Rural and Community Development

This resource guide was prepared by Patricia LaCaille John of the Rural Information Center, December 2005. Last Modified February, 2015. This resource guide identifies business information that may be helpful when starting or maintaining a small rural business including links to full-text resources about: issues to consider before starting a business; the how-to-start a business process; and marketing information. It also contains information on funding sources, training opportunities, technical assistance and general business information.


This article was published in Library Trends, Vol. 44, No. 1, Summer 1995, pp. 152-175 and is exempt from U.S. copyright. In April 1987 Congress approached the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to propose that it establish a rural assistance information clearinghouse. The USDA readily agreed, and the result was the creation of the Rural Information Center (RIC) as a nationwide information provider to rural officials and communities. This article focuses on RIC's services, information requests, and partnerships.


Quick Bibliography Series: QB 95-19. Updates QB 93-51. 260 citations in English from AGRICOLA Citations in this bibliography were entered in the AGRICOLA database between January 1988 - January 1995. By Patricia La Caille John. Rural Information Center. April 1995. NAL Call Number: aZ5071.N3 no.95-19


Quick Bibliography Series: QB 94-02. Updates QB 91-124. 209 citations in English from AGRICOLA Citations in this bibliography were entered in the AGRICOLA database between January 1980 - January 1993. By Patricia La Caille John. Rural Information Center. December 1993. NAL Call Number: aZ5071.N3 no.94-02


What Information and Funding Resources are Available for Volunteer and Nonprofit Organizations? Prepared by the Rural Information Center, 2006. Rural Information Center Publication Series; no. 64 2006.Beltsville, MD. Last Modified: July, 2013. Resources on how to start a volunteer and/or nonprofit organization, then recruit and manage volunteers are key in establishing and maintaining a successful program that provides a meaningful experience for both the volunteer and the organization.


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