillman, P.B.; Waldroup, P.W.
 Champaign, Ill. : Poultry Science Association; 1986 Oct.
 Poultry science v. 65 (10): p. 1960-1964; 1986 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Broiler feeding; Amaranthus caudatus; Feed grains;
 Autoclaving; Extrusion; Diets; Weight gain; Broiler performance
 
 
 199                                       NAL Call. No.: 450 F55
 Protein and amino acid composition of grain amaranth seeds. Misra,
 P.S.; Prakash, D.; Pandey, R.M.; Pal, M.
 Milano : Inverni della Beffa; 1985.
 Fitoterapia v. 56 (5): p. 318-320; 1985.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Varieties; Seeds; Protein composition;
 Amino acids
 
 
 200                                       NAL Call. No.:
 QP141.A1N88 Protein value for children of soft-endosperm maize,
 alone and with toasted amaranth floor.
 Graham, G.G.; Lembcke, J.; Morales, E.
 Elmsford, N.Y. : Pergamon Press; 1989 Aug.
 Nutrition research v. 9 (8): p. 859-866. charts; 1989 Aug. 
 Includes 15 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maize meal; Nutritional value; Protein quality;
 Complementary proteins; Nutritional assessment; Children
 
 Abstract:  Six young children consumed a diet in which whole kernel
 maize meal supplied 81.6% of the energy (E) and 100% of protein
 (6.4% of E); vegetable oil completed 25% of E as fat. Apparent
 absorption (abs) of E was 89 +/- 2%, of nitrogen (N) 76 +/- 7% of
 intake; apparent N retention (ret) was 25 +/- 11% of intake. The
 same six plus four other children consumed diet M-A: maize supplied
 40.8% of E and 50% of protein, toasted amaranth 24.0% of E and 50%
 of the 6.4% protein E, oil completed 25% fat E. Apparent abs of E
 was 89 +/- 3%, of N 68 +/- 9% (P less than 0.05); apparent N ret
 was 26 +/- 10% of intake. Apparent E abs from casein diets
 preceding maize or M-A was higher (94 +/- 3 and 94 +/- 1%, P less
 than 0.01), with similar low fecal fat but much lower fecal
 "carbohydrate" losses (5.2 +/- 2.2 and 6.3 +/- 2.6 g/d vs 17.4 +/-
 3.2 and 16.4 +/- 2.7 g/d from maize and M-A). N abs from preceding
 casein (81 +/-7%) was not significantly higher than from maize, but
 that from casein (82 +/-4%) preceding M-A was higher (P less than
 0.01) than from M-A. N ret from casein (36 +/- 5 and 36 +/- 6%) was
 higher (P less than 0.05) than from maize or M-A. The seeming lack
 of protein complementation in M-A may be due to the relatively high
 N abs and ret from Peruvian white soft-endosperm maize and to
 amaranth protein damage during toasting.
 
 
 201                                        NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.F662 The proteins of grain amaranth.
 Bressani, R.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1989.
 Food reviews international v. 5 (1): p. 13-38; 1989.  Literature
 review. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Protein content; Amino acids; Cultural
 methods; Protein quality; Food processing; Nutritive value
 
 
 202                                   NAL Call. No.: 389.8 F7322
 Puffing effects on functional properties of Amaranthus paniculatas
 (Rajgeera) seed flour.
 Singhal, R.S.; Kulkarni, P.R.
 Chicago, Ill. : The Institute; 1991 Jul.
 Journal of food science : an official publication of the Institute
 of Food Technologists v. 56 (1): p. 1121-1122; 1991 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus cruentus; Seeds; Flours; Water holding
 capacity; Fat absorption; Gelation; Foaming; Viscosity
 
 Abstract:  Among functional properties studied, water- and fat-
 holding capacities were higher for puffed grain flour. Gelation was
 not affected, while foaming was adversely affected by puffing. A
 decrease in viscosity of flour pastes also resulted due to
 puffing.
 
 
 203                                       NAL Call. No.: 11 AC82
 Quantity and quality of leaf protein concentrates from Atriplex
 hortensis L., Chenopodium quinoa Willd. and Amaranthus caudatus L.,
 grown in southern Sweden.
 Carlsson, R.
 Stockholm, Scandinavian Association of Agricultural Scientists;
 1980. Acta agriculturae scandinavica v. 30 (4): p. 418-426. ill;
 1980.  Bibliography p. 425-426.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 Descriptors: Sweden
 
 
 204                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 J825
 Rapid determination of leaf area in ovate vegetable leaves by
 linear measurements.
 Ajayi, N.O.
 Ashford : Headley Brothers Ltd; 1990 Jan.
 The Journal of horticultural science v. 65 (1): p. 1-5; 1990 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vernonia amygdalina; Amaranthus caudatus; Leaf area;
 Measurement; Rapid methods
 
 
 205                                     NAL Call. No.: 307.8 J82
 Rapid transesterification and mass spectrometric approach to seed
 oil analysis.
 Avorinde, F.O.; Clifton, J. Jr; Afolabi, O.A.; Shepard, R.L.
 Champaign, Ill. : The Society; 1988 Jun.
 Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society v. 65 (6): p.
 942-947; 1988 Jun.  Paper presented at the "Symposium on the
 Biology, Biochemistry and Technology of Lipases," May 17-21, 1987,
 New Orleans, LA.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vernonia; Amaranthus caudatus; Vegetables; Seed oils;
 Analytical methods; Quantitative techniques; Esterification; Rapid
 methods; Mass spectrometry; Fatty acids; Chemical composition;
 Biochemistry
 
 
 206                                      NAL Call. No.: S587.T47
 Reactions of Amaranthus species to the reniform
 nematode.
 Siddiqui, M.A.; Alam, M.M.
 London : Association of Applied Biologists; 1989 Apr.
 Tests of agrochemicals and cultivars (10): p. 130-131; 1989 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Amaranthus; Varieties; Rotylenchulus
 reniformis; Meloidogyne incognita; Crop sensitivity; Pest
 resistance; Varietal susceptibility
 
 
 207                                       NAL Call. No.: 80 AC82
 Regeneration potential, leaf and seed yield of vegetable amaranth,
 (Amaranthus cruentus L.) as a function of initial topping heights.
 Mnzava, N.A.; Masam, A.M.
 Wageningen : International Society for Horticultural Science; 1985
 Jun. Acta horticulturae (153): p. 151-160; 1985 Jun.  Presented at
 the Ninth African Symposium on Horticultural Crops, Mahe,
 Seychelles, July 27-29, 1983. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Tanzania; Amaranthus caudatus; Topping; Harvesting
 frequency; Plant height; Growth; Leaves; Seeds; Crop yield;
 Regeneration; Tropics
 
 
 208                                     NAL Call. No.: 64.8 C883
 Registration of 'Amont' grain amaranth.
 Schulz-Schaeffer, J.; Baldridge, D.E.; Bowman, H.F.; Stallknecht,
 G.F.; Larson, R.A.
 Madison, Wis. : Crop Science Society of America; 1991 Mar. Crop
 science v. 31 (2): p. 482-483; 1991 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Stenotaphrum secundatum; Cultivars; Registration;
 Plant breeding; Agronomic characteristics; Lawns and turf
 
 
 209                                     NAL Call. No.: 64.8 C883
 Registration of Montana-3 grain amaranth germplasm.
 Schulz-Schaeffer, J.; Stallknecht, G.F.; Baldridge, D.E.; Larson,
 R.A. Madison, Wis. : Crop Science Society of America; 1989 Jan.
 Crop science v. 29 (1): p. 244-245; 1989 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Amaranthus caudatus; Germplasm releases;
 Registration; Parentage; Agronomic characteristics
 
 
 210                                     NAL Call. No.: 64.8 C883
 Registration of Montana-5 grain amaranth germplasm.
 Schulz-Schaeffer, J.; Webb, D.M.; Baldridge, D.E.; Stallknecht,
 G.F.; Larson, R.A.
 Madison, Wis. : Crop Science Society of America; 1989 Nov. Crop
 science v. 29 (6): p. 1581; 1989 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Montana; Amaranthus caudatus; Germplasm releases;
 Registration; Performance traits; Grain
 
 
 211                                         NAL Call. No.:
 SB128.M66 The regulation of photosynthetic rate by sink demand.
 Wardlaw, I.F.
 Wantage Oxfordshire : The Group; 1985.
 Monograph - British Plant Growth Regulation Group (12): p. 145-162;
 1985.  In the series analytic: Regulation of sources and sinks in
 crop plants / edited by B. Jeffcoat, A.F. Hawkins and A.D. Stead.
 Proceedings of a Symposium, September 25-26, 1984, University of
 York, Heslington, York.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Triticum aestivum; Oryza sativa; Amaranthus;
 Simmondsia chinensis; Photosynthesis; Regulation; Leaves; Carbon
 dioxide; Weight; Photosynthate accumulation; Water stress; Nutrient
 deficiencies
 
 
 212                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QK882.A1P4 Relationships between leaf conductance, intercellular
 CO2 (carbon dioxide) partial pressure and CO2 uptake rate in two C3
 and C4 (carbon pathways) plant species (Pepper, Capiscum annuum,
 Helianthus annuus L., maize, Zea mays, Amaranthus
 hypochondriacus).
 Ramos, C.; PHSYB; Hall, A.E.
 Praha : Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences; 1982.
 Photosynthetica v. 16 (3): p. 343-355; 1982.  34 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 213                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 The replacement value of pressed crop of Amaranthus
 (Caudatus) or Brewers' dried grains for corn in rabbit diet. A
 preliminary report. Omole, T.A.; Oke, O.L.
 Los Altos, Calif., Geron-X; Oct 1979.
 Nutrition reports international v. 20 (4): p. 587-592. ill; Oct
 1979.  6 ref. Christian Aid UK.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 214                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QK745.P56 Reserving the inhibitory effect of paclobutrazol on seed
 germination of Amaranthus paniculatus by GA3, ethephon or ACC.
 Kepczynski, J.; Kepczynska, E.
 Dordrecht : Kluwer Acadmeic Publishers; 1988 Mar.
 Plant growth regulation v. 7 (1): p. 47-52; 1988 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus paniculatus; Seed germination; Ga;
 Ethephon; Ethylene production; Growth; Growth retardants
 
 
 215                                      NAL Call. No.: S587.T47
 Response of four Amaranthus cultivars to nitrogen levels and
 harvesting methods.
 Olufolaji, A.O.
 London : Association of Applied Biologists; 1989 Apr.
 Tests of agrochemicals and cultivars (10): p. 166-167; 1989 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus dubius; Amaranthus tRicolor; Amaranthus
 caudatus; Cultivars; Urea; Fertilizer application; Cutting;
 Pulling; Crop yield
 
 
 216                                        NAL Call. No.: 49 J82
 Response of growing rats to Amaranthus sp grain as the soil source
 of energy and protein.
 Pond, W.G.; Clark, R.L.; Lehmann, J.W.
 Champaign, Ill. : American Society of Animal Science; 1988. Journal
 of animal science v. 66 (suppl.1): p. 130-131; 1988.  Paper
 presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the American Society of
 Animal Science, held March 21-23, 1988, Des Moines, Iowa.  Includes
 abstract.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Amaranthus; Growth; Diets; Maize; Energy
 sources; Protein sources
 
 
 217                                        NAL Call. No.:
 SB123.P535 Response to mass selection for plant height and grain
 yield in amaranth (Amaranthus spp.).
 Vaidya, K.R.; Jain, S.K.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Paul Parey; 1987 Feb.
 Plant breeding; Zeitschrift fur Pflanzenzuchtung v. 98 (1): p.
 61-64; 1987 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus; Plant breeding;
 Breeding aims; Plant height; Grain; Crop yield; Selection methods;
 Genetic variation
 
 
 218                                      NAL Call. No.: QL750.O3
 Responses of gas exchange to humidity in populations of three herbs
 from environments differing in atmospheric water. Bunce, J.A.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Springer International; 1986 Dec.
 Oecologia v. 71 (1): p. 117-120; 1986 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; California; Abutilon theophrasti; Amaranthus
 hybridus; Chenopodium album; Photosynthesis; Leaf conductance;
 Humidity; Water vapor; Temperature; Selection
 
 
 219                               NAL Call. No.: SB998.N4R4 1981
 Root-knot nematodes on cowpea and some selected vegetable crops.
 Ogunfowora, A.O.
 Ibadan, Nigeria : International Institute of Tropical Agriculture;
 1982. Proceedings of the Third Research Planning Conference on
 Root-Knot Nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. : Region IV, Benin, Ghana,
 Ivory Coast, Nigeria; Region V, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe
 : Nov 16-20. p. 72-84; 1982.  Includes 18 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Meloidogyne incognita; Vigna unguiculata; Amaranthus;
 Solanum; Rotations
 
 
 220                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Saccharides of amaranth.
 Lorenz, K.; Gross, M.
 Los Altos, Calif. : Geron-X, Inc; 1984 Mar.
 Nutrition reports international v. 29 (3): p. 721-726. charts; 1984
 Mar. Includes 13 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Sugar; Sucrose; Nutrient contents;
 Analytical methods
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The saccharide composition of 8 samples of
 amaranth was determined. Sucrose was the major sugar in 70% ethanol
 extracts of amaranth. The extracts also contained raffinose,
 glucose and fructose. Autolysis at pH 6.5 and 5.0, respectively,
 changed the saccaride composition. Maltose and maltotriose were
 detected with autolysis in water. Maltotriose values decreased
 while maltose values increased with autolysis of the samples in the
 pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Dark-seeded varieties seem to have lower
 amylase activity and/or amylase inhibitor and higher invertase
 activities than light-seeded varieties. (Author)
 
 
 221                                       NAL Call. No.: 410 EC7
 The seasonal contribution of C3 (3Carbon) and C4 (4Carbon) Plant
 species to primary production in a mixed prairie
 (Amaranthaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Poaceae, South
 Dakota).
 Ode, D.J.; Tieszen, L.L.; Lerman, J.C.
 Durham, Ecological Society of America; Dec 1980.
 Ecology v. 61 (6): p. 1304-1311. ill; Dec 1980.  Bibliography p.
 1310-1311.
 
 Descriptors: South Dakota; Prairies
 
 
 222                                     NAL Call. No.: 450 J8224
 Seed lipids of the grain amaranths (High protein grains, Celosia
 argentea, Amaranthus sp., nutritional value).
 Opute, F.I.
 Oxford, Clarendon Press; June 1979.
 Journal of experimental botany v. 30 (116): p. 601-606. ill; June
 1979.  16 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 223                                         NAL Call. No.:
 TX543.F66 Seed structure and composition of potential new
 crops.
 Irving, D.W.; Becker, R.
 AMF O'Hare, Ill. : Scanning Electron Microscopy, Inc; 1985. Food
 microstructure v. 4 (1): p. 43-53. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Prosopis (leguminosae); Seeds;
 Composition; Ultrastructure
 
 
 224                                         NAL Call. No.:
 TX341.N88 Selected risk factors for diabetes in Native
 Americans.
 Mohs, M.E.; Leonard, T.K.; Watson, R.R.
 Elmsford : Pergamon Press; 1985 Sep.
 Nutrition research v. 5 (9): p. 1035-1045. charts; 1985 Sep. 
 Includes 57 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Diabetes; Risks; Alcoholism; Obesity; Genetic factors;
 Epidemiology; Behavior modification; American indians; Literature
 reviews
 
 Abstract:  A literature review focuses on some etiological risk
 factors for diabetes in native American Indians that are directly
 related to diet. Several interrelationships of these factors with
 genetic predisposition to diabetes also are discussed. It is
 concluded that alcoholism and obesity adversely affect glucose
 metabolism, and that the Western diet and lifestyle may be
 associated with an increased risk for observed diabetes and obesity
 incidence. Treatment and educational programs need to be designed
 for each tribe's traditional cultural beliefs and practices, and
 increased native food use (e.g., amaranth, low-fat plants) needs to
 be encouraged.(wz)
 
 
 225                                         NAL Call. No.:
 QK867.J67 Selection of grain Amaranthus species for tolerance to
 excess aluminum in an acid soil.
 Campbell, T.A.; Foy, C.D.
 New York, N.Y. : Marcel Dekker; 1987 Feb.
 Journal of plant nutrition v. 10 (3): p. 249-260; 1987 Feb. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Maryland; Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus hybridus;
 Acid soils; Aluminum; Tolerances; Selection; Populations; Plant
 breeding; Selection criteria; Agronomic characteristics
 
 
 226                                        NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Sensory evaluation of vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus spp.)
 (Appearance, flavor, texture, overall eating quality).
 Abbott, J.A.; Campbell, T.A.
 Alexandria, Va., American Society for Horticultural Science; June
 1982. HortScience v. 17 (3): p. 409-410; June 1982.  8 ref.
 
 Language:  English
 
 
 227                                     NAL Call. No.: 389.8 Z33 A
 simple TLC method for the determination of pro-vitamin A content of
 fruits and vegetables.
 Premachandra, B.R.
 Berne : Hans Huber; 1985.
 International journal for vitamin and nutrition research v. 55 (2):
 p. 139-147. ill., charts; 1985.  Includes 11 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Vitamin a; Vegetables; Fruits; Carotenes; Food
 composition; Analytical methods; Thin layer chromatography
 
 Abstract:  A simple, precise, rapid and quantitative thin-layer
 chromatography method is described for the separation and
 estimation of carotenoid pigments which is particularly useful for
 the determination of pro-vitamin A content in breeding programs of
 fruits and vegetables. The method is applied to the analysis of
 tomatoes, carrots, and the green vegetable, Amaranthus
 gangetica.(wz)
 
 
 228                                        NAL Call. No.:
 QK882.A1P4 Sodium deficiency in the C4 species Amaranthus
 tricolor L. is not completely alleviated by high CO2
 concentrations.
 Johnston, M.; Grof, C.P.L.; Brownell, P.F.
 Praha : Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences; 1986.
 Photosynthetica v. 20 (4): p. 476-479; 1986.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Leaves; Sodium; Chlorophyll;
 Carbon pathways; Carbon dioxide; Nutrient deficiencies;
 Compensation point
 
 
 229                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Sodium stimulates growth of Amaranthus tricolor L. plants through
 enhanced nitrate assimilation.
 Ohta, D.; Yasuoka, S.; Matoh, T.; Takahashi, E.
 Rockville, Md. : American Society of Plant Physiologists; 1989 Apr.
 Plant physiology v. 89 (4): p. 1102-1105; 1989 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus tRicolor; Mineral nutrition; Sodium; Enzyme
 activity; Nitrate reductase; Nitrogen assimilation; Nitrates;
 Growth rate
 
 
 230                                        NAL Call. No.:
 S605.5.O74 Staff of life.
 Leonard, T.
 Emmaus, Pa. : Rodale Press, Inc; 1988 Dec.
 Organic gardening v. 35 (12): p. 46-52. ill; 1988 Dec. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hordeum vulgare; Fagopyrum esculentum; Amaranthus;
 Pennisetum Americanum; Avena sativa; Oryza sativa; Secale cereale;
 Triticum aestivum; Food grains; Gardening
 
 
 231                                      NAL Call. No.: 309 ST22
 The starch of Amaranthus--physico-chemical properties and
 functional characteristics (Amaranthus cruentus, Amaranthus
 hypochondriacus). Stone, L.A.; Lorenz, K.
 Weinheim, W. Ger. : Verlag Chemie; July 1984.
 Starch; Starke v. 36 (7): p. 232-237. ill; July 1984.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English; German
 
 
 232                                       NAL Call. No.: 420 K13
 Studies of insects feeding on grain amaranth in the
 midwest. Wilson, R.L.
 Lawrence, Kan. : The Society; 1989 Oct.
 Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society v. 62 (4): p. 440-448;
 1989 Oct. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Amaranthus; Amaranthus caudatus; Lygus
 lineolaris; Spodoptera frugiperda; Trichoplusia ni; Ostrinia
 nubilalis; Heliothis zea; Aphis craccivora; Insect pests
 
 
 233                                    NAL Call. No.: 464.8 P565
 Studies on Amaranthus leaf mottle virus (ALMV) in the
 Mediterranean region. Lovisolo, O.; Lisa, V.
 Bologna, Unione fitopatologica mediterranea; 1979.
 Phytopathologia mediterranea v. 18: p. 89-93. ill., map; 1979.  22
 ref.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH; ITALIAN
 
 Descriptors: Mediterranean Countries
 
 
 234                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Studies on the nutritional quality of grain amaranths
 (Amaranthus paniculatus, India).
 Pant, K.C.
 Los Altos, Calif. : Geron-X, Inc; Dec 1983.
 Nutrition reports international v. 28 (6): p. 1445-1456; Dec 1983. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India
 
 
 235                                      NAL Call. No.: 59.8 C33
 Study of iron bioavailability in a native Nigerian grain amaranth
 cereal for young children, using a rat model.
 Whittaker, P.; Ologunde, M.O.
 St. Paul, Minn. : American Association of Cereal Chemists; 1990
 Sep. Cereal chemistry v. 67 (5): p. 505-508; 1990 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Breakfast cereals; Iron
 deficiency anemia; Child nutrition; Iron; Nutrient availability;
 Bioavailability; Fortification; Ferrous sulfate; Nutritive value;
 Rats
 
 
 236                                      NAL Call. No.: 421 J822
 Tarnished plant bug (Hemiptera: Miridae): effect on seed weight of
 grain amaranth.
 Olson, D.L.; Wilson, R.L.
 Lanham, Md. : Entomological Society of America; 1990 Dec.
 Journal of economic entomology v. 83 (6): p. 2443-2447; 1990 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus cruentus; Crop damage; Lygus lineolaris;
 Population density; Seed weight
 
 Abstract:  Grain amaranth, Amaranthus cruentus L., is a potential,
 alternative crop for midwestern farmers. The tarnished plant bug,
 Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), is a potentially serious
 pest of amaranth, feeding on grain amaranth and causing developing
 seed to shrivel and discolor. Field tests were conducted during
 1987 and 1988, at Ames, Iowa, to determine the effect of L.
 lineolaris on amaranth seed weight. The treatments included
 artificially (by hand) infesting heads with selected numbers of
 tarnished plant bugs and determining the effect of tarnished plant
 bug density, the effect of a naturally occurring tarnished plant
 bug population, and the effect of tarnished plant bug feeding
 duration. In 1987, when 50 tarnished plant bugs were caged on
 developing heads for 8 wk, seed weight decreased by 82%. When 10
 bugs were caged on developing heads, there was no significant
 decrease in seed weight. In 1988, when 12 bugs were caged on
 developing heads for 8 wk, seed weight decreased by 80%. In 1987,
 when tarnished plant bugs were caged on developing heads for 2, 4,
 6, or 8 wk, seed weight significantly decreased by 39.5% between
 the second and fourth week of feeding. In 1988, tarnished plant
 bugs feeding on the developing heads for 5 wk reduced seed weight
 by 57.6%. During 1987, naturally occurring tarnished plant bugs
 feeding continuously on the terminal heads significantly reduced
 seed weight by 28.2% between the third and fifth week of feeding.
 
 
 237                                       NAL Call. No.: 420 K13
 Tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)
 (Hemiptera: Miridae) oviposition site preference on three growth
 stages of a grain amaranth, Amaranthus cruentus L.
 Wilson, R.L.; Olson, D.L.
 Lawrence, Kan. : The Society; 1990 Jan.
 Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society (63): p. 88-91; 1990
 Jan. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Lygus lineolaris; Leaves;
 Oviposition
 
 
 238                                     NAL Call. No.: 57.8 OR32
 Tastier than spinach, more nutritious than wheat
 (Amaranthus, culture, nutritive value, cookery).
 DeCrosta, A.
 Emmaus, Pa., Rodale Press; Oct 1979.
 Organic gardening v. 26 (10): p. 82-86. ill; Oct 1979. 
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 239                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Temperature-dependent expression of betacyanin synthesis in
 Amaranthus (tricolor) seedlings.
 Elliott, D.C.
 Bethesda, American Society of Plant Physiologists; Feb 1979. Plant
 physiology v. 63 (2): p. 277-279. ill; Feb 1979.  6 ref. 
 Australian Research Grants Committee.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 240                                      NAL Call. No.: 450 P692
 Temperature-sensitive responses of red light-dependent betacyanin
 synthesis (in Amaranthus tricolor seedlings).
 Elliott, D.C.
 Bethesda, Md., American Society of Plant Physiologists; Oct 1979.
 Plant physiology v. 64 (4): p. 521-524. ill; Oct 1979.  10 ref. 
 Australian Research Grants Committee.
 
 Language:  ENGLISH
 
 
 241                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Trans-cis isomerisation of carotenes and its effect on
 the vitamin A potency of some common Indonesian foods.
 Pol, F. van der; Purnomo, S.U.; Rosmalen, H.A. van
 Stoneham, Mass. : Butterworth Publishers; 1988 Apr.
 Nutrition reports international v. 37 (4): p. 785-793. ill.,
 charts; 1988 Apr.  Includes 6 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Indonesia; Food composition; Carotenes; Isomerization;
 Vitamin a; Cooking; Nutrient retention
 
 Abstract:  Extract: The presence of cis-isomers of beta-carotene in
 four green leafy vegetables, waterspinach (Ipomoea aquatica),
 amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus), jointfir (Gnetum gnemon) and
 cassava leaf (Manihot utilissima) and in sweet potatoes (Ipomoea
 batates) was examined before and after traditional Indonesian ways
 of cooking. The vitamin A potency of the beta-carotene fraction was
 found to be reduced by 2 to 12% as a result of the presence of cis-
 isomers of beta-carotene in vegetables purchased on the markets in
 Surabaya. Isomerisation during traditional cooking caused an
 additional loss of up to 9%. Taking into account some analytical
 effects, multiplying contents obtained from single total beta-
 carotene and alpha-carotene determinations by 0.9 will correct in
 most cases adequately for the presence of cis-isomers.(author)
 
 
 242                                         NAL Call. No.:
 SB123.H32 Underexploited crops.
 Laidig, G.L.; Knox, E.G.; Buchanan, R.A.
 New York, N.Y. : Macmillan Publishing Co; 1984.
 Handbook of plant cell culture v. 3: p. 38-64; 1984.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Parthenium argentatum; Simmondsia chinensis; Hibiscus
 cannabinus; Asclepias syriaca; Asclepias; Crambe abyssinica;
 Amaranthus; Production possibilities
 
 
 243                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Use of grain amaranth in diets of Japanese quail and
 chickens. Vohra, P.; Bersch, S.; Acar, N.; Becker, R.
 Stoneham, Mass. : Butterworth; 1989 Jun.
 Nutrition reports international v. 39 (6): p. 1227-1235; 1989 Jun. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chickens; Japanese quails; Diet; Raw foods; Grain;
 Amaranthus caudatus; Body weight; Feed conversion efficiency
 
 Abstract:  Raw grain amaranth contain heat labile, growth
 depressing antinutrients for chickens, but Japanese quail are not
 effected by these antinutrients. Japanese quail digest whole raw
 grain amaranth very efficiently in presence of 2% sand in the diet,
 but not chickens.
 
 
 244                                        NAL Call. No.:
 RC620.A1N8 Utilization of four cultivars of grain amaranth growth
 in rats. Pond, W.G.; Lehmann, J.; Clark, R.
 Stoneham, Mass. : Butterworth; 1989 May.
 Nutrition reports international v. 39 (5): p. 1081-1089; 1989 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus leucocarpus;
 Cultivars; Nutritional value; Rats
 
 Abstract:  Growing Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in two
 experiments to determine the nutritional adequacy of four cultivars
 of grain amaranth for growth. The amaranth cultivars (16.8, 16.0,
 16.4 and 16.1% protein) were fed as the sole source of protein and
 energy or diluted with maize to provide 46.1% amaranth in the diet.
 All cultivars were fed in the ground, unheated form. A diet
 containing maize as the sole source of protein (10.3%) and energy
 was used as a control and a 16% protein maize-soybean meal diet was
 fed as a reference diet. Rats were fed ad libitum for 14 days in
 individual wire-bottom cages in a light- and temperature-controlled
 room. In each experiment (5 rats fed each of 10 diets in Exp. 1 and
 10 rats fed each of 6 diets in Exp. 2), body weight gain, feed
 intake and gain to feed ratio were recorded for each rat. Three
 cultivars (Amaranthus hypochondriacus 1024, A. hypochondriacus 1046
 and A. hypochondriacus K188) produced weight gain and feed
 utilization significantly greater (P<0.01) than maize; two
 cultivars (A. hypochondriacus 1046 and A. hypochondriacus 1046 and
 K 188) produced weight gain not significantly different from that
 obtained with the maize-soy reference diet, although daily feed
 intake was greater with the reference diet. One cultivar (A.
 cruentus 1011) allowed normal growth during week 1, followed by
 steady weight loss and decreased feed intake during week 2.
 Refeeding for 7 days of half the rats fed 1011 with maize-soy
 reference diet resulted in rapid weight recovery and absence of
 gross pathology of liver, kidney, stomach, spleen, adrenal, and
 testes at slaughter. The nature of the toxic factor present in A.
 cruentus 1011 is unknown, but ingestion seems not associated with
 permanent organ damage after 2 weeks of feeding. We conclude that
 three of the four amaranth cultivars tested promote growth of rats
 superior to that obtained with maize and comparable to that
 obtained with a 16% maize-soy diet.
 
 
 245                                    NAL Call. No.: 47.8 AM33P
 The utilization of grain amaranth by broiler chickens. Waldroup,
 P.W.; Hellwig, H.M.; Longer, D.E.; Endres, C.S.
 Champaign, Ill. : Poultry Science Association; 1985 Apr.
 Poultry science v. 64 (4): p. 759-762; 1985 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chickens; Broiler feeding; Diets; Feed grains;
 Amaranthus caudatus
 
 
 246                                         NAL Call. No.:
 SB21.A7A7 Vegetable amaranth, European cucumber and tomato trials
 at the Family Farms Research Center (in Arkansas).
 Makus, D.J.
 Fayetteville, Ark. : Arkansas State Horticultural Society; 1983.
 Proceedings of the ... annual meeting - Arkansas State
 Horticultural Society (104th): p. 32-38. ill; 1983.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Arkansas
 
 
 247                                        NAL Call. No.: SB1.H6
 Vegetable amaranth response to nitrogen fertility under moderately
 low and very low residual soil phosphorus levels. Makus, D.J.
 Alexandria, Va. : American Society for Horticultural Science; 1986
 Jun. HortScience v. 21 (3): p. 697; 1986 Jun.  Includes
 abstract.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Vegetables; Soil chemistry; Phosphorus;
 Responses; Nitrogen fertilizers; Yield increases; Chemical
 constituents of plants
 
 
 248                                NAL Call. No.: SB160.N38 1988
 Vegetable amaranths: cultivar selection for summer
 production in the south. Sealy, R.L.; McWilliams, E.L.; Novak, J.;
 Fong, F.; Kenerley, C.M. Portland, Or. Timber Press; 1988. Advances
 in new crops : proceedings of the First National Symposium NEW
 CROPS, Research, Development, Economics, Indianapolis, Indiana, Oct
 23-26, 1988 edited by Jules Janick, J.E. Simon. p. 396-398; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Southern states of U.S.A.; Amaranthus; Cultivars;
 Variety trials; Selection criteria; Leafy vegetables; Palatability;
 Disease resistance; Varietal susceptibility; Pythium myriotylum;
 Food quality; Oxalates; Beta-carotene
 
 
 249                                       NAL Call. No.: QK1.A28
 Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal associations of some Asteraceae
 and Amaranthaceae.
 Vijayalakshmi, M.; Rao, A.S.
 Meerut, India : Society for Advancement of Botany; 1988 Dec. Acta
 botanica Indica v. 16 (2): p. 168-174. ill; 1988 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: India; Compositae; Amaranthaceae; Rhizosphere;
 Vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizae; Lateritic soils; Soil fungi;
 Plant nutrition; Phosphorus uptake
 
 
 250                                        NAL Call. No.: S1.N32
 Wanted: 300 new amaranth growers.
 Cramer, C.
 Emmaus, Pa. : Regenerative Agriculture Association; 1989 Jan. The
 New farm v. 11 (1): p. 51-52. ill; 1989 Jan. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus; Drought tolerance; Market surveys;
 Growers; Supply balance
 
 
 251                                        NAL Call. No.: S1.N32
 The world is discovering amaranth.
 Cramer, C.
 Emmaus, Pa. : Regenerative Agriculture Association; 1987 Sep. The
 New farm v. 9 (6): p. 32-35. ill; 1987 Sep. 
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Amaranthus; Crop production; Crop products
 
 
 252                                      NAL Call. No.: 382 SO12
 Yield, selected chemical composition and nutritive value of 14
 selections of amaranth grain representing four species.
 Bressani, R.; Gonzales, J.M.; Zuniga, J.; Breuner, M.; Elias, L.G.
 London : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1987.
 Journal of the science of food and agriculture v. 38 (4): p.
 347-356; 1987. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amaranthus caudatus; Amaranthus hybridus; Crop yield;
 Chemical constituents of plants; Protein quality
 
 
 

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