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Laboratory Animal Facilities and Management

Animal Welfare Information Center
United States Department of Agriculture
National Agricultural Library

ISSN: 1052-5378

Quick Bibliography Series, QB 95-17
January 1985 - March 1995

541 citations from AGRICOLA
March 1995

Also see: Information Resources for Animal Facility Sanitation and Cage Wash, 2003

Compiled By:
D'Anna J.B. Jensen
Animal Welfare Information Center, Information Centers Branch
National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Research Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture
10301 Baltimore Ave., Beltsville, Maryland 20705-2351


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National Agricultural Library Cataloging Record:

 Jensen, D'Anna J.B.
   Laboratory animal facilities and management, January 1985-
 March 1995.
   (Quick bibliography series ; 95-17)
   1. Laboratory animals--Management--Bibliography. 2. Facility
 management--Bibliography. I. Title.
 aZ5071.N3 no.95-17
 

Search Strategy

 Set    Description
 
 S1     (LABORATORY OR EXPERIMENTAL)()ANIMAL??
 S2     (BREEDING OR MANAGEMENT OR HOUSING OR CAGE? OR CAGING
        OR FACILIT?)
 S3     S1 AND S2
 S4     S3 AND PY=1985:1995
 S5     RD (unique items)
 

 1                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.J55
 Breeding and care for wild woodchucks (Marmota monax) by
 indoor and outdoor housing
 Shiga, J.; Yamamoto, K.; Ito, M.; Koshimizu, K.
 Tokyo : Keio University School of Medicine; 1989 Apr.
 Jikken dobutsu; experimental animals v. 38 (2): p. 155-158.
 ill; 1989 Apr. Includes references.
 
 Language:  Japanese
 
 Descriptors: Marmot; Animal husbandry; Animal housing;
 Breeding; Carcinoma; Neoplasms; Disease models; Domestication
 
 
 2                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 1985 buyer's guide.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1985 Oct.
 Lab animal v. 13 (7): 93 p.; 1985 Oct.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Buyers' guides;
 Directories; Boxes; Cages; Equipment; Diets; Veterinary
 services
 
 
 3                                      NAL Call. No.: 41.8 AM3
 Abortion, stillbirth, neonatal death, and nutritional
 myodegeneration in a rabbit breeding colony.
 Yamini, B.; Stein, S.
 Schaumburg, Ill. : The Association; 1989 Feb15.
 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association v. 194
 (4): p. 561-562. ill; 1989 Feb15.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Abortion; Fetal death; Neonatal
 mortality; Nutritional muscular dystrophy; Symptoms; Vitamin e
 
 
 4                                     NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Acute restraint device for rhesus monkeys.
 Robbins, D.O.; Zwick, H.; Leedy, M.; Stearns, G.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1986 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 36 (1): p.
 68-70. ill; 1986 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Restraint of animals;
 Immobilization; Cages; Design
 
 
 5                                     NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Adrenal and body temperature changes in rabbits exposed to
 varying effective temperatures.
 Besch, E.L.; Brigmon, R.L.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (1): p.
 31-34; 1991 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Temperature; Body temperature; Adrenal
 glands; Stress; Corticosterone; Blood plasma
 
 Abstract:  Eight adult New Zealand White rabbits were exposed
 individually, in series, to each of 23 effective temperatures
 (teff) until body temperature (tb) increased 1.1 degree C or
 for a period of 2 hours. Body temperature was measured to the
 nearest 0.1 degree C using FM radio transmitters in the pre-
 test (baseline) condition and at 2 minute intervals during the
 test conditions where teff ranged between 21.7 and 34.7
 degrees C. The frequency at which the rabbits displayed a 1.1
 degree C rise in tb was related to the magnitude of the teff,
 with 100% of the rabbits manifesting this change at teff
 greater than 30.2 degrees C. At teff of 28.4 through 30.2
 degrees C, some, but not all, of the rabbits showed a 1.1
 degree C rise in tb whereas none displayed the 1.1 degree C
 rise in tb at teff below 28.4 degrees C. The mean time
 necessary for the 1.1 degree C rise in tb was negatively
 correlated (P < 0.01) to the magnitude of the teff. The
 significantly (P < 0.01) elevated plasma corticosterone in
 rabbits exhibiting 0.6 degrees C and 1.1 degree C rise in tb
 suggests that those animals were stressed physiologically by
 the experimental procedure. It is concluded that the
 conditions associated with increased tb induce physiological
 changes commonly associated with stressors and that the
 techniques reported herein should be useful in establishing
 upper environmental temperature limits for housing rabbits.
 
 
 6                                       NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Advances in the management of primates kept for biomedical
 research. Sainsbury, A.W.; London; Mew, J.A.; Purton, P.;
 Eaton, B.D.; Cooper, J.E. Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (2): p. 87-101. ill; 1990 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmosets; Macaca fascicularis; Laboratory
 rearing; Animal welfare; Cages; Diet; Restraint of animals;
 Identification; Medical research
 
 Abstract:  Changes in the management of colonies of Long-
 tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Common marmosets
 (Callithrix jacchus) kept atthe Royal College of Surgeons
 Research Establishment are outlined. Over the courseof a year
 the welfare of the macaques has been improved by a series of
 changesin their housing coupled with modifications in their
 diet. In addition a newsystem of chemically immobilizing the
 macaques has been advised. Advances in marmoset management
 have been less far reaching but a prototype of a new housing
 system is being built, a number of studies are inprogress
 aimed at enriching the environment and a change in diet has
 been carriedout. These developments are discussed in the
 context of increasingconcern over the need to house and manage
 primates under optimum conditions.
 
 
 7                                    NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 Adverse effects in animals and their relevance to refining
 scientific procedures.
 Morton, D.B.
 Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical
 Experiments; 1990 Nov.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 18: p. 29-39;
 1990 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  This paper highlights the areas in which
 refinement, with the specific aim of reducing laboratory
 animal pain, distress and anxiety, can be achieved. Good
 husbandry and housing which meet the animals' behavioural
 needs, careful and gentle handling, competence in carrying out
 scientific Procedures, and alleviation of any unwanted side-
 effects, are all of paramount importance. Whilst "suffering"
 cannot easily be tightly defined, it is essential to recognise
 when an animal is suffering so that its alleviation can be
 instigated.
 
 
 8                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Allergy to laboratory mice and rats: a review of its
 prevention, management, and treatment.
 Hunskaar, S.; Fosse, R.T.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1993 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 27 (3): p. 206-221; 1993 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Allergies; Laboratory animals
 
 Abstract:  Allergy to laboratory animals is reviewed from a
 management point of view. Personnel issues, medical therapy,
 legal aspects, animal house environments and work routines are
 discussed. Modern methods of medical treatments are presented
 but it is recommended that environmental control should be
 given priority over drugs. Several ventilation and building
 design systems are reviewed from an ALA viewpoint. New
 technology (including down-ventilated benches, ventilated
 cages) is reviewed and possible effectiveness analysed. These
 systems, though potentially of value, lack adequate testing
 under clinical conditions. We conclude that there are many
 clinically untested techniques that remain to be proven and
 whose efficacy has not been documented.
 
 
 9                                      NAL Call. No.: 41.8 AM3
 Alternatives to chronic restraint of nonhuman primates.
 Morton, W.R.; Knitter, G.H.; Smith, P.M.; Susor, T.G.;
 Schmitt, K. Schaumburg, Ill. : The Association; 1987 Nov15.
 Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association v. 191
 (10): p. 1282-1286. ill; 1987 Nov15.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Restraint of animals; Cages
 
 
 10                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Alternatives to continuous social housing.
 Bayne, K.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (4): p.
 355-359; 1991 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal housing; Environment; Enrichment
 
 Abstract:  Although social housing is desirable for social
 species of nonhuman primates, circumstances arise whereby
 social housing is precluded (for example, certain kinds of
 infectious disease or toxicologic research, when the health of
 the animal(s) would be compromised by social housing, and
 animals which respond behaviorally in an inappropriate manner
 to social housing). Nonsocial alternatives that provide
 increased environmental complexity to the home cage should
 then be considered. Nonsocial "environmental enrichment"
 schemes can be designed to enhance the expression of an
 individually housed nonhuman primate's locomotive/postural,
 manipulative, and foraging behaviors. In this way, nonsocial,
 but species-typical, behaviors can be promoted in the single
 cage housing condition.
 
 
 11                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Ambulatory electrocardiography (Holter monitoring) in caged
 monkeys. Vogel, A.P.; Jaax, G.P.; Tezak-Reid, T.M.; Baskin,
 S.I.; Bartholomew, J.L. London : Royal Society of Medicine
 Services; 1991 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 25 (1): p. 16-20; 1991 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Electrocardiography; Monitoring
 
 Abstract:  A swivel-tethering and jacket system was used in
 conjunction with vinyl patch electrodes and Holter recorders
 to obtain continuous ECG recordings in 12 rhesus monkeys on a
 long-term (12 day) study. Animals were custom-fitted with
 nylon mesh jackets that were connected to a swivel unit by a
 flexible, stainless steel tether. Lead wires from the chest
 electrodes passed through the tether to the electrical swivel
 apparatus located at the top of the cage. Wires from the upper
 part of the swivel were attached to a reel-to-reel Holter
 recorder. This technique was used to obtain 24-h continuous
 ECG recordings, which were later processed using a computer-
 assisted Holter analysis system.
 
 
 12                                   NAL Call. No.: HV4701.A34
 Animal boredom: is a scientific study of the subjective
 experiences of animals possible?.
 Wemelsfelder, F.
 Boston : Martinus Nijhoff Publishers; 1985, reprinted 1984.
 Advances in animal welfare science 1985).: p. 115-154; 1985,
 reprinted 1984. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Livestock; Poultry; Laboratory animals; Animal
 behavior; Animal housing; Animal welfare; Stress; Boredom
 
 
 13                                     NAL Call. No.: QH432.E9
 Animal breeding practice.
 Webb, A.J.
 Oxford, UK : CAB; 1989.
 Evolution and animal breeding : reviews on molecular and
 quantitative approaches in honour of Alan Robertson / edited
 by William G. Hill and Trudy F.C. Mackay. p. 195-202; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Animal breeding; Quantitative genetics;
 Selection; Genetic variation; Crossing; Population structure;
 Laboratory animals
 
 
 14                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Animal caging: is big necessarily better?.
 Bantin, G.C.; Sanders, P.D.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (1): p. 45-54. ill; 1989 Apr.  Literature
 review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Laboratory animals; Animal
 housing; Legislation; Animal welfare; Cage size
 
 
 15                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Animal census with off-the-shelf software.
 Coons, D.; Haesemeyer, J.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 Mar.
 Lab animal v. 15 (2): p. 49-50; 1986 Mar.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Censuses;
 Computer applications
 
 
 16                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Animal cubicles: questions, answers, options, opinions.
 Hessler, J.R.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1993 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 22 (4): p. 21-22, 24-25, 28-36; 1993 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing
 
 
 17                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Animal facilities: planning for flexibility.
 Graves, R.G.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1990 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 19 (6): p. 29-32, 37-40, 42, 44, 46, 48-50. ill;
 1990 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal housing; Laboratory animals
 
 
 18                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Animal facility portable sinks.
 Kirk, K.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 21 (2): p. 50-54; 1992 Feb.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory equipment; Mobile equipment
 
 
 19                                 NAL Call. No.: QL55.U5 1987
 The animal house: design, equipment and environmental
 control., 6th ed. Clough, G.
 London : Longman; 1987.
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of laboratory
 animals / edited by Trevor B. Poole; editorial assistant, Ruth
 Robinson. p. 108-143; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Structural
 design; Laboratory equipment; Environmental control
 
 
 20                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Animal house stock control based on bar-coded cage labels.
 Wootton, R.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1985 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 19 (4): p. 359-367. ill; 1985 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Information services;
 Inventories; Data collection; Computers; Records; Stocks;
 Animal husbandry
 
 
 21                                 NAL Call. No.: QL55.U5 1987
 Animal production and breeding methods., 6th ed.
 Festing, M.F.W.
 London : Longman; 1987.
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of laboratory
 animals / edited by Trevor B. Poole; editorial assistant, Ruth
 Robinson. p. 18-34; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal production; Breeding
 methods; Animal breeding
 
 
 22                                     NAL Call. No.: 470 SCI2
 Animal regulations: so far, so good.
 Holden, C.
 Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of
 Science; 1987 Nov13.
 Science v. 238 (4829): p. 880-882. ill; 1987 Nov13.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Regulations;
 Facilities; Laboratories; Animal welfare; Standards; Usda
 
 
 23                            NAL Call. No.: KF27.A33277 1990f
 Animal research facilities protection joint hearing before the
 Subcommittee on Department Operations, Research, and Foreign
 Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and
 Poultry of the Committee on Agriculture, House of
 Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, second session,
 February 28, 1990.
 United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture.
 Subcommittee on Department Operations, Research, and Foreign
 Agriculture; United States, Congress, House, Committee on
 Agriculture, Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry
 Washington [D.C.] : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the Supt. of
 Docs., Congressional Sales Office, U.S. G.P.O.,; 1991; Y 4.Ag
 8/1:101-52. iv, 176 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.  Distributed to some
 depository libraries in microfiche.  Serial no. 101-52.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Criminal procedure; Laboratories; Animal welfare;
 Laboratory animals
 
 
 24                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 "Animal research protocol management system".
 DeWees, D.L.; Silverman, J.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Oct.
 Lab animal v. 21 (9): p. 54-56, 58, 60; 1992 Oct.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal experiments; Computer software
 
 
 25                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Animal research review in an industrial facility.
 Knauff, D.R.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (special
 issue): p. 129-131; 1987 Jan.  In the series analytic:
 Effective animal care and use committees / edited by F.B.
 Orlans, R.C. Simmonds, W.J. Dodds.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pennsylvania; Laboratory animals; Animal
 research; Animal welfare; Regulations; Industry; Animal
 experiments; Committees
 
 
 26                         NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.738
 Animal Resource Facility training program a training program
 in laboratory animal care &amp; use..  Animal training videotape
 Manual for general information related to animal research
 Texas Tech University, Health Sciences Center
 Lubbock, Tex. : Texas Tech University, Health Sciences
 Center,; 1987. 1 videocassette (42 min.) : Db sd., col. ; 1/2
 in. + 1 manual.  VHS.  Title on label: Animal training
 videotape.  Title on manual: A manual of general information
 related to animal research.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare; Law and
 legislation; United States; Animal experimentation
 
 
 27                              NAL Call. No.: HV4930.W45 1993
 Animal use in Department of Defense research facilities an
 analysis of "Annual reports of research facility" filed with
 the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1986-1991.
 Weichbrod, Robert H.
 c1993; 1993.
 xii, 262 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.  Vita.  Includes
 bibliographical references (leaves 247-253).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal experimentation
 
 
 28                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Ankylosis of hock joints in group caged male B6C3F1 mice. Rao,
 G.N.; Lindsey, J.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (4): p.
 417-421. ill; 1988 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Strains; Pathogen free animals; Males;
 Cages; Joints (animal); Ankylosis; Hocks
 
 Abstract:  Enlarged hock joints were observed during 1983 in
 B6C3F1 mice of chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies
 sponsored by the National Toxicology Program (NTP).
 Subsequently, approximately 9,500 B5C3F1 mice on 32 NTP
 chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity studies were evaluated
 for this condition by clinical examination. Group caged male
 B6C3F1 mice had thickening and reduced mobility of the hock
 joints at prevalences of 1.2% up to 6 months of age; 23% at 6
 to 12 months of age; and 62% at 13 to 26 months of age. Group
 caged female B6C3F1 mice had a prevalence of 2% or less.
 Histologically, affected mice had periarticular exostoses on
 the bones of the hock joints, with formation of bony bridges
 around joints and deposition of new bone in joint spaces,
 resulting in partial or complete ankylosis. Individually caged
 male and female B6C3F1 mice were not affected. The cause of
 the ankylosis was not determined, but its occurrence in the
 NTP studies has been reduced by individual caging.
 
 
 29                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1I43
 Annotated bibliography on uncommonly used laboratory animals:
 mammals. Fine, J.; Quimby, F.W.; Greenhouse, D.D.
 Washington, D.C. : Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources,
 National Research Council; 1986.
 I.L.A.R. news v. 29 (4): p. 3A-38A. ill; 1986.  Literature
 review.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Mammals; Classification;
 Animal nutrition; Animal housing; Veterinary services
 
 
 30                                   NAL Call. No.: QL785.A725
 Anticipatory contrast as a measure of time horizons in the
 rat: some methodological determinants.
 Lucas, G.A.; Gawley, D.J.; Timberlake, W.
 Austin, Tex. : Psychonomic Society; 1988 Nov.
 Animal learning &amp; behavior v. 16 (4): p. 377-382; 1988 Nov. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Feeding behavior; Time; Measurement; Food
 intake; Saccharin; Methodology
 
 Abstract:  In three experiments, the time horizon over which
 the rat evaluates alternative feeding sources was
 investigated. The time horizon was measured by the suppression
 of intake of one incentive (a 0.15% saccharin solution) when a
 preferred alternative incentive (a 32% sucrose solution) was
 available but delayed . In Experiment 1, we found a direct
 function between the amount of saccharin intake and the delay
 time before access to 32% sucrose. Compared with intake for a
 saccharin-only control, saccharin intake was suppressed before
 4-min and 16-min sucrose delays, but not before a 32-min
 delay. Because previous work (Flaherty &amp; Checke, 1982) had
 reported suppression before a delay of nearly 32 min, in the
 subsequent experiments we examined factors that might account
 for this difference. In Experiment 2, we found that saccharin
 intake was suppressed before a 32-min delay interval when
 saccharin and sucrose solutions were presented in a bright-
 novel test environment but not when the same solutions were
 presented in the home cage. In Experiment 3, we found that the
 time between testing and subsequent postsession feeding could
 also affect the suppression of saccharin intake. Saccharin
 intake was suppressed when access to 32% sucrose was delayed
 by 32 min and the test situation was followed by immediate
 postsession feeding, but not when postsession feeding was
 delayed by 90 min. These results thus extend estimates of the
 rat's time horizon to at least 32 min, but indicate that the
 effective time horizon can vary, depending on the test
 situation.
 
 
 31                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 The application of embryo transfer and cryopreservation to
 commercial laboratory animal breeding. Cryopreservation of
 mouse strains by a quick freezing method.
 Dagnaes-Hansen, F.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 375-378; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Strains; Embryos (animal); Transfers;
 Freezing; Preservation
 
 
 32                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The application of scid mouse technology to questions in
 reproductive biology. Croy, B.A.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (2): p.
 123-126; 1993 Apr.  Paper presented at a conference entitled
 "The Scid Mouse in Biomedical and Agricultural Research,"
 August 5-7, 1992, Guelph, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Immune competence; Mice
 
 Abstract:  Mice expressing the scid gene have been used to
 study major questions in the field of reproductive immunology.
 Transfer of Mus caroli embryos to the uteri of pseudopregnant
 scid/scid mice disproved the hypothesis that antigen-specific
 immune rejection of fetuses was occurring in this model of
 midgestational pregnancy failure. The results of breeding
 studies of mice having the scid/scid.bg/bg genotype suggested
 that uterine lymphocytes have little or no role in promoting
 embryonic survival under pathogen-free conditions. Further,
 the results of in vitro studies using uterine lymphocytes from
 these immunodeficient mice suggested that the cytokines
 important for pregnancy success were not lymphocyte-derived.
 Xenogeneic engraftment of embryonic and uterine tissues into
 scid/scid and scid/scid.bg/bg mice is also successful and has
 the potential for facilitating studies of the fetomaternal
 interface in domestic animal species, such as cows and horses,
 as well as in humans.
 
 
 33                             NAL Call. No.: SF407.P7T49 1991
 Applied primate ecology: evaluation of environmental changes
 intended to promote psychological well-being., 1st ed.;.
 Erwin, J.M.
 Washington, DC : American Psychological Association ;; 1991.
 Through the looking glass: issues of psychological well-being
 in captive nonhuman primates / edited by Melinda A. Novak and
 Andrew J. Petto. p. 180-188; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal welfare; Environmental factors;
 Social environment; Cages
 
 
 34                                     NAL Call. No.: SF406.L2
 Are we ready for the future? Possibilities for laboratory
 animal science. Dayan, A.D.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services for Laboratory
 Animals; 1988. Laboratory Animal Science Association Silver
 Jubilee 1988 : collected papers to celebrate LASA's 25th
 anniversary / edited by J.H. Seamer. p. 36-42; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal experiments;
 Facilities; Research; Animal testing alternatives
 
 
 35                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Aspergillus rhinitis in Wistar (Crl:(WI)BR) rats.
 Rehm, S.; Waalkes, M.P.; Ward, J.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (2): p.
 162-166. ill; 1988 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Strains; Aspergillus fumigatus; Rhinitis;
 Histopathology
 
 Abstract:  In two separate 24 month studies on the
 carcinogenic effect of single cadmium chloride injections in
 male Wistar (CR1:(WI)BR) rats, a total of 22% (129/597) of
 animals studied histologically were found to have chronic
 suppurative rhinitis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. The
 diagnosis was based on characteristic conidial heads present
 in the sections, and positive methenamine-Grocott (GMS)
 staining of septate hyphae with dichotomous branching at
 angles of 45 degrees. Fungal hyphae balls, surrounded by a
 wall of neutrophilic granulocytes, were found in areas of the naso-
  and maxilloturbinates and occasionally caused complete
 blockage of the nasal passages. The underlying tissue showed
 an inflammatory response. In sections from 32 of the 129 cases
 (25% of the cases), epithelial necrosis and hemorrhage were
 indicative of fungal tissue invasion, but without
 dissemination to other organs. The infection rate was
 unaffected by the cadmium treatment or the location of rats in
 different cages. Positive antibody titers to Sendai and
 sialodacryoadenitis viruses suggested that transient
 inflammation of the upper respiratory tract rendered the
 mucosa susceptible to the fungal infection. The infection
 appeared to be sustained by growth around foreign bodies
 (hairs and plant material). Although focal squamous cell
 metaplasia of the respiratory epithelium with hyperplasia and
 hyperkeratosis occurred more frequently in rats with
 Aspergillus rhinitis, the incidence of tumors of the nasal
 cavities was not affected.
 
 
 36                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Assessing laboratory life for golden hamsters: social
 preference, caging selection, and human interaction.
 Arnold, C.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1994 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 23 (2): p. 34-37; 1994 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Golden hamsters; Social behavior; Cages; Floors;
 Man; Interactions; Handling
 
 
 37                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Assessment of discomfort in gallstone-bearing mice: a
 practical example of the problems encountered in an attempt to
 recognize discomfort in laboratory animals.
 Beynen, A.C.; Baumans, V.; Bertens, A.P.M.G.; Havenaar, R.;
 Hesp, A.P.M.; Zutphen, L.F.M. van
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (1): p. 35-42. ill; 1987 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Biliary calculi; Pain; Symptoms; Animal
 husbandry; Animal housing; Diets
 
 Abstract:  In order to obtain practical experience on the
 recognition, assessment and evaluation of discomfort in
 laboratory animals, the degree of discomfort was studied in
 gallstone-free and gallstone-bearing mice. Out of nine
 parameters to which scores were assigned per individual mouse,
 only the response to palpation of the right hypochrondrium was
 found to score significantly higher in gallstone-bearing mice.
 That is, the incidence of squeaking and the magnitude of
 muscular contractions were significantly higher in these
 animals compared with the gallstone-free mice. The stance of
 the gallstone-bearing mice also tended to be abnormal,
 although the difference between gallstone-free and gallstone-
 bearing animals did not reach statistical significance.
 Although this study does not prove unequivocally that the
 induction of gallstones per se causes discomfort or pain in
 mice, we tentatively conclude that it does. We feel that this
 should be taken into account in any projected work in which
 gallstone induction in animals may occur. There was
 considerable between-assessor variation in the assignment of
 scores to the variables used to assess discomfort, including
 the response to palpation. It is concluded that the selection
 of parameters and the experience and/or attitude of the
 assessor are critically important when the magnitude of
 discomfort, if any, is assessed in experimental animals.
 
 
 38                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Atherosclerosis in modified WHHL rabbits.
 Richards, T.; Horlock, H.; Gallagher, P.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1986 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 37 (1): p. 1-6; 1986 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbit feeding; Diets; Atherosclerosis; Breeding
 programs; Hyperlipemia
 
 
 39                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 An attempt to eradicate Herpesvirus simiae from a rhesus
 monkey breeding colony.
 Sauber, J.J.; Fanton, J.W.; Harvey, R.C.; Golden, J.G.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (5): p.
 458-462; 1992 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Herpesviridae
 
 
 40                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 The automated animal care facility.
 Miller, L.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1990 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 19 (6): p. 54-56; 1990 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Automation
 
 
 41                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Automation of the animal care facility.
 Clark, B.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1993 Oct.
 Lab animal v. 22 (10): p. 27-32; 1993 Oct.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Information processing
 
 
 42                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Avoiding undue cortisol responses to venipuncture in adult
 male rhesus macaques.
 Reinhardt, V.; Cowley, D.; Eisele, S.; Scheffler, J.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (2): p. 83-86; 1991 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Blood sampling; Stress;
 Hydrocortisone; Cages
 
 Abstract:  Six single-caged adult male rhesus monkeys were
 venipunctured in their homecage and, on a different day, away
 from their cage in a restraint apparatus. The animals were
 habituated to both procedures and readily presented a leg for
 blood collection without being mechanically immobilized. The
 time required to draw a blood sample was less than 2 minutes
 for both procedures. Serum cortisol concentrations were
 equivalent in blood samples collected at 1200 h when the
 animals were in the restraint apparatus (average = 15.3 +/-
 4.4 microgram dl) and when the animals were in their homecages
 (average = 15.7 +/- 2.4 microgram/dl; p > 0.1). Cortisol
 concentrations during a second venipuncture at 1215 h were
 significantly higher during blood collection in the restraint
 apparatus (average = 23.2 +/- 4.7 microgram/dl) than during
 blood collection in the homecage (average = 17.7 +/- 5.0
 microgram/dl; p < 0.05). The magnitude of cortisol increase
 during the 15 minutes was significant (52%; p < 0.025) when
 the males were venipunctured in the restraint apparatus but
 not (13%; p > 0.1) when they were venipunctured in the
 homecage. It was concluded that venipuncture per se was not a
 physiologically distressing event for the males. It became
 distressing only when it was associated with a temporary
 removal from the homecage. In-homecage venipuncture is
 therefore recommended as an alternative to venipuncture in a
 restraint apparatus for those research protocols that require
 blood samples from undisturbed experimental monkeys.
 
 
 43                                   NAL Call. No.: SF406.3.B4
 Behavior and well-being of laboratory animals.
 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science, [1986?]; 1986.
 15 p. ; 28 cm. (American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science monograph series ; 1).  Presented at the 1986 Annual
 Meeting in Chicago, Illinois.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Housing; Congresses; Animal
 behavior; Congresses; Animal welfare; Congresses
 
 
 44                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Behavioral and physiologic effects of inapparent wound
 infection in rats. Bradfield, J.F.; Schachtman, T.R.;
 McLaughlin, R.M.; Steffen, E.K. Cordova, Tenn. : American
 Association for Laboratory Animal Science; 1992 Dec.
 Laboratory animal science v. 42 (6): p. 572-578; 1992 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Wounds; Latent infections
 
 Abstract:  There is a common notion that rats are resistant to
 postoperative wound infection because many recover from
 surgery performed under nonsterile conditions. As a result,
 nonaseptic surgical techniques are used commonly in rat
 surgery. Our aim was to determine if these techniques cause
 wound infection and, if so, whether or not the infection,
 inapparent to casual observation, creates measurable changes
 in rat physiology and behavior. Rats subjected to craniotomies
 or laparotomies and inoculated with 10(8) Staphylococcus
 aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa or sterile saline were tested
 for open-field activity, freezing behavior, home-cage behavior
 score, and wheel-running activity. Physiologic indices
 included lactate dehydrogenase, blood glucose, plasma
 fibrinogen, complete blood counts, wound bacterial counts and
 histology scores, body temperature, and body weight. Although
 no clinical signs were detected by postoperative observation,
 rats inoculated with bacteria were significantly less active
 in the open field and the duration of freezing behavior was
 shorter. Plasma fibrinogen, serum glucose, total white blood
 cell counts, and wound histology scores were significantly
 altered in the bacteria-inoculated rats. These findings
 underscore the need for sterile techniques in rat surgery to
 avoid confounding experimental data.
 
 
 45                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.N48
 Behavioral enrichment for primates: what are the options?.
 Heath, S.J.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Center; 1987.
 Newsletter - Scientists Center for Animal Welfare v. 9 (1): p.
 11-12. ill; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Institutions; Animal experiments;
 Facilities; Animal behavior; Television
 
 
 46                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Behaviour, housing and welfare of non-human primates.
 Poole, T.B.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 231-237; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal behavior; Animal welfare; Animal
 housing; Cages; Laboratory rearing
 
 
 47                                     NAL Call. No.: QL750.A6
 The behaviour of group penned and individually caged
 laboratory rabbits. Podberscek, A.L.; Blackshaw, J.K.;
 Beattie, A.W.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Jan.
 Applied animal behaviour science v. 28 (4): p. 353-363; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Group behavior; Pens; Cages; Animal
 behavior
 
 
 48                                     NAL Call. No.: 470 SCI2
 Billion dollar price tag for new animal rules.
 Holden, C.
 Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of
 Science; 1988 Nov04.
 Science v. 242 (4879): p. 662-663; 1988 Nov04.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Dogs; Primates; Facilities; Costs;
 Regulations; Law; Animal welfare; Exercise; Cages; Medical
 research
 
 
 49                                     NAL Call. No.: QH432.E9
 The biochemical control of quantitative traits.
 Bulfield, G.
 Oxford, UK : CAB; 1989.
 Evolution and animal breeding : reviews on molecular and
 quantitative approaches in honour of Alan Robertson / edited
 by William G. Hill and Trudy F.C. Mackay. p. 227-231; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal breeding; Biochemistry; Molecular
 genetics; Quantitative traits; Chickens; Mice
 
 
 50                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Birth of a hemophilic dog colony.
 Tinlin, S.J.; Brosseau, L.D.; Giles, A.R.; Greenwood, R.;
 Greenwood, P.; Hoogendoorn, H.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 127-131. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Management; Breeding programs; Facilities;
 Hemophilia
 
 
 51                         NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.558
 Breaking barriers produced by People for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
 Washington, D.C. : PETA,; 1986.
 1 videocassette (16 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  VHS format. 
 A PETA video.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animals, Treatment of; Laboratory animals;
 Housing; Animal experimentation; Animal welfare
 
 
 52                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A breeding colony of cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).
 Snowdon, C.T.; Savage, A.; McConnell, P.B.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (5): p.
 477-480; 1985 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Animal breeding methods; Animal
 housing; Handling; Callithricidae
 
 
 53                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.L28
 Breeding, housing and care of laboratory animals.
 Solleveld, H.A.; McAnulty, P.; Ford, J.; Peters, P.W.J.; Tesh,
 J. Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1986.
 Laboratory animals : laboratory animal models for domestic
 animal production / edited by E.J. Ruitenberg and P.W.J.
 Peters. p. 1-46. ill; 1986. (World animal science. C,
 Production-system approach ; 2.).  Literature review. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Animal
 welfare; Animal breeding; Breeding programs; Germ free
 husbandry; Nutritional state; Cage rearing; Zoonoses
 
 
 54                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Breeding of the gad-mdx mouse: influence of genetically
 induced denervation on dystrophic muscle fibers.
 Suh, J.G.; Yamazaki, A.; Tomita, T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (1): p.
 42-46; 1994 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Mutants; Animal breeding; Genes; Muscle
 fibers; Muscular dystrophy; Disease models; Animal proteins;
 Creatine kinase; Enzyme activity; Spinal cord
 
 
 55                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Breeding of wild-caught rodent Cricetidae Holochilus
 brasiliensis under laboratory conditions.
 Mello, D.A.
 London : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1986 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 20 (3): p. 195-196; 1986 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Brazil; Rodents; Animal breeding methods; Animal
 husbandry
 
 
 56                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The breeding of Xenopus laevis on a large scale in the
 laboratory. Davys, J.S.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1986 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 37 (3): p. 217-223. ill; 1986 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Toads; Animal breeding; Animal housing;
 Laboratory rearing
 
 
 57                                  NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9C56
 Breeding primates in zoos.
 King, N.E.; Mitchell, G.
 New York : A.R. Liss, 1986-; 1986.
 Comparative primate biology. v. 2, pt. B p. 219-261; 1986. 
 Volume 2, Part B: Behavior, cognition, and motivation / edited
 by G. Mitchell and J. Erwin. Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal breeding; Estrous cycle;
 Zoological gardens; Genera; Species
 
 
 58                               NAL Call. No.: RB125.C68 1985
 Breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen
 miniature swine. Glodek, P.
 New York : Plenum Press; 1986.
 Swine in biomedical research / edited by M.E. Tumbleson. p.
 23-37; 1986. Proceedings of a conference on Swine in
 Biomedical Research, June 17-20, 1985, Columbia, Missouri. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Boars; Sows; Animal breeding; Breeding programs;
 Pig breeds; Litter size
 
 
 59                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A built-in perch for primate squeeze cages.
 Watson, D.S.B.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (4): p.
 378-379; 1991 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Cages; Perches; Usage; Sex differences
 
 
 60                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Bytes in the animal house.
 Fenn, C.; Howard, B.R.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (3): p. 203-209; 1990 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory rearing; Computer software; Record
 keeping
 
 Abstract:  The animal unit like any other production system,
 is subjected to external constraints. To avoid breeding
 animals surplus to requirements, to detect early changes in
 reproductive performance and to ensure financial equilibrium
 regular examination of many records is required. A computer
 programme has been developed to present, weekly, a series of
 performance figures which greatly assist the unit manager in
 achieving this surveillance. The programme is written for an
 inexpensive IBM compatible computer (Amstrad 1512). Basic is
 very widely understood and although slow, allows easy
 modification to suit changes in requirements or to interface
 with current recording practices. Animal technicians are urged
 to become more familiar with computers and to be prepared to
 use them as an aid to good husbandry.
 
 
 61                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Cage design and configuration for an arboreal species of
 primate. Williams, L.E.; Abee, C.R.; Barnes, S.R.; Ricker,
 R.B.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (3): p.
 289-291; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Species; Squirrel monkeys; Cage size;
 Design; Animal housing; Building materials
 
 Abstract:  The squirrel monkey (genus Saimiri) is an arboreal
 primate from equatorial South America. This species forms
 large social groups that consist of multiple females and males
 of varying ages, from infant to adult. As the use of squirrel
 monkeys in research continues to grow, an understanding of
 optimal cage design and environment is essential. The
 University of South Alabama Primate Research Laboratory houses
 a breeding colony of 350 squirrel monkeys. Each group cage,
 measuring 4.5 x 2.5 x 1.5 meters, can contain up to 20
 animals. A breeding group consists of one adult male, eight to
 ten females, and varying numbers of infant and juvenile
 animals. In order to determine the most suitable cage
 environment for the squirrel monkey, a series of studies were
 carried out to compare various perch materials and cage
 configurations. Squirrel monkeys preferred a poly-vinyl-
 chloride pipe perch (rigid) over rope perches (non-rigid).
 When provided with multiple levels of perches, all levels were
 used. Males tended to distribute their activities randomly at
 different levels. In a two tiered perch arrangement, females
 concentrated 67% of their social activity on the top tier. In
 a triple tier configuration, females concentrated 66% of their
 travel on the top tier. These results indicate that by
 creating a cage environment with multiple tiers of horizontal
 perches the effective cage space can be doubled or tripled.
 This provides an effective means of reducing population
 density without enlarging the dimensions of the cage or
 reducing social group size.
 
 
 62                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Cage design and configuration for arboreal reptiles.
 Mason, R.T.; Hoyt, R.F. Jr; Pannell, L.K.; Wellner, E.F.;
 Demeter, B. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1991 Jan. Laboratory animal science
 v. 41 (1): p. 84-86; 1991 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Reptiles; Cages; Design
 
 
 63                                   NAL Call. No.: 448.8 J824
 Cage design for the confinement of deer and goats infested
 with ectoparasites. Cooksey, L.M.; Davey, R.B.
 Lawrence, Kan. : American Society of Parasitologists; 1988
 Oct. The Journal of parasitology v. 74 (5): p. 891-893. ill;
 1988 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Goats; Odocoileus Virginianus; Cages; Design;
 Laboratory rearing; Ectoparasitoses; Boophilus annulatus
 
 
 64                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Cage design reduces emotionality in mice.
 Chamove, A.S.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (3): p. 215-219; 1989 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Layout; Animal behavior; Animal
 welfare; Adrenal glands; Weight; Activity; Stress
 
 Abstract:  To see if a more natural cage design would alter
 the reactivity of laboratory mice, 192 mice were reared in
 cages with (1) no dividers, (2) five vertical dividers, (3)
 nine vertical dividers, or (4) nine vertical dividers and one
 horizontal platform. The mice preferred the most complex
 cages, and on almost all measures they were less emotional
 when reared in the more complex cages. Results suggest that a
 more natural housing environment would lead to healthier
 animals.
 
 
 65                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Cage enrichment for female New Zealand white rabbits.
 Brooks, D.L.; Huls, W.; Leamon, C.; Thomson, J.; Parker, J.;
 Twomey, S. New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1993
 May.
 Lab animal v. 22 (5): p. 30, 32-33, 36, 38; 1993 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Cages; Enrichment
 
 
 66                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A cage for the ferret.
 Scharmann, W.; Wolff, D.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (1): p. 43-47. ill; 1987 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ferrets; Animal husbandry; Cages; Design;
 Handling
 
 Abstract:  A cage for ferrets is described that consists of a
 plastic box with a metal sliding-grill top and metal front
 lattice. It contains a new feeding system using dishes that
 can be removed without opening the cage. The cages are kept in
 mobile racks and are commercially available.
 
 
 67                                NAL Call. No.: Z7996.P85C353
 Cages, corrals &amp; consequences, housing of monkeys in the lab
 colony a bibliography, 1976-1986..  Cages, corrals and
 consequences, housing the monkeys in the lab colony
 Caminiti, Benella
 University of Washington, Primate Information Center
 Seattle : Primate Information Center, Regional Primate
 Research Center, University of Washington,; 1986.
 19 p. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  "Supported in part by Grant No.
 RR-00166 from the National Institutes of Health."--Cover. 
 November 1986.  Includes index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Housing; Bibliography; Laboratory
 animals; Housing; Bibliography; Animal welfare
 
 
 68                                 NAL Call. No.: Slide no.237
 Caging systems, bedding materials, &amp; environmental
 considerations for laboratory rodents [Stanley P. Liebenberg
 and Lynn Dahm] ; developed by Northwest Committee for Training
 in Laboratory Animal Care in collabtoration with H.S. Center
 for Educational Resources, University of Washington.
 Liebenberg, Stanley P.; Dahm, Lynn
 University of Washington, Northwest Committee for Training in
 Laboratory Animal Care, University of Washington, Health
 Sciences Center for Educational Resources
 Seattle, WA : Distributed by H.S. Center for Educational
 Resources, SB-56, University of Washington,; 1985.
 53 slides : col. + 1 sound cassette (22 min., 12 sec. : 1 7/8
 ips., mono.) + guide. (Training series in laboratory animal
 care ; LAC-8302).  Sound accompaniment compatible for manual
 and automatic operation.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Housing; Laboratory animals;
 Ecology; Rodents as laboratory animals; Rodents; Housing;
 Animal welfare
 
 
 69                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.C22C36
 Caging systems for dogs under the new standards of the animal
 welfare act. Britz, W.E. Jr
 Bethesda, MD : Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1990 Jan.
 Canine research environment / edited by Joy A. Mench and Lee
 Krulisch. p. 48-52; 1990 Jan.  Paper presented at a conference
 held by the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, June 22,
 1989, Bethesda, Md. Question and answer session p. 51-52.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Dogs; Cages; Animal welfare; Legislation
 
 
 70                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Calomys laucha (Rodentia, Cricetidae): growth and breeding in
 laboratory conditions.
 Hodara, V.L.; Espinosa, M.B.; Merani, M.S.; Quintans, C.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (4): p. 340-344; 1989 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Calomys; Laboratory animals; Animal husbandry;
 Growth; Animal breeding; Reproductive efficiency
 
 Abstract:  The husbandry and breeding of Calomys laucha
 (Rodentia, Cricetidae) in captivity are described. Growth
 curves based on body weight and length showed statistical
 differences between sexes after 45 days, males being heavier
 than females. The overall reproductive efficiency was 53.4%
 but birth rate was depressed during winter. Gestation length
 was 21 +/- 1 days and females exhibited postpartum oestrus
 with a 3-7 day implantation delay (51%). Litter size was 5.3
 +/- 1.1 (n = 34). Pup survival at weaning was 84.9%. Mean life
 span in laboratory conditions was 13.5 months and a cumulative
 mortality of 90% was reached at 27-28 months of age.
 
 
 71                                 NAL Call. No.: QL55.U5 1987
 The canary and other passerine cage birds., 6th ed.
 Keymer, I.F.
 London : Longman; 1987.
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of laboratory
 animals / edited by Trevor B. Poole; editorial assistant, Ruth
 Robinson. p. 687-700; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Aviary birds; Canaries;
 Biology; Animal husbandry; Laboratory methods; Disease control
 
 
 72                                  NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9C86
 Captive breeding in a source country.
 Else, J.G.
 New York : Van Nostrand Reinhold; 1986.
 Current perspectives in primate biology / edited by David M.
 Taub and Frederick A. King. p. 79-85; 1986.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kenya; Cercopithecidae; Breeding programs;
 Research institutes
 
 
 73                           NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9P6713 1984
 Captive breeding of callitrichids: a comparison of
 reproduction and propagation in different species.
 Stevenson, M.F.
 Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] : Cambridge University Press; 1986.
 Primate ecology and conservation / edited by James G. Else,
 Phyllis C. Lee. p. 301-313; 1986.  Paper presented at the
 "Proceedings of the Tenth Congress of the International
 Primatological Society," July 1984, Nairobi, Kenya. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Callithricidae; Animal breeding; Reproduction;
 Endangered species; Laboratory animals
 
 
 74                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The captive management of a breeding colony of Ryuku mice (Mus
 caroli). Castle, J.P.; Marshall, P.E.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (3): p. 191-196; 1990 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: South asia; Mus; Wild strains; Laboratory rearing
 
 Abstract:  Ryuku mice (Mus caroli) are a strain of wild mouse,
 which are indigenous throughout Southern Asia, including the
 Ryuku Islands from where their name originates. We were
 requested to set up and maintain a colony because they have
 different D.N.A. properties from the common laboratory mouse
 (Mus musculus). This enables a unique cell marking technique
 to be used, which in this instance is being applied to the
 study of tooth and gum development.
 
 
 75                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Care and management of dogs with colostomies.
 Rogers, D.W.; Tenney, J.B.; Perry, F.W.; Caldwell, F.L.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 421-433. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Colostomy; Management; Animal welfare;
 Treatment
 
 
 76                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Care and management of new-born formula-fed cynomolgus monkeys
 for diarrhoea studies.
 Yap, K.L.; Awang, A.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (1): p. 5-9; 1989 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Newborn animals; Laboratory rearing;
 Animal housing; Animal feeding; Feed formulation; Disease
 models; Diarrhea
 
 Abstract:  This paper describes various aspects in the care
 and management of new-born formula-fed cynomolgus monkeys used
 for diarrhoea studies. Emphasis was placed on maintaining a
 healthy gastrointestinal tract. The procedures described in
 this report enabled infant monkeys to be reared in a healthy,
 diarrhoea-free state.
 
 
 77                              NAL Call. No.: SF406.C35  1992
 The Care and use of amphibians, reptiles, and fish in
 research. Schaeffer, Dorcas O.; Kleinow, Kevin M.; Krulisch,
 Lee
 Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, Louisiana State
 University (Baton Rouge, La.), School of Veterinary Medicine
 Bethesda, Md. (4805 St. Elmo Ave., Bethesda 20814) :
 Scientists Center for Animal Welfare,; 1992.
 vii, 196 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Proceedings from a SCAW/LSUSVM-
 sponsored conference ... held April 8-9, 1991 in New Orleans,
 Louisiana ...  November 1992.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Amphibians as laboratory animals; Reptiles as
 laboratory animals; Fish as laboratory animals
 
 
 78                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Care and welfare of pre-weaning beagle puppies in a commercial
 breeding colony.
 Goodfellow, K.G.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (1): p. 49-55; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Puppies; Laboratory rearing; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  Developments leading to improved puppy care and
 welfare are constantly being sought in the breeding colony.
 New ideas about environmental control, pen design, feeding
 regimes, husbandry and staff training have been introduced and
 evaluated. The success of each change cannot easily be proved
 as improvements in puppy health depend upon so many factors.
 However as a result of a complete care and welfare programme
 there have been fewer health problems and lower pre-weaning
 loss, in our colony.
 
 
 79                                    NAL Call. No.: SF406.S64
 The care, breeding and management of experimental animals for
 research in the tropics.
 Smith, John B.,; Mangkoewidjojo, Soesanto
 Canberra : International Development Program, of Australian
 Universities and College,; 1987.
 ix, 257 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.  Bibliography: p. [243]-257.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Tropics; Laboratory animals;
 Tropics; Care and treatment; Laboratory animals; Breeding;
 Tropics; Animal welfare
 
 
 80                                      NAL Call. No.: F591.J6
 The care of captive animals: a historical perspective.
 Brewer, N.R.
 Manhattan, Kan. : The Journal; 1988 Jan.
 Journal of the West v. 27 (1): p. 52-60. ill; 1988 Jan.  In
 the series analytic: Veterinary medicine in the West / edited
 by O.H.V. Stalheim. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Capture of animals; Zoo
 animals; History; Facilities; Biographies; Veterinary practice
 
 
 81                         NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.971
 Carnivores basic needs, handling and care.
 Morgan, Ronald L.
 American College of Toxicology, Meeting_1990 :_Orlando,
 Fla.),Production Plus, Inc
 Symposium: Animal Welfare Compliance for Study Directors 1990
 : Orlando, Fla. Closter, N.J. : Production Plus, Inc.,
 [1990?]; 1990.
 1 videocassette (31 min., 37 sec.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  VHS. 
 Videotape of a presentation at Symposium: Animal Welfare
 Compliance for Study Directors ; presented at the Eleventh
 Annual Meeting of the American College of Toxicology, Orlando,
 Fla., Oct. 1990.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare; Dogs as
 laboratory animals; Cats as laboratory animals; Ferrets as
 laboratory animals; Minks as laboratory animals
 
 Abstract:  The basic needs of dogs and cats including air,
 food, water, environmental controls and social interaction are
 presented. Available guidelines, regulations, resource
 information and training manuals are presented. Methods of
 disease prevention, identification, housing and exercise are
 discussed. The basic care and handling of farrets and mink is
 also covered.
 
 
 82                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Causes and preventive measures of pre-weaning deaths in a New
 Zealand White rabbit breeding colony.
 Barry, M.P.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1994 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technicians v. 45 (2): p. 111-117; 1994 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Neonatal mortality; Preweaning period;
 Etiology; Prevention; Laboratory rearing; Cages; Design
 
 
 83                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The cellular and molecular pathogenesis of coronaviruses.
 Compton, S.R.; Barthold, S.W.; Smith, A.L.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (1): p.
 15-28; 1993 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Coronavirus; Pathogenesis
 
 Abstract:  Coronaviruses cause a wide spectrum of diseases in
 humans and animals but generally fall into two classes, with
 respiratory or enteric tropisms. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV)
 and rat coronaviruses are the virus most frequently
 encountered in the laboratory animal setting. This review
 focuses primarily on the cellular and molecular aspects of MHV
 pathogenesis. The high mutation and recombination rates of
 coronaviruses lead to a diverse, ever-changing population of
 MHV stains. The spike (S) protein is the most variable
 coronavirus protein and is responsible for binding to cell
 surface receptors, inducing cell fusion and humoral and
 cellular immunity. Differences within the S protein of
 different MHV strains have been linked to their variable
 tropisms. Since immunity to MHV is strain-specific,
 seropositive mice can be reinfected with different strains of
 MHV. Natural infections with MHV are acute, with persistence
 occurring at the population level, not within an individual
 mouse, unless it is immunocompromised. Age, genotype,
 immunologic status of the mouse, and MHV strain influence the
 type and severity of disease caused by MHV. Interference with
 research by MHV has been reported primarily in the fields of
 immunology and tumor biology and may be a reflection of MHV's
 capacity to grow in several types of immune cells. While many
 methods are available to diagnose coronavirus infection.
 serologic tests, primarily ELISA and IFA, are the most
 commonly used. MHV is best managed on a preventive basis.
 Elimination of MHV from a population requires cessation of
 breeding and halting the introduction of naive mice into the
 population.
 
 
 84                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Centralisation--decentralisation: failure-success.
 Hoof, J.A.P. van
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 75-80; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Management; Technicians; Work
 organization; Values
 
 
 85                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Challenging conventional wisdom for housing monkeys.
 Crockett, C.M.; Bowden, D.M.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1994 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 23 (2): p. 29-33; 1994 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Animal housing; Animal welfare; Cage
 size; Social interaction; Environment; Enrichment
 
 
 86                                     NAL Call. No.: 470 SCI2
 Chimps and research.
 King, F.A.
 Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of
 Science; 1988 Dec02.
 Science v. 242 (4883): p. 1227; 1988 Dec02.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Chimpanzee; Medical research; Fetus;
 Tissues; Endangered species; Regulations; Breeding programs
 
 
 87                                   NAL Call. No.: 500 AM322A
 Chimps in research--responding to a growing nationwide
 shortage, federal agencies are developing a controversial plan
 to manage chimpanzees. Fox, J.L.
 Arlington, Va. : The Institute; 1985 Feb.
 BioScience - American Institute of Biological Sciences v. 35
 (2): p. 75-76; 1985 Feb.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Chimpanzee; Animal
 husbandry; Animal breeding
 
 
 88                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Choices in facility computerization.
 Hardesty, J.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1994 Jul.
 Lab animal v. 23 (7): p. 33-36; 1994 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Management; Computer
 software; Computer hardware
 
 
 89                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Chronic spinal cord-injured cats: surgical procedures and
 management. Roy, R.R.; Hodgson, J.A.; Lauretz, S.D.; Pierotti,
 D.J.; Gayek, R.J.; Edgerton, V.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (4): p.
 335-343; 1992 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cats; Animal models; Spine; Trauma
 
 
 90                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Clinical management of spontaneous diabetes mellitus in the BB
 rat. Olson, G.A.; Toth, L.; Hinson, A.; Bursi, J.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1990 Mar.
 Lab animal v. 19 (2): p. 31-34; 1990 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Diabetes mellitus; Laboratory rearing; Drug
 therapy; Medical treatment; Insulin
 
 
 91                                  NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 A closed colony of squirrel monkeys for laboratory studies.
 Salzen, E.A.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 115-134.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Squirrel monkeys; Laboratory rearing; Animal
 housing; Cages; Handling; Exercise; Animal feeding; Animal
 breeding; Animal behavior
 
 
 92                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 A closed ileal loop technique for microbiological testing in
 piglets. Thornbury, J.; Carolan, B.; Frogley, J.; Sibbons, P.;
 Hardy, S. Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (2): p. 71-80. ill; 1990 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Piglets; Ileum; Anastomosis; Enterotoxins;
 Testing; Animal models
 
 Abstract:  The complete technical procedure for the formation
 of closed ileal loops is described for enterotoxicity testing
 in the piglet. This procedure includesa primary end-to-end
 anastamosis of the remaining non-looped bowel to provide best
 physiological parameters as possible conditions of test and to
 facilitate longterm survival. Closed ileal loop formation with
 primary anastamosis of theremaining bowel to provide gut
 continuity is a feasible procedure for short and longterm
 enterotoxicity testing in the piglet.
 
 
 93                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Clostridium difficile typhlitis associated with cecal mucosal
 hyperplasia in Syrian hamsters.
 Ryden, E.B.; Lipman, N.S.; Taylor, N.S.; Rose, R.; Fox, J.G.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (6): p.
 553-558; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hamsters; Clostridium difficile; Bacterial
 toxins; Typhlitis; Mortality; Diarrhea; Cecum; Histopathology
 
 Abstract:  A sudden increase in mortality occurred in a closed
 breeding colony of Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). The
 colony consisted of approximately 40 hamsters, 8 of which were
 affected. Four adult males died suddenly. One pregnant female
 and one weanling died after having been observed as depressed
 for 1 day and 2 weeks respectively. One weanling and one adult
 male were euthanized. All affected hamsters had signs of
 diarrhea. At necropsy, hemorrhagic fluid-filled ceca were
 noted in five of eight animals. Clostridium difficile
 cytotoxin B was present in high titers [10-3 to 10-8] in cecal
 contents of six of six animals tested, whereas C. difficile
 culture yielded positive results in only one of six animals.
 Histopathologically, findings consistent with Clostridium-
 induced typhlitis including necrosis, epithelial denudation,
 vascular congestion, and hemorrhage were present in six of six
 ceca evaluated. In addition, signs of a more chronic disease
 process included cecal mucosal hyperplasia in five of six
 hamsters. A silver stain of cecal hyperplastic mucosa for
 intracellular organisms including Campylobacter-like organisms
 was negative in all affected hamsters. Antibiotics had not
 been administrated to any hamster in this colony, nor had the
 affected animals been experimentally manipulated. Testing for
 antibiotic residues in the feed was negative, and C. difficile
 was not isolated from feed, water, or feces of unaffected
 hamsters. Thus C. difficile-induced typhlitis should be
 included in the differential diagnosis of deaths in hamsters
 which have no clinical histories of prior antibiotic
 administration or experimental manipulation. The diagnosis can
 be confirmed by the presence of C. difficile cytotoxin. The
 relationship of cecal mucosal hyperplasia and proliferation of
 toxigenic C. difficile requires further study.
 
 
 94                                  NAL Call. No.: SF406.3.C58
 Code of practice for the housing and care of animals used in
 scientific procedures.
 London : H.M.S.O.,; 1989.
 v, 33 p. ; 30 cm.  Presented pursuant to Act Eliz. II 1986
 C.14 Section 21 (Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986). 
 Includes bibliographical references (p. 29-32).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Housing; Law and legislation;
 Great Britain; Animal welfare; Law and legislation; Great
 Britain; Laboratory animals; Law and legislation; Great
 Britain
 
 
 95                                    NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Combined simian hemorrhagic fever and Ebola virus infection in
 cynomolgus monkeys.
 Dalgard, D.W.; Hardy, R.J.; Pearson, S.L.; Pucak, G.J.;
 Quander, R.V.; Zack, P.M.; Peters, C.J.; Jahrling, P.B.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (2): p.
 152-157; 1992 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Virginia; Macaca fascicularis; Ebola virus;
 Viruses; Mixed infections; Symptoms; Outbreaks; Public health;
 Case reports
 
 Abstract:  Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus and a new
 strain of Ebola virus were isolated concurrently in recently
 imported cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) being
 maintained in a quarantine facility. Ebola virus had never
 been isolated in the U.S. previously and was presumed to be
 highly pathogenic for humans. A chronology of events including
 measures taken to address the public health concerns is
 presented. The clinicopathologic features of the disease were
 abrupt anorexia, splenomegaly, marked elevations of lactate
 dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate
 aminotransferase, with less prominent elevations of blood urea
 nitrogen, creatinine, and other serum chemistry parameters.
 Histologically, fibrin deposition, hemorrhage, and necrosis of
 lymphoid cells and reticular mononuclear phagocytes were
 present in the spleens of SHF and of Ebola virus-infected
 animals. Intravascular fibrin thrombi and hemorrhage were also
 present in the renal medulla and multifocally in the
 gastrointestinal tract. Necrosis of lymphoid and epithelial
 cells was occasionally noted in the gastrointestinal tract.
 The histopathologic findings considered specific for Ebola
 virus infection include hepatocellular necrosis, necrosis of
 the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex, and interstitial
 pneumonia, all of which were generally associated with the
 presence of 1 to 4 micro intracytoplasmic amphophilic
 inclusion bodies. The disease spread within rooms despite
 discontinuation of afl direct contact with animals, and
 droplet or aerosol transmission was suspected. Antibody to
 Ebola virus developed in animal handlers but no clinical
 disease was noted, suggesting a less virulent strain of virus.
 SHF is recognized as a fulminating fatal pathogen for monkeys
 and previous experimental Ebola infections in monkeys resulted
 in rapid death. The disease noted in this outbreak progressed
 slowly within a room and spread was measured in weeks rather
 than days. When an animal expressed clinical si
 
 
 96                               NAL Call. No.: RB125.C68 1985
 Commercial pig pen modifications for housing miniature swine
 during chronic studies.
 Semple, H.A.; Berzins, R.; Coutts, R.T.; Secord, D.C.; Tam,
 Y.K. New York : Plenum Press; 1986.
 Swine in biomedical research / edited by M.E. Tumbleson. p.
 153-157. ill; 1986.  Proceedings of a conference on Swine in
 Biomedical Research, June 17-20, 1985, Columbia, Missouri. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Pig housing; Modifications; Design
 
 
 97                                    NAL Call. No.: SF601.C64
 Common diseases and medical management of rodents and
 lagomorphs. Collins, B.R.
 New York, N.Y. : Churchill Livingstone; 1988.
 Contemporary issues in small animal practice v. 9: p. 261-316;
 1988.  In the series analytic: Exotic animals / edited by E.R.
 Jacobson and G.V. Kollias Jr.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Lagomorpha; Antibiotics; Anesthetics;
 Neoplasms; Parasitism; Metabolic diseases; Infectious
 diseases; Treatment
 
 
 98                                      NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Comparison of feeding methods for behavioural experiments with
 rats. Davies, K.; Hynard-Naylor, V.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1986 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 37 (1): p. 45-49; 1986 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rat feeding; Animal behavior; Animal housing;
 Age; Body weight; Starvation
 
 
 99                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Comparison of gavage, water bottle, and a high-moisture diet
 bolus as dosing methods for quantitative D-xylose
 administration to B6D2F1 (Mus musculus) mice.
 Zimmer, J.P.; Lewis, S.M.; Moyer, J.L.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1993 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 27 (2): p. 164-170; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Drug delivery systems
 
 Abstract:  Gavage, water bottle, and diet incorporation are 3
 dosing methods used orally to administer test compounds to
 rodents. These 3 methods were compared in mice to determine
 which represented the most quantitative delivery system. For
 dietary incorporation, a high-moisture bolus form of NIH-31
 rodent meal was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose
 as an autoclave-stable binding agent. A high-moisture bolus
 was selected to increase the acceptability of the dosed diet
 and to promote quantitative consumption through reduced
 wastage. The test compound used was D-xylose, a pentose sugar
 that may be quantitatively detected, colorimetrically, in
 urine following oral dosing. Six male and 6 female B6D2F1 mice
 were placed in metabolism cages and dosed with a known
 quantity of D-xylose by each of the 3 methods. Urine was
 collected before and after each method of administration and
 analysed for total D-xylose; the per cent recovery was based
 upon the amount of D-xylose consumed. Quantitative consumption
 was apparently greatest for water bottle dosing with an
 average recovery of 56.0% of the original D-xylose dose. High-
 moisture bolus incorporation ranked second with 56.0% D-xylose
 recovery, and gavage was third with 41.0% D-xylose recover.
 
 
 100                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A comparison of rodent caging systems based on
 microenviromental parameters. Corning, B.F.; Lipman, N.S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (5): p.
 498-503; 1991 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Environmental temperature; Carbon
 dioxide; Relative humidity; Ammonia
 
 Abstract:  Four different mouse caging systems were evaluated
 for microenvironmental temperature, carbon dioxide, relative
 humidity (RH) and ammonia levels during a 7-day testing
 period. All caging systems evaluated had polycarbonate bases
 and consisted of either a molded polyester (MP) filter lid,
 one of two different polycarbonate filter lids, or no filter
 lid which served as a control. At 50% macroenvironmental RH
 (study I), all systems maintained an intracage temperature of
 75.5 degrees F +/- 0.5 degrees. Both polycarbonate systems
 averaged > 2200 ppm of carbon dioxide more than the MP system
 and the controls. When compared with RH in the control cages,
 RH levels averaged over 20% and 5 to 8% RH greater in the
 polycarbonate filter lid systems and the MP system,
 respectively. There were no appreciable ammonia levels in
 either the MP or control systems. In the polycarbonate filter
 lid systems, ammonia levels were detectable on day 4 and were
 > 200 ppm by day 6. At 20% macroenvironmental RH (study II),
 there was a proportional 15 to 30% RH decrease from study I
 levels. Ammonia levels were undetectable in any system until
 day 7 and averaged only 17 ppm in one of the polycarbonate
 systems. Minimal differences were observed in studies III, IV
 and V when pine shavings were used instead of hardwood chips,
 a CD-1 stock instead of a DBA/2J strain, and different grades
 of filter inserts in the polycarbonate systems, respectively.
 
 
 101                                   NAL Call. No.: 41.8 AM3A
 Comparison of several combinations for anesthesia in rabbits.
 Hobbs, B.A.; Rolhall, T.G.; Sprenkel, T.L.; Anthony, K.L.
 Schaumburg, Ill. : American Veterinary Medical Association;
 1991 May. American journal of veterinary research v. 52 (5):
 p. 669-674; 1991 May. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Anesthesia; Drug combinations;
 Injectable anesthetics; Heart rate; Respiration rate; Body
 temperature; Reflexes; Safety
 
 Abstract:  Few safe and effective anesthesia regimens have
 been described for use in rabbits, partially because of the
 susceptibility of this species to sometimes fatal respiratory
 depression. Although inhalant anesthetics are generally safer
 than injectable anesthetics, their use may be limited by lack
 of equipment or facilities. This study was conducted to
 compare effects of several injectable anesthetics in rabbits
 on response to noxious stimuli, heart rate, respiratory rate,
 and rectal temperature. Six injectable anesthetic combinations
 were administered to rabbits:
 xylazine-ethyl-(l-methyl-propyl) malonyl-thio-urea salt
 (EMTU), ketamine-EMTU, xylazine-pentobarbital, xylazine-
 acepromazine-ketamine (XAK), ketamine-chloral hydrate, and
 ketamine-xylazine. All combinations induced a depression of
 respiratory rate. Although rectal temperature values were
 reduced to some degree in each group, the most profound
 hypothermia was induced by XAK. The combination that induced
 the longest duration of anesthesia was XAK. It was concluded
 that XAK was preferable for longer periods of anesthesia (60
 to 120 minutes), although it induces severe hypothermia. For
 short periods of anesthesia, xylazine-pentobarbital, xylazine-
 EMTU, or ketamine-xylazine were deemed adequate; however,
 xylazine-EMTU induced the best survivability and consistency.
 
 
 102                            NAL Call. No.: S494.5.D3I5 1990
 A computer-based hierarchical controlsystem for modern
 livestock buildings. Berckmans, D.; Vranken, E.; Goedseels, V.
 Gainesville, FL : Florida Cooperative Extension Service,
 University of Florida; 1990.
 Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Computers
 in Agricultural Extension Programs / Fedro S. Zazueta, editor.
 ; January 31-February 1, 1990, Grosvenor Resort Hotel, Disney
 World Village, Lake Buenavista, FL. p. 417-422. ill; 1990. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal housing; Climate; Computers
 
 
 103                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Computerisation of the animal house.
 Bancroft, L.S.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1985 Nov.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 36 (2): p. 191-198; 1985 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Laboratory animals; Animal
 housing; Microcomputers; Operational control; File management
 
 
 104                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Computerized ordering of experimental animals and test
 authorization. Maerki, U.; Walther, A.; Rossbach, W.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1990 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 24 (1): p. 25-31; 1990 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Switzerland; Laboratory animals; Authority;
 Acquisition; Computer techniques; Computer software; Animal
 experiments
 
 Abstract:  The authorization procedure required by law in
 Switzerland and the internal set-up at Roche for acquiring
 experimental animals has made a computerized system for
 monitoring authorizations and animal deliveries essential. The
 INQUIRE software program, which can be run on the central
 computer, was used to set-up databases with information on all
 personnel who place orders and perform experiments (PERI),
 authorization matters (BEWI), orders (ORDR), deliveries
 (SPED), animal species (SPEC), animal strains (STRE),
 populations (POPU) and the management of various data (BARA).
 The authorizations database (BEWI) permits sequential searches
 on specific questions. The animals ordered in the ORDR
 database are constantly updated in BEWI, thus ensuring that
 the authorized animal quotas are not exceeded. Expiry of an
 authorization or an unregistered experimenter will come to
 light in the course of the plausibility study. Through ORDR
 the experimenter has a good overview of the animals that he
 has ordered or have been ordered for him, and he can select
 the most appropriate strain or population for his studies in
 STRE or POPU, which contain data on the genetic and
 physiological characteristics as well as the breeding and
 keeping of all sublines and stocks. Realization of the IFIS
 project has made it a simple matter to keep a check on the
 legal requirements pertaining to animal experimentation and to
 update the information and evaluate the entire stock of data
 at any time.
 
 
 105                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Computers in the animal facility.
 Lofgreen, P.E. Jr
 New York : Media Horizons; 1987 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 16 (6): p. 59-63; 1987 Sep.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Computer
 applications; Computer software
 
 
 106                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Conditioning and breeding facilities for the cynomolgus monkey
 (Macaca fascicularis) in the Philippines: a progress report on
 the SICONBREC project. Hobbs, K.R.; Welshman, M.D.; Nazareno,
 J.B.; Resuello, R.G. Essex : Laboratory Animal Science
 Association; 1987 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (2): p. 131-137; 1987 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Philippines; Animal husbandry; Macaca; Animal
 breeding; Projects; Facilities
 
 
 107                                   NAL Call. No.: HV4761.A5
 Conference report on the improved standards for Laboratory
 Animals Act. Washington, D.C. : The Institute; 1985-1986.
 The Animal Welfare Institute quarterly v. 4, i.e. 34 (2): p.
 8-9; 1985-1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Standards;
 Improvement; Legislation; Facilities; Animal welfare
 
 
 108                                NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9C865
 Conflict, affiliation, mating, and the effects of spatial
 confinement in a captive group of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri
 sciureus).
 Perloe, S.I.
 New York : Van Nostrand Reinhold; 1986.
 Current perspectives in primate social dynamics / edited by
 David M. Taub and Frederick A. King. p. 89-98; 1986.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Squirrel monkeys; Saimiri; Social interaction;
 Mating; Cage size
 
 
 109                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Control of laboratory acquired hemorrhagic fever with renal
 syndrome (HFRS) in Japan.
 Kawamata, J.; Yamanouchi, T.; Dohmae, K.; Miyamoto, H.;
 Takahaski, M.; Yamanishi, K.; Kurata, T.; Lee, H.W.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (4): p.
 431-436; 1987 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan; Laboratory animals; Facilities; Viral
 diseases; Antibody titer; Disease control; Zoonoses
 
 
 110                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Convulsions in senescence-accelerated mice (SAM-R/1/Eis).
 Yamazaki, K.; Kumazawa, A.; Ito, K.; Kurihara, K.; Nakayama,
 M.; Wakabayashi, T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (4): p.
 378-381; 1992 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal models; Convulsions; Aging
 
 Abstract:  Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) are one of the
 animal models used for studying senescence, which consist of
 several substrains such as SAM-R/1, R/2, P/1, P/2. SAM-R/1/Eis
 maintained in Eisai Tsukuba Research Laboratories, Ibaraki,
 Japan, was originally introduced as a substrain of a normal
 control SAM-R/1 from Kyoto University, Japan. We have noted
 signs of convulsions in SAM-R/1/Eis mice during routine animal
 care, particularly while changing cages. We identified the
 clinical signs and determined the concentrations of glucose
 and immunoreactive insulin in plasma of SAM-R/1/Eis mice.
 There were no differences in the male:female ratios of mice
 showing prodrome only, grand mal, or no-signs. The ages at
 which prodrome and grand mal were first noted peaked between
 20 and 25 weeks. Concentrations of glucose and immunoreactive
 insulin in plasma did not indicate the mice were in insulin
 hypoglycemia, which is one cause of convulsions. AKR strain
 mice, some of which originated with the SAM strain are known
 to become convulsive by repeated "throwing" stimulations.
 Conversely, in SAM-R/1/Eis, throwing stimuli are not needed to
 cause convulsive signs. Thus it is likely that in SAM-R/1/Eis
 mice the signs are triggered by repeating mild environmental
 changes, such as changing cages. The results of this study
 show that SAM-R/1/Eis is neither a normal control strain, nor
 an original SAM-R/1 strain. But it is possible that SAM-
 R/1/Eis is another useful animal model for studying
 spontaneous convulsion.
 
 
 111                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Corneal dystrophy in Fisher 344 rats.
 Losco, P.E.; Troup, C.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (6): p.
 702-710. ill; 1988 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Strains; Cornea; Eye diseases;
 Histopathology
 
 Abstract:  A spontaneous degenerative lesion of the cornea
 resembling calcific band keratopathy in man has been observed
 in 10-15% of the F-344 rats (aged 35-300 days) purchased from
 a private vendor's closed breeding colony. The lesion appears
 clinically as punctate to linear superficial corneal opacities
 located in the interpalpebral fissure of one or both eyes.
 Occasional roughening, bleb formation, or pitting of the
 corneal surface resembling superficial ulcers may be observed.
 The lesion occurs in both sexes. It is rarely associated with
 inflammation or irritation. Histologically, it consists of
 mineral deposits along the epithelial basement membrane and
 Bowman's space, some of which are large enough to disrupt or
 destroy portions of the basilar epithelium. Energy dispersive
 X-ray analysis of the deposits proved them to be composed of
 calcium and phosphorus. Electron microscopic examination
 revealed a variety of extracellular laminated and crystalline
 arrays similar to those seen in humans with band keratopathy.
 The etiology of the lesion is as yet undetermined. A genetic-
 associated susceptibility due to hypercalcemia may be
 involved.
 
 
 112                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Cost effective practical gnotobiotics at the cage level.
 Sedlacek, R.S.; Suit, H.D.; Rose, E.F.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 261-266. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Gnotobiotic animals; Microbial flora
 
 
 113                                     NAL Call. No.: 410 B77
 Courtship ultrasonic vocalizations and social status in mice.
 D'Amato, F.R.
 London : Academic Press; 1991 May.
 Animal behaviour v. 41 (pt.5): p. 875-885; 1991 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Vocalization; Mating behavior; Social
 status; Reproductive performance; Inhibition; Urine;
 Biological competition
 
 Abstract:  A series of experiments was conducted to
 investigate whether the poorer sexual performance of
 subordinate than dominant male mice, Mus domesticus, was
 linked to lower sexual motivation. Ultrasonic calls uttered by
 a male in the presence of a female were used as an index of
 sexual interest. Males were housed in pairs for 5 days and
 dominant/subordinate roles were assigned. Subordinates, when
 tested in their home cage immediately after the removal of the
 dominant male, uttered more ultrasounds than the latter. When
 the dominant males was tested before the subordinate, there
 was no difference in the number of ultrasounds uttered and the
 subordinates' performance was consistently poorer. The fewer
 calls recored when subordinate males were tested after the
 dominant partner was not associated with less defence/escape
 behaviour, nor could it be explained as habituation to female
 odour, as a consequence of being tested after the dominant
 partner. Within sexually experienced pairs, the urine of
 dominant males in interacting with a female for 3 min reduced
 the number of ultrasounds uttered by the subordinate in the
 presence of a female. It is suggested that an inhibitory
 factor in the dominant male's urine functions as an indirect
 competitive mechanism when direct competition is prevented by
 removing the dominant subject.
 
 
 114                                  NAL Call. No.: 41.8 R3224
 CRITTER: A database for managing research animals.
 Lees, V.W.; Lukey, C.; Orr, R.
 Ottawa : Canadian Veterinary Medical Association; 1993 Jan.
 The Canadian veterinary journal v. 34 (1): p. 28-32; 1993 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Management; Computer software
 
 
 115                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A cross sectional survey for B virus antibody in a colony of
 group housed rhesus macaques.
 Weigler, B.J.; Roberts, J.A.; Hird, D.W.; Lerche, N.W.;
 Hilliard, J.K. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1990 May. Laboratory animal science
 v. 40 (3): p. 257-261; 1990 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Macaca mulatta; Herpesviridae; Age
 differences; Disease prevalence; Serological surveys; Sex
 differences; Social dominance
 
 Abstract:  A systematic sampling technique was used in
 combination with a highly sensitive and specific ELISA to
 provide unbiased age-specific prevalence estimates of B virus
 antibody in rhesus monkeys housed in three different outdoor
 breeding corrals. Among 146 sampled monkeys, 97% of animals
 2.5 years and older were seropositive, while only 22% of
 younger animals were seropositive. Neither gender nor social
 dominance ranking were predictive of B virus antibody status.
 The strong age association was not inconsistent with
 hypothesized veneral transmission of B virus. Improvements in
 the epidemiologic understanding of B virus are necessary to
 assist efforts to eradicate this agent from breeding colonies
 of rhesus monkeys.
 
 
 116                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Cryptosporidiosis in ferrets.
 Rehg, J.E.; Gigliotti, F.; Stokes, D.C.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (2): p.
 155-158. ill; 1988 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ferrets; Facilities; Cryptosporidium; Protozoal
 infections; Histopathology
 
 Abstract:  The diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis in two ferrets
 who died from unrelated causes prompted a survey to determine
 the prevalence and incidence of the infection in ferrets at
 our facility. The survey of the existing ferret population and
 all new arrivals indicated cryptosporidiosis occurred as a
 subclinical disease a high percentage of young ferrets: 40% of
 the ferret population and 38 to 100% of the new arrivals had
 cryptosporidial oocysts in their feces. The infection was
 found to persist for several weeks in both immunocompetent and
 immunosuppressed ferrets. The interspecies transmission of
 Cryptosporidium implies that infected ferrets should be
 considered a potential source of infection for the general
 population.
 
 
 117                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Cubicles--a rational approach to specialised laboratory animal
 housing. Kuntz, M.J.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (3): p. 203-211; 1989 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing
 
 
 118                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Cysticercus fasciolaris infection in a breeding colony of
 mice. Davis, J.A.; Donkaewbua, S.; Wagner, J.E.; White, R.G.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (3): p.
 250-252. ill; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cysticercus; Infection; Cysts; Disease
 transmission; Disease control
 
 
 119                                  NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 Cytotoxic and enzyme-inducing effects of rodent diets and cage
 bedding materials: evaluation by a cell culture study.
 Torronen, R.; Pelkonen, K.; Karenlampi, S.
 Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical
 Experiments; 1990 Mar.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 17 (3): p.
 182-187; 1990 Mar. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Feeds; Animal housing;
 Cytotoxicity; Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase; Cell culture
 
 
 120                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Decontamination of rat embryos and transfer to specific
 pathogen-free recipients for the production of a breeding
 colony.
 Rouleau, A.M.J.; Kovacs, P.R.; Kunz, H.W.; Armstrong, D.T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (6): p.
 611-615; 1993 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Germfree state; Germfree animals;
 Decontamination; Embryos; Superovulation; Embryo transfer;
 Trypsin
 
 Abstract:  When animals are introduced to a specific pathogen-
 free (SPF) facility, care must be taken to avoid the
 possibility of disease transmission to the local colony. This
 study investigated the application of a combination of
 reproductive biotechnologies to establish a new disease-free
 colony of two rat strains, DarkAgouti(Da/Pit) and Wistar
 Furth(WF/Pit), from a stock known to be chronically infected
 with the following pathogens: Mycoplasma pulmonis, Kilham's
 rat virus, sialodacryoadenitis/coronavirus, and reovirus type
 3. To eliminate the pathogens and optimize the use of animals,
 superovulation, embryo washing and trypsinization, and embryo
 transfer were used. Donors (DA/Pit and WF/Pit) were treated as
 follows: the mature females were synchronized by subcutaneous
 (s.c.) injection with 40 micrograms luteinizing hormone-
 releasing hormone agonist/animal on day 4. All immature and
 mature females were induced to superovulate by continuous s.c.
 infusion with a commercial porcine follicle-stimulating
 hormone (FSH) preparation (3.4 or 6.8 mg NIH-FSH-P1 units per
 day, respectively), beginning on the morning of day-2. On the
 afternoon of day 0, the animals received 30 IU human chorionic
 gonadotropin injected intraperitoneally and mated. From a
 total of 213 ova flushed from the oviducts of 16 programmed
 donors, 195 transferrable two-cell embryos were recovered. Two
 outbred strains of SPF rats, Long-Evans (LE) and Wistar (W),
 were used as recipients. These mature females (LE and W) were
 synchronized by using luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone
 agonist as described and made pseudopregnant by cervical
 stimulation. Two-cell embryos (DA/Pit and WF/Pit) were washed
 and trypsinized, then transferred to the oviducts of the
 pseudopregnant recipients (LE and W). From a total of 195
 embryos transferred, 57 pups were born (29.2% of embryos
 transferred.) All offspring tested negative for the viruses
 infecting the donors as long as they were kept under strict
 quarantine. The combination of those three techniques provides
 an efficient alternative to the traditional derivation by
 caesarean section.
 
 
 121                                NAL Call. No.: QP82.2.S8A55
 Definition of laboratory animal environmental conditions.
 Besch, E.L.
 Bethesda, Md. : American Physiological Society; 1985.
 Animal stress / editor, Gary P. Moberg. p. 297-315; 1985. 
 Paper presented at a symposium, July 1983, sponsored by the
 College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at the
 University of California, Davis.  Includes 114 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare; Environmental
 factors; Housing temperature and humidity; Ventilation;
 Lighting; Adaptation
 
 
 122                                    NAL Call. No.: QL750.A6
 Description and validation of a preference test system to
 evaluate housing conditions for laboratory mice.
 Blom, H.J.M.; Vorstenbosch, C.J.A.H.V. van; Baumans, V.;
 Hoogervorst, M.J.C.; Beynen, A.C.; Zutphen, L.F.M. van
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Oct.
 Applied animal behaviour science v. 35 (1): p. 67-82; 1992
 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal housing
 
 
 123                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Design considerations for research animal facilities.
 Cooper, E.C.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 18 (6): p. 23-26. ill; 1989 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing
 
 
 124                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 Design of rooms for housing laboratory animals.
 Witz, R.L.; Sauvageau, G.; Johnson, T.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-4532):
 9 p.; 1989. Paper presented at the 1989 International Winter
 Meeting, December 12-15, 1989, New Orleans, Louisiana. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal housing; Laboratories; Design;
 Environmental control
 
 
 125                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Developing effective social and environment enrichment
 strategies for macaques in captive groups.
 O'Neill, P.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1988 May.
 Lab animal v. 17 (4): p. 23-24, 27-28, 31-34, 36. ill; 1988
 May.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca; Environment; Social emotional
 development; Animal housing; Facilities; Rearing techniques;
 Group behavior; Activity
 
 
 126                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Developing housing facilities for rhesus monkeys: prevention
 of abnormal behaviour.
 Goosen, C.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 67-70; 1988.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Animal housing; Cages;
 Facilities; Animal behavior; Abnormal behavior; Behavior
 change
 
 
 127                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Development of a semi-inbred line of Landrace pigs. I.
 Breeding performance and immunogenetic characteristics.
 Hradecky, J.; Hruban, V.; Hojny, J.; Pazdera, J.; Stanek, R.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1985 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 19 (4): p. 279-283; 1985 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Landrace; Inbred lines; Immunogenetics;
 Breeding efficiency
 
 
 128                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1I43
 Development of fatty and corpulent rat strains.
 Greenhouse, D.D.; Hansen, C.T.; Michaelis, O.E.
 Washington, D.C. : Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources,
 National Research Council; 1990.
 I.L.A.R. news v. 32 (3): p. 2-4; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mutations; Animal breeding; Nomenclature
 
 
 129                                    NAL Call. No.: 410 IN84
 The development of laboratory animal management and the state
 of the art in Kenya.
 Suleman, M.A.
 Oslo, Norway : The International Council for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990. ICLAS bulletin (66): p. 26-28; 1990.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kenya; Laboratory animals; Animal husbandry
 
 
 130                                  NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 Development of potential alternatives to the draize eye test:
 the CTFA evaluation of alternatives program.
 Gettings, S.D.; McEwen, G.N. Jr
 Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical
 Experiments; 1990 Jun.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 17 (4): p.
 317-324; 1990 Jun. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal testing alternatives; Evaluation;
 Organizations
 
 Abstract:  The CTFA Evaluation of Alternatives Program is a
 multi-year effort organised by a scientific advisory committee
 (the CTFA Animal Welfare Task Force), and is designed to
 evaluate (in Phase I) approximately twenty-five potential
 alternative methods to the Draize eye irritancy test.
 Coordination, management of logistics, collection and
 statistical analysis of data, are being conducted by the
 Columbus Division of the Battelle Memorial Institute. The US
 Food and Drug Administration has been aware of the Program
 since its inception. The intention of the Program is to
 provide industry with information on the performance of a
 series of potential alternatives to the Draize test, so as to
 aid individual companies to identify those methods which seem
 best suited to their own particular testing needs. The
 participants are either CTFA member companies who are already
 using or developing alternative tests, or those independent
 investigators whose development work is being sponsored by
 CTFA members. The purpose of the Program is to determine the
 effectiveness and limitations of a variety of tests for a
 range of different product types. Specifically, the Program
 will evaluate the capacity of the tests under investigation to
 rank and discriminate between the ocular irritation potential
 of a range of prototype cosmetic and personal care products.
 The Program is designed as a multi-year effort with a
 different product type evaluated each year. In Phase I, ten
 different ethanol-based substances are being tested; oil/water
 emulsions will be evaluated in Phase II.
 
 
 131                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The development of rabbit, guinea pig and mouse cages.
 Eveleigh, J.R.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1988 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 39 (2): p. 107-116. ill; 1988 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Rabbits; Mice; Cages; Design; Types;
 Floors
 
 
 132                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Diagnosis of subclinical Bacillus piliformis infection in a
 barrier-maintained mouse production colony.
 Gibson, S.V.; Waggie, K.S.; Wagner, J.E.; Ganaway, J.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (6): p.
 786-788. ill; 1987 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Bacillus piliformis; Histopathology;
 Facilities; Treatment; Gerbils
 
 
 133                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Diagnostic exercise: subcutaneous nodules in rhesus monkeys.
 Spencer, A.J.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (1): p.
 79-80. ill; 1985 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Toxicity; Diagnosis; Facilities
 
 
 134                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Diet and breeding performance in cats.
 Olovson, S.G.
 London : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1986 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 20 (3): p. 221-230. ill; 1986 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cat; Animal breeding; Diets; Animal nutrition;
 Reproductive performance
 
 
 135                                  NAL Call. No.: QL785.A725
 Diet sampling by wild Norway rats offered several unfamiliar
 foods. Beck, M.; Hitchcock, C.L.; Galef, B.G. Jr
 Austin, Tex. : Psychonomic Society; 1988 May.
 Animal learning &amp; behavior v. 16 (2): p. 224-230; 1988 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rattus; Rats; Diets; Sampling; Feeding; Behavior;
 Food preferences
 
 Abstract:  The present experiment was undertaken to examine
 directly the diet sampling behavior of wild Norway rats
 (Rattus norvegicus) faced with a choice among familiar and
 unfamiliar foods. First-generation, laboratory-reared wild
 Norway rats ate from four food cups. Three of the food cups
 were in unfamiliar locations and contained unfamiliar foods.
 The remaining food cup was in a familiar location and
 contained a familiar food. Subjects in a control group were
 offered the familiar food in all four locations. We found (1)
 that subjects in experimental and control conditions took
 equal amounts of time to first visit food cups in unfamiliar
 locations, (2) that subjects in the experimental condition
 (those with access to unfamiliar foods) ate at unfamiliar
 locations at a slower rate than did subjects in the control
 condition (those with access only to familiar food), (3) that
 subjects in the experimental condition were no more likely
 than subjects in the control condition to eat at one
 unfamiliar location at a time, and (4) that following a bout
 of eating at an unfamiliar food cup, subjects in the
 experimental condition wated no longer than subjects in the
 control condition before eating from a different unfamiliar
 food cup. We interpreted these data as indicating that
 although wild Norway rats are hesitant to eat unfamiliar
 foods, once they begin to eat such foods, they do not sample
 among them so as to facilitate identification of any toxin
 present.
 
 
 136                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Differences in behaviour among adult male, female pairs of
 cotton-top tamarins (Saguinu oedipus) in different conditions
 of housing.
 Box, H.O.; Rohrhuber, B.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 44 (1): p. 19-30; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Callithricidae; Animal behavior; Animal housing
 
 
 137                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Disarming canine teeth of nonhuman primates using the
 submucosal vital root retention technique.
 Schofield, J.C.; Alves, M.E.A.F.; Hughes, K.W.; Bennett, B.T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (2): p.
 128-133; 1991 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Teeth; Amputation; Postoperative
 complications
 
 Abstract:  Removing or reducing the size of canine teeth of
 baboons and macaques has become an accepted practice to
 minimize the potential for injury to laboratory animal care
 personnel. A submucosal vital root retention procedure was
 adapted from the technique of root banking human teeth. In
 this technique, the crown of a tooth is amputated below the
 level of the alveolar bone crest, and the exposed pulp covered
 by a mucoperiosteal gingival flap. Our aim was to disarm the
 canine teeth of baboons and macaques with a single surgical
 procedure that would preserve a vital tooth root buried in
 alveolar bone under normal mucosa. Our long-term objective was
 to develop a technique that would not require further clinical
 management during the life of the animal. This paper presents
 the surgical techniques used.
 
 
 138                                     NAL Call. No.: 410 B77
 Djungarian hamster females conceive in the presence of
 multiple sibling males. Ferguson, B.; Dewsbury, D.A.
 London : Bailliere Tindall; 1987 Apr.
 Animal behaviour v. 35 (pt.2): p. 597-599; 1987 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hamsters; Copulation; Animal breeding;
 Reproductive behavior
 
 
 139                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 DNA fingerprinting for genetic monitoring of inbred laboratory
 rats and mice. Russell, R.J.; Festing, M.F.W.; Deeny, A.A.;
 Peters, A.G. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1993 Oct. Laboratory animal science
 v. 43 (5): p. 460-465; 1993 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mice; Dna fingerprinting
 
 Abstract:  DNA fingerprinting using a nonisotopically labeled
 minisatellite probe provided a valuable technique for genetic
 monitoring/quality control of laboratory rodents. Each of 12
 inbred rat strains had a unique fingerprint pattern, and
 colonies separated for over 20 years had identical or nearly
 identical patterns. Strain LOU/Iap, which is known to have
 been genetically contaminated in the past, was clearly
 different from strain LOU/CN, supporting previous findings of
 studies using biochemical markers. Inbred strains of mice were
 also found to differ from each other. The F1 hybrid between
 C57BL/6 and CBA/Ca could not be distinguished from C57BL/6 by
 using DNA fingerprints, although they could be distinguished
 by using biochemical markers. Some congenic strains differed
 from their inbred partner. A suspected genetic contamination
 of MRL/Mp-lpr mice could not be detected in a sample of the
 breeding colony by using biochemical markers; however, DNA
 fingerprints from the suspect animals clearly demonstrated
 genetic segregation. DNA fingerprinting will be of particular
 value in investigating suspected problems as only a small
 sample of fresh, frozen, or ethanol-preserved tissue is
 needed. Thus, the actual suspect animals can be studied,
 rather than samples from a breeding colony from which
 contaminated animals may already have been eliminated.
 
 
 140                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Duration of protection from reinfection following exposure to
 sialodacryoadenitis virus in wistar rats.
 Percy, D.H.; Bond, S.J.; Paturzo, F.X.; Bhatt, P.N.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Mar. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (2): p.
 144-149. ill; 1990 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Sialodacryoadenitis virus; Viral diseases;
 Disease resistance; Immunity; Reinfection; Disease
 transmission
 
 Abstract:  Wistar rats [CR1:(WI)BR] were inoculated
 intranasally with approximately 10(3) median mouse lethal
 infective doses of sialodacryoadenitis (SDA) virus. Animals
 were subsequently selected at random, removed to a separate
 isolation room, and reinfected with SDA virus at 3, 6, 9, 12
 or 15 months. Pre- and postinoculation serum samples were
 collected from all animals during the course of the study and
 evaluated for antibody titers to SDA virus. All experimental,
 control and sentinel animals, following inoculation with SDA
 virus, were necropsied and examined for lesions consistent
 with SDA. Salivary gland lesions were minimal to absent in
 rats reinfected with SDA virus for up to 12 to 15 months after
 the initial exposure and minimal to moderate in the
 respiratory tract at 12 or 15 months. SDA-associated lesions
 were extensive in age matched control animals examined at each
 time period of reinfection with SDA virus. Thus, prior
 exposure to SDA virus did protect against the development of
 typical salivary gland lesions for up to 15 months. Recovered
 animals were evaluated for their ability to transmit the virus
 following reinfection. Rats reinfected at 6 or 9 months were
 infectious to their naive cage mates. The results indicate
 that reinfection with homologous rat coronavirus can occur as
 early as 6 months after the initial infection, and such rats
 can transmit the infection to contact controls.
 
 
 141                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Effect of acclimation to caging on nephrotoxic response of
 rats to uranium. Damon, E.G.; Eidson, A.F.; Hobbs, C.H.; Hahn,
 F.F.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1986 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 36 (1): p.
 24-36. ill; 1986 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Acclimatization; Metabolism cage; Toxicity;
 Responses; Uranium; Kidneys
 
 
 142                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Effect of cage population density on plasma corticosterone and
 peripheral lymphocyte populations of laboratory mice.
 Peng, X.; Lang, C.M.; Drozdowicz, C.K.; Ohlsson-Wilhelm, B.M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (4): p. 302-306; 1989 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cage density; Corticosterone; Blood plasma;
 Lymphocytes; Stress
 
 Abstract:  The effect of different population densities of
 mice per cage on plasma corticosterone, peripheral lymphocytes
 and specific lymphocyte subpopulations was investigated. The
 animals were housed in groups of 2, 4 or 8 mice per cage and
 the blood samples were taken from each animal of these groups
 on days one, 7 and 14. A significant elevation (P < 0.05) in
 plasma corticosterone concentration was observed in the group
 of 8 mice per cage on days one and 7 as compared with those of
 2 or 4 mice per cage. The number of peripheral lymphocytes was
 significantly decreased in the groups of 2 (P < 0.01) and 8 (P
 < 0.05) mice per cage as compared with the group of 4 mice per
 cage on day one. A significantly decreased number of
 lymphocytes (P < 0.01) in the group of 8 mice per cage
 continued to day 7. There were no significant differences in
 specific lymphocyte subpopulations observed among these
 groups. The results of this study suggest that a population
 density of 4 mice per cage induced minimal stress compared to
 that induced by the population densities of 2 or 8 mice per
 cage. Since stress is known to induce alteration in a variety
 of biological functions, the population density of mice per
 cage should be considered in the interpretation of research
 data.
 
 
 143                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 The effect of cage size on the behavior of individually housed
 rhesus monkeys. Bayne, K.A.L.; McCully, C.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Oct.
 Lab animal v. 18 (7): p. 25-28; 1989 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Cage size; Animal behavior
 
 
 144                                    NAL Call. No.: 470 C16D
 The effect of captivity on reproduction and development in
 Peromyscus maniculatus.
 Millar, J.S.; Threadgill, D.A.L.
 Ottawa, Canada : National Research Council of Canada; 1987
 Jul. Canadian journal of zoology v. 65 (7): p. 1713-1719; 1987
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Peromyscus; Breeding methods; Population
 pressure; Natural mating; Laboratory rearing; Litter size;
 Reproductive performance
 
 
 145                                   NAL Call. No.: 41.8 AM3A
 Effect of in-house transport on murine plasma corticosterone
 concentration and blood lymphocyte populations.
 Drozdowicz, C.K.; Bowman, T.A.; Webb, M.L.; Lang, C.M.
 Schaumburg, Ill. : American Veterinary Medical Association;
 1990 Nov. American journal of veterinary research v. 51 (11):
 p. 1841-1846; 1990 Nov. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Transport of animals; Stress; Lymphocytes;
 Corticosterone; Blood plasma; Leukocyte count; Thymus gland;
 Immunosuppression
 
 Abstract:  The effect of in-house transport on plasma
 corticosterone concentration and blood lymphocyte populations
 of laboratory mice was investigated. Mice were transported
 within a research facility at 0900 hours in a pattern designed
 to simulate that commonly used by investigators prior to
 experimental manipulation. Plasma corticosterone concentration
 and WBC count were determined at 0.25, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24
 hours after transport. A significant (P less than 0.05)
 increase in plasma corticosterone concentration was seen in
 mice immediately after transport. The normal circadian rhythm
 of plasma corticosterone concentration was altered for the
 subsequent 24-hour period. Corresponding significant (P less
 than 0.05) decreases in total WBC numbers, lymphocyte count,
 and thymus gland weight were observed. The decrease in total
 blood lymphocyte numbers at 4 hours was reflected in B-and T-
 lymphocyte populations. The subsequent acute increase in
 plasma corticosterone concentration was associated with
 alterations in the cellular components of the immune system.
 Results of the study indicated that routine in-house transport
 of laboratory mice should be considered a stressful stimulus.
 
 
 146                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Effect of temporary restricted social housing on later
 reproductive behavior in adolescent chimpanzees.
 Fritz, J.; Howell, S.M.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 May.
 Lab animal v. 21 (5): p. 21-25; 1992 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzees; Animal housing; Sexual behavior
 
 
 147                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The effect of transportation stress on splenic natural killer
 cell activity in C57BL/6J mice.
 Aguila, H.N.; Pakes, S.P.; Lai, W.C.; Lu, Y.S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (2): p.
 148-151; 1988 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Transport of animals; Air transport;
 Trucks; Stress; Spleen; Cell physiology; Corticosterone
 
 Abstract:  Splenic natural killer cell activity and plasma
 corticosterone levels were measured in air- and truck-
 transported C57BL/6J mice (Mus musculus) on days 0, 1, 3 and 5
 post-arrival. These data are important in determining adequate
 stabilization periods for transported animals before studies
 involving natural killer cells are begun. Three control groups
 (phosphate buffered saline, polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid,
 and hydrocortisone injected mice) were stabilized in the
 animal facilities 3 weeks before the start of experiments.
 Natural killer activity in transported mice was reduced
 significantly (p less than 0.05) on day 0 and returned to
 normal levels by 24 hours. Plasma corticosterone levels were
 increased significantly (p less than 0.005) on day 0 and
 returned to control levels by day 1, correlating inversely
 with splenic natural killer activity. This study indicates
 that stress resulting from transportation causes a short-term
 decrease in the splenic natural killer cell activity of mice,
 and this decrease may be related to the increased plasma
 corticosterone levels induced by the stressful event. We
 conclude that mice should be stabilized at least 24 hours
 before experiments involving the natural killer cell system
 are begun.
 
 
 148                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The effectiveness of a microisolator cage system and sentinel
 mice for controlling and defecting MHV and Sendai virus
 infections. Dillehay, D.L.; Lehner, N.D.M.; Huerkamp, M.J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jul. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (4): p.
 367-370; 1990 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Murine paramyxovirus; Viral hepatitis;
 Cages; Isolation; Sentinel animals; Litter; Disease
 prevention; Detection
 
 Abstract:  Experiments were conducted to determine (a) whether
 BALB/c mice housed on soiled bedding can be used as sentinels
 for the detection of Sendai virus and MHV from infected mice
 housed in microisolators, and (b) whether the microisolator
 caging system protects mice against Sendai virus and MHV
 infections. Sentinel mice were housed in microisolator cages,
 exposed continuously to soiled bedding and bled at 21 and 42
 days for serology. All sentinel mice were seropositive for MHV
 by 42 days; however, sentinel mice exposed to soiled bedding
 were seronegative for Sendai virus at 21 and 42 days. These
 results suggest that sentinels housed on soiled bedding may
 not detect all infectious murine viruses. This study also
 showed that the microisolator caging system provided an
 effective barrier against MHV infection at the cage level and
 suggests that the microisolators should protect mice against
 other infectious agents.
 
 
 149                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The effects of a mass air displacement unit on the
 microenvironmental parameters within isolator cages.
 Corning, B.F.; Lipman, N.S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (1): p.
 91-93; 1992 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Air quality; Air flow;
 Microenvironments; Gases
 
 
 150                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Effects of ambient lighting on the eyes of rats.
 Kupp, R.P. Jr; Pinto, C.A.; Rubin, L.F.; Griffin, H.E.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Jul.
 Lab animal v. 18 (5): p. 32-35, 37. ill; 1989 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Eyes (animal); Natural light; Facilities;
 Lighting; Retinas; Degeneration
 
 
 151                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Effects of cage beddings on microsomal oxidative enzymes in
 rat liver. Weichbrod, R.H.; Cisar, C.F.; Miller, J.G.;
 Simmonds, R.C.; Alvares, A.P.; Ueng, T.H.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (3): p.
 296-298; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Liver; Enzyme activity; Microsomes;
 Benzopyrene; Hydroxylases; Cages; Litter; Wood shavings; Wood
 chips; Pines; Cedrus; Maize cobs
 
 Abstract:  The purpose of the present studies was to evaluate
 the effects of some commercially available cage beddings on
 rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450-dependent drug-
 metabolizing enzyme, ethylmorphine N-demethylase, and the
 carcinogen-metabolizing enzyme, benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase.
 Sprague-Dawley rats were housed in cages containing cedar
 chip, corncob or heat-treated pinewood bedding for 3 weeks.
 Control rats were housed in cages on wire bottom floors
 containing no bedding material. Rats housed in cages
 containing cedar chip showed 18, 46 and 49% increases in liver
 cytochrome P-450 content, ethylmorphine N-demethylase and
 benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase activities, respectively. The liver
 enzyme activities of rats housed incages containing corncob
 bedding were similar to those obtained with control rats. In
 contrast, the pinewood-bedded rats showed a 21% decrease in
 ethylmorphine N-demethylase activity without affecting
 cytochrome P-450 content and benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase
 activity. Hexobarbital-induced sleep times of the variously
 bedded rats were similar to those of control animals. These
 data suggest that the commercial bedding materials differ in
 their abilities to affect liver microsomal enzymes. Thus,
 interlaboratory variability in basal enzyme activities
 reported in the literature may be partly due to bedding
 materials used in the animal's cages.
 
 
 152                            NAL Call. No.: SF407.P7T49 1991
 Effects of cage size and environmental enrichment on
 behavioral and physiological responses of rhesus macaques to
 the stress of daily events., 1st ed.;.
 Line, S.W.; Markowitz, H.; Morgan, K.N.; Strong, S.
 Washington, DC : American Psychological Association ;; 1991.
 Through the looking glass: issues of psychological well-being
 in captive nonhuman primates / edited by Melinda A. Novak and
 Andrew J. Petto. p. 160-179; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Environment; Enrichment; Cage
 size; Stress; Animal welfare; Animal husbandry
 
 
 153                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The effects of cage size and pair housing on exercise of
 beagle dogs. Hughes, H.C.; Campbell, S.; Kenney, C.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 Jul. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (4): p.
 302-305; 1989 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Dogs; Animal housing; Cage size; Cage
 density; Exercise; Animal welfare; Regulations
 
 Abstract:  One of the requirements of the 1985 amendments to
 the Animal Welfare Act is the establishment of an exercise
 program for dogs. Assumptions have been made by some that
 larger cages or the presence of a companion animal will
 motivate exercise. To examine how cage size, pair housing and
 human contact affect exercise, a study was conducted using a
 computerized video-data acquisition system that measured
 distance traveled and time spent moving in 1 X 1 m, (single
 only) and 1 X 2 m (single and paired) and 1 X 1.5 m cage
 (paired only) cages. Male beagle dogs (n = 6) housed singly in
 the 1 m2 cage traveled an average of 55m/hr spending only 8%
 (57 min) of the 12 h photo period in motion. When the cage
 size was doubled, the average distance traveled decreased to
 13m/hr and the time spent moving increased to 11% (77
 min/day). When dogs were pair housed in a regulation size
 cage, the average distance traveled decreased to 8.6 m/hr and
 they spent less than 6% of the day in exercising (42
 min/12hrs.). The greatest amount of exercise was seen when
 dogs were housed as a pair in a cage less than recommended
 size (an average of 109 m/hr and 8.8 min/hr). Therefore, these
 data indicate that larger cages or pair housing in regulation
 size cages have little or no effect on the activity of purpose
 bred male beagle dogs. There was, however, a direct
 correlation between activity, time and distance, and the
 presence of humans in the animal room. When people were in the
 room, dog activity increased. When people were absent, dogs
 were less active.
 
 
 154                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Effects of dichlorvos treatment on mouse reproduction.
 Casebolt, D.B.; Leary, S.L.; Undeutsch, L.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (1): p.
 65-67; 1990 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Dichlorvos; Vapor; Reproductive efficiency;
 Cholinesterase; Litter size; Gestation period
 
 Abstract:  To test whether exposure to dichlorvos vapors for
 treatment of mouse ectoparasites resulted in temporary
 cessation of breeding, we exposed harem breeding groups of
 mice to varying concentrations of dichlorvos vapors and
 examined the effects of exposure on litter frequency and
 litter size. All exposure levels resulted in decreased plasma
 cholinesterase concentrations in treated mice for up to 10
 days following the completion of exposure. Litter frequency
 and size were unaffected by dichlorvos exposure, and gestation
 times were not prolonged. Therefore, treatment with dichlorvos
 vapors during breeding did not affect reproduction in exposed
 mice.
 
 
 155                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 The effects of group housing on the research use of the
 laboratory rabbit. Whary, M.; Peper, R.; Borkowski, G.;
 Lawrence, W.; Ferguson, F. London : Royal Society of Medicine
 Services; 1993 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 27 (4): p. 330-341; 1993 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbit housing; Groups
 
 Abstract:  This project evaluated the influence of group
 housing on common aspects of research use of female laboratory
 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Eight rabbits housed
 individually in conventional cages were compared to a second
 group of 8 housed as a social group in a proportionately
 larger enclosure. The group housing method provided increased
 opportunities for exercise, social contact, and a more novel
 environment. As a function of housing style, the 2
 experimental groups were compared on humoral and delayed
 hypersensitivity response, feed intake, growth rate, and
 selected physiological parameters that are considered to
 reflect stress in most species. Singleand group housed rabbits
 did not significantly differ in physiological and
 immunological measurements, indicating that the practical
 research performance (immune response, stress level, growth
 rates etc.) of these rabbits was not significantly affected by
 group housing compared with the more traditional single
 housing. Analysis of group social behaviour indicated that the
 rabbits preferred small social groups, had preferences for
 microenvironments within the enclosure, and exhibited
 behaviours that are not possible when housed singly. Group
 housing appeared to be a successful method for enriching the
 environment of female rabbits and aspects of it should be
 considered in the approach to housing rabbits used in
 research.
 
 
 156                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.L342
 Effects of humidity on breeding success in laboratory mice.
 Donnelly, H.
 Potters Bar : Universities Federation for Animal Welfare;
 1989. Laboratory animal welfare research : rodents : proc of a
 symposium organized by Universities Federation for Animal
 Welfare, held at the Royal Holloway and Bedford New College,
 Univ of London, Egham, Surrey, 22nd April 1988. p. 17-24;
 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Relative humidity; Reproductive
 performance; Litter size; Survival; Growth rate; Neonatal
 mortality
 
 
 157                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 The effects of intracage ventilation on microenvironmental
 conditions in filter-top cages.
 Lipman, N.S.; Corning, B.F.; Coiro, M.A. Sr
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1992 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 26 (3): p. 206-210; 1992 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Ventilation; Microenvironments;
 Carbon dioxide; Ammonia; Relative humidity
 
 Abstract:  Filter-top cages, while effective in reducing cross
 contamination by particulate material including microbes, can
 also cause accumulation of the waste gases carbon dioxide and
 ammonia as well as increased intracage relative humidity. A
 prototype system which provided each cage with 23 air changes
 per hour through a nozzle inserted in the filter lid was
 evaluated. The ventilated cageing system was effective in
 reducing intracage carbon dioxide, ammonia and relative
 humidity levels. Mean weekly carbon dioxide levels were 2900
 ppm lower, ammonia levels 240 ppm lower and intracage relative
 humidity levels 8% lower in the ventilated cages than in
 unventilated controls.
 
 
 158                                NAL Call. No.: QL737.C22C36
 Effects of primary enclosure size and human contact.
 Hughes, H.C.; Campbell, S.
 Bethesda, MD : Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1990 Jan.
 Canine research environment / edited by Joy A. Mench and Lee
 Krulisch. p. 66-75; 1990 Jan.  Paper presented at a conference
 held by the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, June 22,
 1989, Bethesda, Md. Question and answer session p. 74-75. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Laboratory animals; Animal housing;
 Socialization; Animal welfare
 
 
 159                                    NAL Call. No.: QL750.A6
 The effects of repeated handling by familiar and unfamiliar
 people on rabbits in individual cages and group pens.
 Podberscek, A.L.; Blackshaw, J.K.; Beattie, A.W.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.; 1991 Jan.
 Applied animal behaviour science v. 28 (4): p. 365-373; 1991
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Handling; Fearfulness; Cages; Pens
 
 
 160                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The effects of single caging on chimpanzee behavior.
 Brent, L.; Lee, D.R.; Eichberg, J.W.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (4): p.
 345-346; 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzee; Cages; Animal behavior; Animal
 welfare; Environment
 
 
 161                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The effects of two novel objects on the behavior of singly
 caged adult rhesus macaques.
 Line, S.W.; Morgan, K.N.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (4): p.
 365-369; 1991 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Toys; Environment; Enrichment;
 Behavior change; Animal behavior; Abnormal behavior; Animal
 welfare
 
 Abstract:  Six female and six male adult rhesus macaques were
 given sticks and nylon balls as an attempt at simple cage
 enrichment. A latin square design was used to compare behavior
 during separate 4-week periods with each object and during a
 control period with no object. Frequency and duration of 15
 different behaviors were recorded. Resting was the most common
 activity which decreased slightly in duration when the stick
 or nylon ball was present (P < 0.02). The mean duration of
 stick use was longer than that of the nylon ball (P < 0.01).
 No other behaviors changed significantly, including the
 frequency of abnormal behaviors such as self-abuse,
 stereotypic acts, and bizarre postures. Generally, these
 objects were used infrequently and led to few changes in the
 behavior of singly-caged adult rhesus macaques. However, they
 did appear to stimulate activity for some individuals.
 
 
 162                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The efficacy and safety of chlorpyrifos (Dursban) for control
 of Myobia musculi infestation in mice.
 Pence, B.C.; Demick, D.S.; Richard, B.C.; Buddingh, F.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (2): p.
 139-142; 1991 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Myobia musculi; Mite control; Granules;
 Chlorpyrifos; Infestation; Toxicity; Controlled release
 
 Abstract:  Mite infestation in laboratory mice is a common,
 but troublesome problem in animal facilities. Recommended
 treatment regimens are frequently ineffective because of the
 short period of exposure to the control agent. In an effort to
 develop a time-release approach, we have investigated the use
 of Dursban granules applied in animal bedding. Initial
 toxicity studies indicated that this pesticide can be added to
 shoebox cage litter at levels three times that used for
 outdoor application (6 g per 27 by 48 cm shoebox cage) without
 producing clinical signs of toxicity. Metabolism studies
 demonstrated that although individual mice showed decreased
 brain acetylcholinesterase activity following treatment, liver
 cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase, liver microsomal
 aminopyrine N-demethylase, or aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase
 were not induced after 1 week of exposure. Parasitological
 studies indicated elimination of mites and itching in an
 experimental infestation, as well as reduction of itching in
 severely symptomatic, naturally infested mice, following
 treatment with the granules. These studies demonstrate the
 nontoxic efficacy of Dursban in the control of Myobia musculi.
 
 
 163                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 An efficient method for the intensive production of F1 (CBA/Ca
 X C57BL/6) hybrid mice.
 Parnham, D.W.; Smith, L.C.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Apr01.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (1): p. 43-47; 1990 Apr01.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Progeny production; Crosses; Reproductive
 performance
 
 Abstract:  In response to a request for a regular supply of 25
 four-week-old F1 (CBA/Ca X C57BL/6) female mice per week, a
 production system has been developed, involving the use of one
 standard 56-cage rack. The system has proved to be reliable,
 economic and easily managed. By careful selection of females,
 both mean litter size at birth and percentage survival to
 weaning showed a marked increase on that expected from either
 of the inbred lines.
 
 
 164                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Elimination of mouse hepatitis virus from a breeding colony by
 temporary cessation of breeding.
 Weir, E.C.; Bhatt, P.N.; Barthold, S.W.; Cameron, G.A.;
 Simack, P.A. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1987 Aug. Laboratory animal science
 v. 37 (4): p. 455-458. ill; 1987 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Viral hepatitis; Animal breeding; Disease
 control; Histopathology
 
 
 165                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Elimination of sialodacryoadenitis virus from a rat production
 colony by using seropositive breeding animals.
 Brammer, D.W.; Dysko, R.C.; Spilman, S.C.; Oskar, P.A.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (6): p.
 633-634; 1993 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Sialodacryoadenitis virus; Disease control;
 Colonies; Screening
 
 
 166                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 An employee appraisal model for supervisors and managers.
 Cummings, J.F.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 May.
 Lab animal v. 15 (4): p. 19-23; 1986 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Employment;
 Managers; Supervisors; Evaluation criteria; Models
 
 
 167                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 An employee training program in research animal care and use.
 Hammer, J.G.; Miller, B.; Ali, F.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1987 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 16 (6): p. 53-55, 57; 1987 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Animal husbandry;
 Facilities; Employment; Training; Education; Animal research;
 Programs
 
 
 168                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Enclosure design and reproductive success of baboons used for
 reproductive research in Kenya.
 Else, J.G.; Tarara, R.; Suleman, M.A.; Eley, R.M.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1986 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 36 (2): p.
 168-172; 1986 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kenya; Baboons; Reproductive behavior; Cage
 rearing; Design
 
 
 169                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 An enriched commune housing system for laboratory rats--a
 preliminary view. Batchelor, G.R. \u Institute of
 Orthopaedics, Stanmore, Middlesex Sussex : The Institute; 1993
 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technicians v. 44 (3): p. 201-214; 1993 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Cages; Enrichment; Animal welfare; Animal
 behavior
 
 Abstract:  Most current methods of housing laboratory rats
 allow very little enrichment to be accommodated (Figure 1). In
 addition, a floor space of 1600 cm2 and a height of 20 cm
 surely does not permit normal social behaviour to occur
 (Figure 2). The view put forward here, therefore, is that
 current housing systems for rats are ethologically,
 physiologically and psychologically damaging, inappropriate
 and restrictive and should gradually be replaced. An enriched
 commune housing system with a view to commercial application,
 has been designed and constructed, albeit in a fairly crude
 form. A grant obtained from the RSPCA will enable video
 recording of social and individual behaviors to be analysed,
 including infra-red techniques during the hours of darkness.
 In addition, it is hoped that some form of activity index may
 be constructed to demonstrate the strong exploratory instincts
 that laboratory rats possess but are currently frustrated in
 their attempts to show. This work is in its infancy and the
 subject of this presentation is a preliminary, objective
 assessment of some of the background to some behavioural
 aspects of laboratory animal welfare, as well as focusing on
 the rat commune housing system itself.
 
 
 170                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Enriching the lives of captive primates: issues and problems.
 Novak, M.A.; Drewsen, K.H.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 161-182.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Capture of animals; Animal welfare;
 Psychological factors; Environment; Cages; Social behavior
 
 
 171                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.N48
 Enrichment techniques for confined primates.
 O'Neill, P.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Center; 1987.
 Newsletter - Scientists Center for Animal Welfare v. 9 (4): p.
 5, 7-8. ill; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal welfare; Animal housing
 
 
 172                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Enterocecocolitis associated with Escherichia coli and
 Campylobacter-like organisms in a hamster (Mesocricetus
 auratus) colony.
 Dillehay, D.L.; Paul, K.S.; Boosinger, T.R.; Fox, J.G.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (1): p.
 12-16; 1994 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hamsters; Enterocolitis; Cecum; Escherichia coli;
 Campylobacter; Histopathology; Colon; Small intestine;
 Pathogenesis
 
 Abstract:  Sporadic diarrhea and weight loss were observed in
 a breeding colony of Syrian hamsters during a 2-year period.
 Thirteen adult hamsters with diarrhea, anorexia, and weight
 loss were examined. Histologic lesions consisted of diffuse
 nonsuppurative enterocecocolitis and multifocal epithelial
 proliferation in the cecum and colon. Goblet cell hyperplasia
 was extensive in the colonic mucosa of many hamsters. The
 hamsters in this colony had not been treated with antibiotics
 nor was Clostridium difficile isolated from any of the
 hamsters. In contrast to typical proliferative ileitis in
 hamsters, most hamsters involved in this outbreak were mature
 adults rather than weanlings, and lesions were predominantly
 inflammatory rather than proliferative and involved small
 intestine, cecum, and colon rather than ileum. The isolation
 of beta-hemolytic Escherichia coli and demonstration of
 Campylobacter-like organisms by transmission electron
 microscopy and Warthin-Starry staining suggest that these two
 agents were involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.
 Further studies, however, are needed to investigate the
 pathogenesis of this enteric syndrome in hamsters.
 
 
 173                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Environmental enrichment: a review.
 Chamove, A.S.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (3): p. 155-178. ill; 1989 Dec.  Literature
 review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environmental factors; Enrichment;
 Animal welfare; Animal behavior; Cage size; Space
 requirements; Cages
 
 
 174                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Environmental enrichment and exploration.
 Mench, J.A.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1994 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 23 (2): p. 38-41; 1994 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Environment; Enrichment;
 Animal welfare; Animal behavior; Exploration; Animal housing
 
 
 175                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Environmental enrichment: behavioral responses of rhesus to
 puzzle feeders. Bloom, K.R.; Cook, M.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Jul.
 Lab animal v. 18 (5): p. 25, 27, 29, 31. ill; 1989 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Environment; Animal housing;
 Cages; Equipment; Feed dispensers; Animal behavior
 
 
 176                        NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.751
 Environmental enrichment devices and procedures for captive
 nonhuman primates Lyna M. Watson.
 Watson, Lyna M.
 New England Regional Primate Research Center
 Cambridge, MA : Harvard Medical School, New England Regional
 Primate Research Center,; 1989.
 1 videocassette (30 min.) : sd., col.; 1/2 in.  VHS format.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Housing; Videorecordings;
 Primates; Videorecordings; Macaca mulatta; Videorecordings;
 Macaca fascicularis; Videorecordings; Callithrix jacchus;
 Videorecordings; Saguinus oedipus; Videorecordings
 
 Abstract:  This videotape describes and demonstrates the
 environmental enrichment devices and procedures used for
 singly and group housed macaques and New World monkeys at the
 New England Regional Primate Research Center.
 
 
 177                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Environmental enrichment for laboratory mice (Mus musculus).
 Ward, G.E.; DeMille, D.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (3): p. 149-156; 1991 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Environment; Enrichment; Cages; Bottles;
 Animal behavior
 
 Abstract:  The mouse, (Mus musculus), is commonly distributed
 throughout all continents of the world and must be considered
 as one of the most successfully adapted animal species on
 earth. Thorburn, (1921) described the natural habits of this
 animal species and commented upon its preferred occupation of
 dwelling houses "even before they were completed". This same
 author described the mouse as a good climber and also its
 gnawing abilities used to enter cupboards and store rooms in
 order to nest and rear its young. In addition and more
 recently, other authors have considered that laboratory mouse
 populations are tightly organised into territorially
 restricted social units. DeFries and Mclearn, 1972, Lidicker,
 1976), with evidence that mice adopt unambiguously territorial
 behaviour in large enclosures which may be very stable,
 (Crowcroft, 1955). There is also evidence of aggressive
 behaviour toward migrant animals through these territories,
 (Reimer and Petras, 1967). It is within this framework that we
 must consider the standard laboratory mouse which, whilst
 being genetically manipulated during many generations to
 produce an animal model markedly different to its ancestors,
 nevertheless still retains most if not all of the
 characteristics of its wild forbears, such as curiosity,
 adaptability, intelligence and male aggression. With all of
 these inherent characteristics, it must be considered as
 doubtful whether the current bland and unenriched laboratory
 animal cage environment is either sufficient or able to fulfil
 the legitimate requirements of this species.
 
 
 178                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.N48
 Environmental enrichment for laboratory primates.
 Line, S.; Markowitz, H.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Center; 1987.
 Newsletter - Scientists Center for Animal Welfare v. 9 (2): p.
 3, 5. ill; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal experiments; Animal welfare;
 Environment; Facilities
 
 
 179                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Environmental enrichment for large scale marmoset units.
 Heath, M.; Libretto, S.E.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technicians v. 44 (3): p. 163-173; 1993 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Callithrix jacchus; Marmosets; Environment;
 Cages; Enrichment; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  The environment can be enriched for large numbers
 of marmosets, through every day routine procedures. Items such
 as fruit chains, pieces of hollow tubing, foraging boxes and
 wooden perches or platforms provide a more stimulating
 environment and promote innate behaviour that is otherwise
 restricted or suppressed in the laboratory cage. Cage
 furniture is not the total answer to environmental enrichment;
 capable staff, social grouping, variable feeding regimes,
 presentation of food, cage cleaning and animal handling are
 also important considerations. Animal technicians are
 encouraged to participate in such projects and to contribute
 their ideas into future plans. Having both the closest daily
 contact with, and dedication to, the marmosets, they are the
 best people to both implement and evaluate environmental
 change. Reactions of marmosets to environmental innovation are
 described, and shown to vary with social structure and
 experience.
 
 
 180                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Environmental enrichment for monkeys used in behavioral
 toxicology studies. Gilbert, S.G.; Wrenshall, E.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 244-254.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Environment; Cages; Exercise;
 Laboratories; Toxicology; Programs
 
 
 181                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Environmental enrichment in a large animal facility.
 DeLuca, A.M.; Kranda, K.C.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Jan.
 Lab animal v. 21 (1): p. 38-44; 1992 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Environment; Enrichment;
 Animal behavior
 
 
 182                            NAL Call. No.: SF407.P7T49 1991
 An environmental enrichment program for caged rhesus monkeys
 at the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center., 1st ed.;.
 Reinhardt, V.
 Washington, DC : American Psychological Association ;; 1991.
 Through the looking glass: issues of psychological well-being
 in captive nonhuman primates / edited by Melinda A. Novak and
 Andrew J. Petto. p. 149-159; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wisconsin; Macaca mulatta; Environment;
 Enrichment; Research institutes; Animal welfare
 
 
 183                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Environmental ultrasound in laboratories and animal houses: a
 possible cause for concern in the welfare and use of
 laboratory animals. Sales, G.D.; Wilson, K.J.; Spencer,
 K.E.V.; Milligan, S.R. London : Royal Society of Medicine
 Services; 1988 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 22 (4): p. 369-375; 1988 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal experiments; Animal
 welfare; Animal housing; Laboratories; Ultrasound; Environment
 
 Abstract:  Many laboratory animals are known to be sensitive
 to sounds (ultrasounds) beyond the nominal upper limit (20
 kHz) of the human hearing range. Sources of sound in
 laboratories and animal houses were examined to determine the
 extent of ambient ultrasound. Of 39 sources monitored, 24 were
 found to emit ultrasonic sounds. Many of these (e.g. cage
 washers and hoses) also produced sound in the audible range.
 Running taps, squeaky chairs and rotating glass stoppers
 created particularly high sound pressure levels and contained
 frequencies to over 100 kHz. The oscilloscopes and visual
 display units investigated provided particular cause for
 concern as they emitted sounds that were entirely ultrasonic
 and therefore were apparently silent. Ambient ultrasound
 therefore appears to be common in laboratories and animal
 houses. It is suggested that its effect on laboratory animals
 should be investigated and guidelines on acceptable levels be
 formulated.
 
 
 184                                NAL Call. No.: QL737.C22C36
 Environmental variables and animal care.
 Besch, E.L.
 Bethesda, MD : Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1990 Jan.
 Canine research environment / edited by Joy A. Mench and Lee
 Krulisch. p. 53-57; 1990 Jan.  Paper presented at a conference
 held by the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, June 22,
 1989, Bethesda, Md. Question and answer session p. 51-52. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Animal housing; Environment; Laboratory
 animals
 
 
 185                                  NAL Call. No.: 47.8 Am33P
 Environment-immune interactions.
 Dietert, R.R.; Golemboski, K.A.; Austic, R.E.
 Champaign, IL : Poultry Science Association, 1921-; 1994 Jul.
 Poultry science v. 73 (7): p. 1062-1076; 1994 Jul.  Paper
 presented at the symposium "Current Advances in Avian
 Immunology," July 1993, East Lansing, Michigan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chickens; Disease resistance; Immune competence;
 Genotype environment interaction; Stress factors; Antibody
 formation; Assays; Immunological deficiency; Nutrient
 deficiencies; Literature reviews
 
 Abstract:  The need for effective immune function for the
 maintenance of health has been clearly established in both
 agriculturally significant animal species and humans.
 Intensive agricultural practices present production species
 with numerous disease challenges during the rearing period.
 Environmental factors represent a ubiquitous, yet frequently
 manageable, category of immunomodulators that can influence
 immune performance and ultimately disease susceptibility or
 resistance. However, strategies for assessing overall immune
 potential have not been widely implemented for agricultural
 species. This is in contrast to the use of immune evaluation
 for human health considerations. Immune assessment relative to
 environmental-immune interactions can produce benefits in two
 areas. First, the efficiency of the production operation can
 be enhanced. Second, the welfare of the animals during the
 production cycle can be optimized. This paper presents an
 overview of environmental factors known to influence the
 immune function of poultry and the opportunities to manage
 environmental factors to benefit the health of the animals. In
 addition, the paper discusses the status of immunological
 assessment for humans and laboratory animals and proposes
 potential immune assessment panels that could serve as a tool
 to optimize the environmental management of poultry
 populations.
 
 
 186                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Eradication of encephalitozoonosis in rabbit breeding colonies
 by carbon immunoassay.
 Waller, T.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 385-387; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sweden; Rabbits; Animal breeding; Protozoal
 infections; Encephalitozoon cuniculi; Disease control; Carbon;
 Immunoassay
 
 
 187                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Establishing colonies of specific pathogen free (SPF) guinea
 pigs and rabbits. Kruijt, B.C.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 439-445. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Rabbits; Specific pathogen free
 state; Animal breeding; Laboratory rearing
 
 
 188                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Establishment and control of a parvovirus-free dog colony.
 Chapman, L.L.; Quimby, F.W.; Gilmartin, J.E.; Chapman, M.J.;
 Allen, L.M. Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 19-21; 1985. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Pathogen free animals; Animal breeding;
 Canine parvovirus; Disease control
 
 
 189                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Establishment of a Chinese hamster breeding colony.
 Calland, C.J.; Wightman, S.R.; Neal, S.B.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1986 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 36 (2): p.
 183-185; 1986 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chinese hamster; Animal breeding methods;
 Reproductive performance; Record keeping
 
 
 190                                  NAL Call. No.: HV4701.A34
 Ethics, welfare, and laboratory animal management.
 Allan, D.J.; Blackshaw, J.K.
 Boston : Martinus Nijhoff Publishers; 1986-1987.
 Advances in animal welfare science. p. 1-8; 1986-1987. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal experiments; Laboratory animals; Ethics;
 Animal welfare; Animal testing alternatives; Laboratory
 rearing
 
 
 191                               NAL Call. No.: QP1.A2 SUPPL.
 Ethology in animal quarters.
 Meyerson, B.J.
 Stockholm : Blackwell Scientific Publications; 1986.
 Acta physiologica Scandinavica v. 128 (554): p. 24-31; 1986. 
 Paper presented at the "Second CFN Symposium on the Ethics of
 Animal Experimentation," August 12-14, 1985, Stockholm,
 Sweden.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Environment; Animal housing;
 Ethics; Animal behavior
 
 
 192                                   NAL Call. No.: HV4761.A5
 European Parliament condemns crates, battery cages and sow
 stalls but US guide condones them.
 Washington, D.C. : The Institute; 1987.
 The Animal Welfare Institute quarterly v. 36 (3): p. 16-17.
 ill; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal welfare; Livestock housing; Battery cages;
 Crates; Parliament; Guidelines; Laboratory animals
 
 
 193                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Evaluation of a one-way airflow system in an animal room based
 on counts of airborne dust particles and bacteria and
 measurements of ammonia levels. Yamauchi, C.; Obara, T.;
 Fukuyama, N.; Ueda, T.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (1): p. 7-15; 1989 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan; Rats; Animal housing; Air flow; Ammonia;
 Dust; Bacteria; Air microbiology; Personnel; Allergies
 
 Abstract:  Air cleanliness in the working area of an animal
 room equipped with a conventional turbulent flow air
 distribution systems was compared with that in a similar room
 fitted with a one-way-flow air distribution system; in this,
 the supply air flowed from the working area through the racks
 of cages and was removed from the exhaust side. Before the
 introduction of animals, the air in the working and exhaust
 areas of both rooms was ascertained to be Class 100. With
 animals in situ, however, whereas in the turbulent airflow
 room both the work space and exhaust air reached about Class
 10 000 (with particle counts, bacterial counts and ammonia
 levels being almost the same) in the one-way-flow room, the
 air in the work space only went up to about Class 1000. With
 the addition of sliding doors or curtains in front of the rack
 in the one-way-flow room the work space air was maintained at
 Class 100 with almost no dust particles over 1 micromole in
 size, airborne bacteria or ammonia being detectable. A
 comparison of all factors measured showed that whereas in the
 turbulent flow room the contamination of the work space air
 was 91% of that of the exhaust air, in the one-way-flow room
 it was only 47%, with curtains added this was reduced to 7%
 and with sliding doors to only 2%. In the latter case,
 contamination levels increased markedly on both sides during
 and immediately after cage changing, but recovered to the pre-
 cage changing levels within 30 min in the personnel working ar
 ea within 60 min on the exhaust side.
 
 
 194                               NAL Call. No.: aHV4762.A3A64
 Evaluation of attempts to enrich the environment of single-
 caged non-human primates.
 Line, S.W.; Markowitz, H.; Morgan, K.N.; Strong, S.
 Beltsville, Md. : Animal Welfare Information Center, National
 Agricultural Library, [1989?]; 1989 Sep.
 Animal care and use in behavioral research : regulations,
 issues, and applications : based on an invited paper session
 presented at the 1988 meeting of the Animal Behavior Society /
 Janis Wiley Driscoll, editor. p. 103-117; 1989 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environment; Enrichment; Animal
 welfare; Social interaction; Cage size; Toys; Foraging
 
 
 195                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Evaluation of countermeasures for reduction of mouse airborne
 allergens. Sakaguchi, M.; Inouye, S.; Miyazawa, H.; Kamimura,
 H.; Yamazaki, S. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1990 Nov. Laboratory animal science
 v. 40 (6): p. 613-615; 1990 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Allergens; Mice; Sex differences; Air filters;
 Litter; Maize cobs; Prealbumin; Albumins; Air; Occupational
 hazards
 
 Abstract:  Three kinds of countermeasures for reduction of
 mouse airborne allergens were evaluated with use of an air
 sampler and immunochemical methods. Mouse cages and the
 sampler were placed inside a flexible-film isolator, and
 concentrations of mouse major allergens in the air were
 measured. The levels of the airborne allergens, prealbumin and
 albumin, generated by 10 males, were 3,050 and 492 pg/m3,
 respectively. Those by 10 females were lower, 317 and 270
 pg/m3, respectively. When mouse cages were covered with a
 filter cap, the airborne allergens inside the isolator were
 decreased by 90%. When corncob was used as bedding in place of
 wood shavings, the airborne allergens were decreased by 57 and
 77%, respectively. Therefore, for reduction of mouse airborne
 allergens, we recommend using female mice, covering the cages
 with filter caps, and using corncob bedding.
 
 
 196                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 An evaluation of intra-cage ventilation in three animal caging
 systems. Keller, L.S.F.; White, W.J.; Snider, M.T.; Lang, C.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (3): p.
 237-242. ill; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Cages; Ventilation; Gases;
 Pollutants; Animal health
 
 Abstract:  Although temperature and relative humidity have
 been quantitated and their effects on research data studied,
 few studies have measured the air turnover rates at cage
 level. We evaluated the air distribution and air turnover
 rates in unoccupied shoe-box mouse cages, filter-top covered
 cages and shoe-box mouse cages housed in flexible film
 isolator by using discontinuous gas chromatography/mass
 spectrometry and smoke. Results showed that air turnover was
 most rapid in the unoccupied shoe-box mouse cage and slowest
 in the filter-top covered cage. Placing mice in the filter-top
 covered cage did not significantly improve the air turnover
 rate. Although filter-top covered cages reduce cage-to-cage
 transmission of disease, the poor air flow observed within
 these cages could lead to a buildup of gaseous pollutants that
 may adversely affect the animal's health.
 
 
 197                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Evaluation of isolator caging systems for protection of mice
 against challenge with mouse hepatitis virus.
 Lipman, N.S.; Corning, B.F.; Saifuddin, M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1993 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 27 (2): p. 134-140; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Viral hepatitis
 
 Abstract:  Two isolator caging systems were evaluated against
 challenge with MHV-Y, an enterotropic strain of mouse
 hepatitis virus. The systems were similar in that they both
 used an identical shoebox cage equipped with a polycarbonate
 filter top incorporating a Reemay filter. They differed in
 that one system supplied HEPA-filtered air through a grommet
 in the filter lid so that the cage was pressurized slightly. A
 rack holding 60 cages (30 front and back) was utilized. Thirty
 cages without filter tops housed one mouse each that had been
 infected orally with 19000 ID50 of MHV-Y and an uninfected
 cagemate. The remaining 30 cages, each housing 2 uninfected
 mice were divided into 3 groups of 10 cages. Group I cages
 (controls) had no Alter top; Group II cages were equipped with
 filter tops; and Group III were equipped with filter tops and
 intracage HEPA-filtered air. The cages housing uninfected mice
 were interspersed between, above, below and behind cages
 housing infected mice. The uninfected mice were maintained in
 contact with the MHV-Y infected mice for 8 weeks. Transmission
 of MHV-Y was determined serologically by indirect ELISA. All
 mice housed within the Group I cages (control) seroconverted
 to MHV, while only 4 mice (2 cages) seroconverted in Group II,
 and no mice seroconverted in Group III.
 
 
 198                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Evaluation of social enrichment for aged rhesus macaques.
 Reinhardt, V.; Hurwitz, S.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 44 (1): p. 53-57; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Social environment
 
 Abstract:  The effect of a compatible companion on the
 behaviour and bodyweight of eight previously single-caged,
 31-36 years old rhesus macaques was assessed 16 months after
 pair formation. The aged subjects preferred to stay, in close
 proximity with their companion even though this reduced their
 available cage space. They spent on average 21% of the time (3
 one-hour observations in the morning, at noon and in the
 afternoon) interacting with the companion in noninjurious
 species-typical ways. Affiliative interactions, i.e., grooming
 and huddling, accounted for more than 99% of total interaction
 time. Sharing a cage with a compatible con-specific did not
 jeopardize the subjects' general health, as reflected in their
 body weight development. It was concluded that single-caged
 rhesus macaques readily adapt to living with a companion who
 provides them with a species-adequate environment for the
 expression of their inherent social disposition.
 
 
 199                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Evaluation of the American kestrel (Falco sparverius) as a
 laboratory research animal.
 Bird, D.M.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 3-9. ill; 1985. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Falco; Chickens; Japanese quails; Ducks;
 Laboratory animals; Facilities; Artificial insemination; Semen
 characters
 
 
 200                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Evaluation of the long-term effectiveness of two environmental
 enrichment objects for singly caged rhesus macaques.
 Reinhart, V.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 18 (6): p. 31-33. ill; 1989 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Environment
 
 
 201                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Evaluation of the preference to and behavioral effects of an
 enriched environment on male rhesus monkeys.
 Bayne, K.A.L.; Hurst, J.K.; Dexter, S.L.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (1): p.
 38-45; 1992 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Male animals; Environment;
 Enrichment; Perches; Toys; Animal behavior; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  Two environments were provided to laboratory rhesus
 monkeys to determine if the animals spent more time (for the
 purposes of this study, defined as the cage side preference)
 in an enriched cage side than an unenriched cage side. The
 side (right or left) of a double-wide cage in which the animal
 spent the most time (as determined by Chi square analysis) was
 initially determined during baseline observations. The
 "nonpreferred" side was then enriched during the experimental
 phase of the study. The enrichment consisted of a perch, a
 Tug-A-Toy suspended inside the cage, a Kong toy suspended on
 the outside of the cage, and a grooming board mounted on the
 outside of the cage. No statistically significant changes in
 use of the enrichments were detected over time. Fifty percent
 of the animals switched cage side preference to the enriched
 side during the study. All subjects showed reduced behavioral
 pathology during exposure to the enriched environment with a
 return of behavioral pathology when the enrichments were
 removed.
 
 
 202                                 NAL Call. No.: SF481.2.F56
 Evaporate cooling versus tunnel ventilation.
 Jacobs, R.D.; Bucklin, R.A.; Harms, R.H.; Sloan, D.R.
 Gainesville, Fla. : Florida Agricultural Extension Service;
 1992. Proceedings of the ... Florida Poultry Institute (501):
 p. 9; 1992.  Meeting held Oct 13-14, 1992, Gainesville,
 Florida.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Florida; Poultry housing; Evaporative cooling;
 Artificial ventilation
 
 
 203                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Examining environmental enrichment.
 Chamove, A.S.; Anderson, J.R.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 183-202.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environment; Cage size; Design; Animal
 behavior; Stress
 
 
 204                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Experience with mammoth isolators.
 Nikkels, R.J.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 289-293. ill; 1985.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Isolation; Gnotobiotic animals;
 Equipment; Facilities
 
 
 205                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The experimental animal unit (E.A.U.): structural
 modifications and improvements utilising sensible management
 practices.
 Carvalho, A.; Sydney, Australia; Martinic, G.; Zafiriou, N.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (3): p. 197-217; 1992 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Animal
 husbandry
 
 
 206                                    NAL Call. No.: 470 SCI2
 Experts ponder simian well-being.
 Holden, C.
 Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of
 Science; 1988 Sep30.
 Science v. 241 (4874): p. 1753-1755. ill; 1988 Sep30.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Primates; Animal welfare; Cages;
 Environment; Animal experiments; Usda
 
 
 207                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Facility design: choosing the right flooring.
 Douglas, F.; Harris, H.J.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1993 May.
 Lab animal v. 22 (5): p. 51-54, 56-57; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratories; Floors
 
 
 208                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Facility management: efficient management of office files.
 Holmes, D.D.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 15 (3): p. 39-40; 1986 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Records; File management;
 Cages; Equipment
 
 
 209                             NAL Call. No.: HV4764.U54 1992
 Farm Animal and Research Facilities Protection Act of 1992
 report (to accompany H.R. 2407).
 United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture
 Washington : D.C.? : U.S. G.P.O., 1992-; 1992-9999; Y
 1.1/8:102-498/pt.1-. v. ; 24 cm. (Rept. / 102d Congress, 2d
 session, House of Representatives ; 102-498).  Caption title. 
 Distributed to some depository libraries in microfiche. 
 Shipping list no.: 92-0399-P (pt. 1).  "April 9, 1992"--Pt. 1.
 Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Animal rights activists; Fines (Penalties);
 Laboratory animals; Domestic animals; Laboratories
 
 
 210                                    NAL Call. No.: 41.8 Av5
 A feather-trap system for the removal of chicken feathers from
 laboratory sewage.
 Beard, C.W.; Hammond, J.; Whittemore, A.
 Kennett Square, Pa. : American Association of Avian
 Pathologists; 1992 Oct. Avian diseases v. 36 (4): p.
 1028-1030; 1992 Oct.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chickens; Laboratory animals; Laboratory
 equipment; Feathers; Removal; Sewage
 
 Abstract:  A simple feather-trap system is described for use
 on the drain lines of buildings housing poultry for research
 or other purposes where floors are frequently washed. The trap
 uses disposable plastic-mesh bags that can efficiently remove
 almost all feathers from the water, preventing sewer lines
 from being blocked by compacted feathers. Critical
 measurements and operational procedures are described.
 
 
 211                                  NAL Call. No.: QL785.A725
 Feeding ecology and laboratory predatory behavior toward live
 and artificial moving prey in seven rodent species.
 Timberlake, W.; Washburne, D.L.
 Austin, Tex. : Psychonomic Society; 1989 Feb.
 Animal learning &amp; behavior v. 17 (1): p. 2-11; 1989 Feb. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Predation; Feeding behavior; Laboratory
 rearing; Cannibalism
 
 Abstract:  The present research related the feeding ecology of
 seven rodent species to the reactions of laboratory-reared and
 prey-inexperienced members of each species both to live prey
 and to an artificial moving stimulus predicting food pellets.
 Feeding ecology was determined by the degree of carnivory,
 based on reported stomach contents and observations of
 feeding. Experiment 1 assessed predatory reactions to a live
 cricket placed in each animal's home cage. Killing and latency
 of eating the cricket were directly related to the degree of
 reported carnivory on moderately fast-moving arthropods.
 Experiment 2 examined behavior toward a rolling ball bearing
 that predicted delivery of food. Average percentages of trials
 with approach or contact of the bearing, and the conditional
 probability of a mouth contact were all positively related to
 the degree of reported carnivory and to cricket predation in
 Experiment 1. In addition, the topography of ball bearing
 contact for a species often resembled its topography of
 cricket contact. We conclude that (1) rodent predatory
 behavior can be studied in the laboratory using appropriate
 artificial stimuli and prey-inexperienced subjects, and (2)
 the predatory behavior of a species is based on underlying
 appetitive organization related to carnivory, including
 differential sensitivity to stimulus movement, motor
 preorganization, and susceptibility to conditioning. This
 appetitive organization appears to influence responding to
 both live and artificial prey.
 
 
 212                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Field trial of a live streptomycin dependent Pasteurella
 multocida serotype A:12 vaccine in rabbits.
 Deeb, B.J.; DiGiacomo, R.F.; Bernard, B.L.; Silbernagel, S.M.;
 Chengappa, M.M. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science
 v. 39 (3): p. 229-233; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Vaccination; Streptomycin; Pasteurella
 multocida; Serotypes; Live vaccines; Field experimentation
 
 Abstract:  A live, steptomycin dependent, Pasteurella
 multocida (SDPM) serotype A:12 vaccine was evaluated for
 preventing pasteurellosis in two commercial rabbitries.
 Rabbits were inoculated intranasally at 5 weeks old with
 either 0.25 ml of vaccine containing 10(8) colony forming
 units/ml or 0.25 ml of diluent (control). A proportion of
 rabbits received a second intranasal inoculation 1 month
 later. Partial protection against P. multocida infection was
 observed 1 and 2 months after inoculation in rabbits given
 only one dose of vaccine. The incidence of clinical signs of
 pasteurellosis was similar in vaccinated and nonvaccinated
 market-age rabbits inoculated 4 to 6 weeks previously. In does
 maintained in the breeding colony, P. multocida infection and
 upper respiratory disease occurred more frequently in
 vaccinated than nonvaccinated rabbits. Humoral antibody
 responses (IgA, IgM, IgG) followed longitudinally were similar
 in vaccinated and nonvaccinated does. Hence, the SDPM vaccine
 was not efficacious in controlling P. multocida infection at
 these two rabbitries.
 
 
 213                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A forced-air ventilation system for rodent cages.
 Wu, D.; Joiner, G.N.; McFarland, A.R.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (5): p.
 499-504. ill; 1985 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Cages; Ventilation
 
 
 214                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Free-environment rooms as alternative housing for squirrel
 monkeys. King, J.E.; Norwood, V.R.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 102-114.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Squirrel monkeys; Animal housing; Cages;
 Environment; Loose housing
 
 
 215                                    NAL Call. No.: 410 IN84
 The future of laboratory animal genetics.
 Festing, M.F.W.
 Oslo, Norway : The International Council for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985. ICLAS bulletin (56): p. 18-22; 1985.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Genetics; Animal breeding;
 Techniques
 
 
 216                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Gene targeting technology for creating transgenic models of
 lymphopoiesis. Huang, M.T.F.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (2): p.
 156-159; 1993 Apr.  Paper presented at a conference entitled
 "The Scid Mouse in Biomedical and Agricultural Research,"
 August 5-7, 1992, Guelph, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Transgenic animals; Mice; Lymphocytes
 
 Abstract:  Naturally occurring immunodeficient mouse strains
 express a variety of genetic defects in myeloid and/or
 lymphoid cell development. These strains have served as
 valuable animal models for studying immune cell
 differentiation and mechanisms of transplant rejection. Some
 of the most commonly used strains carry mutations at the nude,
 scid, beige, and/or xid loci. Gene targeting technology can
 now be used to directly modify endogenous alleles via
 homologous recombination with exogenous DNA. By performing DNA
 targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells, germline transmission
 of these modifications can be obtained by breeding chimeras
 generated from cloned ES cells. This approach can be used to
 target the inactivation, modification, or replacement of
 specific genes and has been used to examine the role of
 several alleles in hematopoiesis. This review describes the
 use of this technology to generate mutations that influence
 the development and function of T and B lymphocytes.
 
 
 217                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Genetic diversity of laboratory gray short-tailed opossums
 (Monodelphis domestica): effect of newly introduced wild-
 caught animals. Van Oorschot, R.A.H.; Williams-Blangero, S.;
 VandeBerg, J.L. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1992 Jun. Laboratory animal science
 v. 42 (3): p. 255-260; 1992 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pernambuco; Paraiba; Opossums; Monodelphis
 domestica; Genetic differences; Phenotypes; Temporal
 variation; Genetic polymorphism; Gene frequency;
 Heterozygosity
 
 Abstract:  The colony of gray, short-tailed opossums
 (Monodelphis domestica) at the Southwest Foundation for
 Biomedical Research, the primary supplier of this species for
 research purposes, was founded with nine animals trapped in
 1978 in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Since 1984, 14 newly
 acquired founders from the state of Paraiba, Brazil have
 contributed to the gene pool of the colony. The animals from
 Paraiba and their descendants are significantly larger than
 the founders from Pernambuco and their descendants. The two
 groups also differ significantly in several measurements of
 morphologic traits. The changes in proportional contribution
 of each founder to the colony, and changes in inbreeding
 coefficients during the colony's history, are evaluated. Using
 previously established markers and three newly identified
 markers (ACP2, APRT, and DIAL), we show that the Paraiba-
 derived animals differ significantly from the original
 founders in allele frequencies and heterozygosity. The genetic
 diversity of the colony has been substantially increased by
 acquisition of the new founders from Paraiba. The colony is
 highly polymorphic, with 22.2% of loci surveyed by protein
 electrophoresis being variable. We conclude that the genetic
 differences between populations and among projects within the
 colony should be considered in future colony management
 procedures and in selection of experimental subjects.
 
 
 218                                    NAL Call. No.: TP1.J686
 Genetic manipulation of laboratory and farm animals.
 Bulfield, G.
 London : Elsevier Applied Science Publishers; 1988.
 Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology v. 43 (4): p.
 265-272; 1988. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Livestock; Poultry; Laboratory animals; Genetic
 engineering; Hazards; Animal welfare; Animal breeding
 
 
 219                                NAL Call. No.: SF407.R38G46
 Genetic monitoring of inbred strains of rats a manual on
 colony management, basic monitoring techniques, and genetic
 variants of the laboratory rat. Hedrich, Hans J.; Adams, M.
 International Council for Laboratory Animal Science
 Stuttgart ; New York : Gustav Fischer Verlag,; 1990.
 xii, 539 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats as laboratory animals; Rats; Inbreeding
 
 
 220                              NAL Call. No.: DISS  F1992302
 Gesamtkorperfettgehalt und Fettzellgrosse bei weiblichen
 Mausen des Stammes "Heiligenberg" in Abhangigkeit von Alter,
 Zuchtnutzung und Haltungsflachengrosse / vorgelegt von Peter
 Schmidt  [Total body fat and fat cell size of female
 "Heiligenberg" mice and the relationship to age, breeding use
 and size of living space].
 Schmidt, Peter
 Hannover : [s.n.],; 1992.
 74 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.  Summary in English.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 64-73).
 
 Language:  German
 
 
 221                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Giardiasis in laboratory-housed squirrel monkeys: a
 retrospective study. Hamlen, H.J.; Lawrence, J.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (3): p.
 235-239; 1994 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Saimiri sciureus; Giardiasis; Giardia; Incidence;
 Diarrhea; Symptoms
 
 Abstract:  Giardia infection was diagnosed in a 1.5-year-old,
 group-housed, female squirrel monkey with diarrhea. A
 retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence
 of Giardia in the 190-member colony. Records were analyzed to
 determine whether any one of the following conditions applied:
 the animal had clinical signs referable to the
 gastrointestinal system; a fecal examination for ova and
 parasites was performed; gastrointestinal parasitism was
 revealed by necropsy; or a culture of samples from the
 gastrointestinal tract was performed. Analysis revealed a
 total of 19 monkeys, 68% (13/19) of which had gastrointestinal
 clinical signs. Giardia cysts were recovered from 33% (4/12)
 of monkeys with gastrointestinal signs in which fecal
 examinations were done. The yearly incidence of diarrhea in
 the colony was low at 0.61%; however, 33% (2/6) of the monkeys
 with diarrhea were positive for Giardia. Six animals had blood
 in the feces or rectal prolapse, in the absence of diarrhea,
 and 30% ( 2/6) of these animals were positive for Giardia. Of
 six animals without gastrointestinal clinical signs, 50% (3/6)
 had giardiasis, which was listed as an incidental finding. In
 light of these findings, an additional 16 healthy animals were
 examined for Giardia. Giardia cysts were recovered from 50%
 (3/6) of males and 70% (7/10) of females from which samples
 were obtained. Additionally, clean water consumed by the
 animals was negative for Giardia cysts, and facility waste
 water was positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report
 of giardiasis in squirrel monkeys.
 
 
 222                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Good laboratory practice, 1976-1992, an overview.
 Dent, N.J.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (1): p. 7-9; 1992 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratories; Regulations; European communities
 
 Abstract:  Whilst the concept and procedures of Good
 Laboratory Practice are certainly nothing new, certain changes
 have occurred in both responsibilities and attitudes to this
 "Good Practice" in the 16 years since its inception by the
 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States of
 America. It has certain implications for the animal
 technologist and benefits for the industry. It has not been
 seen as the bureaucratic straight-jacket that was initially
 envisaged, and in actual fact is now regarded as one of
 several "Good Practices" and part of a companys overall Total
 Quality Management (TQM) programme. The benefits that have
 clearly been seen following the implementation of Good
 Laboratory Practice (GLP) are: a greater professionalism, less
 animal use, better science, a much more early thought process
 resulting in clear documentation and the ability to either
 review or to repeat studies of a similar nature at a
 considerable time in the future.
 
 
 223                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Group housing: meeting the physical and social needs of the
 laboratory rabbit. Love, J.A.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (1): p.
 5-11; 1994 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Rabbit housing; Groups; Animal behavior;
 Animal welfare; Animal experiments; Costs; Space requirements
 
 
 224                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Group housing on floor pens and environmental enrichment in
 sandy lop rabbits. I.
 Batchelor, G.R.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (2): p. 109-120; 1991 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Floor pens; Groups; Environment;
 Enrichment; Animal behavior; Growth rate
 
 Abstract:  During a twelve month period of observation, the
 behavioural repertoire of group housed rabbits was found to be
 greatly enhanced compared with that of singly caged rabbits.
 Increased space which allowed freedom of movement in all
 directions, together with environmental enrichment,
 significantly improved the quality of life. The group housed
 rabbits' ability to interact with their peers lead to varying
 amounts of aggression and the probable establishment of a
 hierarchical order. This may be disadvantageous for the lower
 ranking animals, although perhaps not as disadvantageous as
 life in solitary confinement.
 
 
 225                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Group-housing rabbits.
 Love, J.A.; Hammond, K.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1991 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 20 (8): p. 37-38, 40-43; 1991 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Pens; Animal behavior
 
 
 226                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 The guide: a comparison of the 1985 and 1978 editions.
 Knauff, D.R.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 May.
 Lab animal v. 15 (4): p. 45-47, 49, 51; 1986 May.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal experiments; Animal
 housing; Surgery; Guides; Publications
 
 
 227                          NAL Call. No.: HV4890.T78J37 1986
 Guidelines for housing and care of laboratory animals.
 James Cook University of North Queensland. Experimentation
 Ethics Review Committee
 Townsville, Australia : Issued by the Committee,; 1986.
 ii, 34, x p. : ill. ; 30 cm.  Cover title.  March 1986. 
 Includes bibliographical references (p. 33-34).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare
 
 
 228                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Guidelines for prevention of herpesvirus simiae (B-virus)
 infection in monkey handlers.
 Kaplan, J.E.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (6): p.
 709-712; 1987 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Herpetoviridae; Disease transmission;
 Disease prevention; Facilities; Handling; Screening;
 Guidelines
 
 
 229                                   NAL Call. No.: 41.8 V641
 Guidelines for veterinary surgeons employed in scientific
 procedure establishments and breeding and supplying
 establishments. London : British Veterinary Association; 1987
 Jan03.
 The Veterinary record v. 120 (1): p. 17-19; 1987 Jan03.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Veterinarians; Guidelines;
 Animal experiments; Animal health; Animal welfare; Laboratory
 animals
 
 
 230                                    NAL Call. No.: SF406.G8
 Guidelines on the care of laboratory animals and their use for
 scientific purposes.
 Royal Society (Great Britain),Universities Federation for
 Animal Welfare London : The Society ; Potters Bar, Herts :
 UFAW,; 1987-9999. v. ; 21 cm.  Errata sheets inserted. 
 Bibliography: v. 1., p. 27-29.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Standards; Animal housing;
 Standards; Animal experimentation; Standards; Animal welfare
 
 
 231                                NAL Call. No.: Slide no.434
 Guinea pigs care and management..  Guinea pigs : care and
 management Ermeling, B. L.; Fish, R. E.
 University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational Resources, American College of Laboratory Animal
 Medicine, National Agricultural Library (U.S.)
 Seattle, WA : Produced and distributed by the Health Sciences
 Center for Educational Resources, University of Washington,;
 1992.
 62 slides : col. + 1 sound cassette (25 min.) + 1 guide.
 (Laboratory animal medicine and science. Series 2 ; V-9024). 
 Developed for the American College of Laboratory Animal
 Medicine.  Sound accompaniment compatible for manual and
 automatic operation.  Accompanying guide includes script. 
 Portions of this project have been funded by a grant from the
 National Agricultural Library.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Laboratory animals
 
 Abstract:  Covers environment, nutrition, housing, breeding,
 sanitation, identification, and disease recognition and
 prevention.
 
 
 232                                NAL Call. No.: Slide no.433
 Guinea pigs noninfectious diseases..  Guinea pigs :
 noninfectious diseases Terril, Lizabeth A.; Clemons, Donna J.;
 Wagner, Joseph E. University of Washington, Health Sciences
 Center for Educational Resources, American College of
 Laboratory Animal Medicine, National Agricultural Library
 (U.S.)
 Seattle, WA : Produced and distributed by the Health Sciences
 Center for Educational Resources, University of Washington,;
 1992.
 47 slides : col. + 1 sound cassette (26 min.) + 1 guide.
 (Laboratory animal medicine and science. Series 2 ; V-9026). 
 Developed for the American College of Laboratory Animal
 Medicine.  Sound accompaniment compatible for manual and
 automatic operation.  Accompanying guide includes script. 
 Portions of this project have been funded by a grant from the
 National Agruicultural Library.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Laboratory animals
 
 Abstract:  Covers recognition, significance, cause, diagnosis,
 treatment and control of common nutritional, metabolic,
 management-related, neoplastic, and other noninfectious
 diseases.
 
 
 233                                 NAL Call. No.: SF407.A45H3
 Haltung und Vermehrung von Amphibien in Labor und Terrarium 
 [Rearing and breeding amphibia in the laboratory and
 terrarium].
 Herrmann, Hans-Joachim
 Schleusingen : Naturhistoriches Museum,; 1988.
 64 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm. (Tagungsmaterial Amphibien). 
 Cover title. Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  German
 
 Descriptors: Amphibians as laboratory animals; Amphibians
 
 
 234                                 NAL Call. No.: Q180.57.H36
 Handbook of facilities planning..  Facilities planning
 Ruys, Theodorus,
 New York : Van Nostrand Reinhold, c1990-c1991; 1990-1991. 2 v.
 : ill. ; 26 cm.  Includes bibliographical references and
 index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Physical laboratories; Laboratory animals
 
 
 235                             NAL Call. No.: SF406.W64  1994
 Handbook of laboratory animal management and welfare.
 Wolfensohn, Sarah; Lloyd, Maggie
 Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press,; 1994.
 xi, 304 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references (p. [281]-293) and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare; Animal
 experimentation
 
 
 236                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Hazard reduction in animal research facilities.
 Richmond, J.Y.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1991 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 20 (2): p. 23-25, 28-29; 1991 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal experiments; Occupational hazards;
 Personnel
 
 
 237                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Heritabilities of clinical chemical traits in chimpanzees.
 Williams-Blangero, S.; Butler, T.; Brasky, K.; Murthy, K.K.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (2): p.
 141-143; 1994 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzees; Heritability; Blood chemistry;
 Traits; Genetic effects; Genetic variation
 
 Abstract:  Clinical chemical measures are commonly used
 biomarkers of health status in nonhuman primates and may also
 serve as important covariates or outcome variables in
 experimental protocols. There is a considerable range of
 normal variation in most clinical chemical traits and the
 determinants of this variation have been relatively unexplored
 in nonhuman primates used as animal models in biomedical
 research.This study assesses the evidence for genetic
 determinants of normal variation in nine clinical chemical
 traits (blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, potassium, sodium,
 CO2, glucose, albumin, globulin, and total cholesterol
 concentrations) in an important animal model, the chimpanzee.
 We found significant moderate heritabilities for potassium,
 sodium, albumin, globulin, and total cholesterol. The results
 provide information useful for addressing issues in both
 genetic management and experimental research.
 
 
 238                              NAL Call. No.: RB125.C68 1985
 Home-cage visual discrimination device for miniature swine.
 Sobotka, T.J.; Brown, R.H.
 New York : Plenum Press; 1986.
 Swine in biomedical research / edited by M.E. Tumbleson. p.
 89-94. ill; 1986. Proceedings of a conference on Swine in
 Biomedical Research, June 17-20, 1985, Columbia, Missouri. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Stress; Discrimination; Cages; Animal
 behavior
 
 
 239                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 The housing and handling of marmosets and tamarins infected
 with AIDS and other retroviruses.
 Francis, L.; Moore, R.T.; Raymond, R.T.; Baskerville, A.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 99-103. ill;
 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Animal housing; Handling; Immunological
 diseases; Retroviridae
 
 
 240                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The housing and maintenance of wild caught Uromastyx
 microlipes. Gardner, A.; Jones, P.; Harle, S.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 44 (1): p. 1-9; 1993 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Lizards; Laboratory rearing
 
 Abstract:  In this paper we have described the establishment
 and maintenance of a colony of 25 Uromastyx microlipes. Given
 good quality lizards, a nucleus of males and females will
 eventually be put aside to hopefully allow us to have a first
 captive breeding in the United Kingdom. The colony was
 established in May 1992 with the intention of keeping the
 lizards in good health for research purposes. To date 11
 lizards have been successfully used. Furthermore, we hope to
 improve our techniques of husbandry on this particular
 species.
 
 
 241                                NAL Call. No.: SF407.F39B56
 Housing and management.
 Fox, J.G.
 Philadelphia : Lea &amp; Febiger; 1988.
 Biology and diseases of the ferret / [edited by] James G. Fox.
 p. 153-158. ill; 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ferrets; Animal housing; Cages; Environment;
 Animal husbandry; Restraint of animals
 
 
 242                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The housing and management of nine adult bulls on a semen
 collection study. Ford, G.R.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 44 (1): p. 31-38; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Bulls; Laboratory rearing
 
 Abstract:  This paper describes a four month study undertaken
 during 1990, the aim of which was to determine the effects of
 a test substance on semen quality and viability, in Hereford
 bulls. It describes the measures taken to prepare for the
 housing and management of such potentially dangerous animals,
 in knowledge of the fact that animals of this type had not
 previously been handled at HRC.
 
 
 243                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Housing and welfare of laboratory rodents.
 Clough, G.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 239-244; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Animal housing; Laboratory rearing;
 Animal welfare; Ventilation; Relative humidity; Temperatures;
 Sounds; Cages
 
 
 244                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Housing, breeding and selecting chickens of the Obese strain
 (OS) with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis.
 Dietrich, H.M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (4): p. 345-352. ill; 1989 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Fowls; Thyroid diseases; Autoimmune diseases;
 Hereditary diseases; Disease models; Chicken housing; Animal
 breeding; Selection methods
 
 Abstract:  A management programme is described for a small
 colony of Obese strain (OS) chickens afflicted with
 spontaneous hereditary thyroiditis. Animals of this White
 Leghorn fine are used as an animal model for Hashimoto's
 thyroiditis of man to study possible mechanisms of
 autoimmunity in general and organ-specific autoimmune diseases
 in particular. Due to the severe mononuclear cell infiltration
 of the thyroid glands, OS chickens show symptoms of
 hypothyroidism, including small body size, subcutaneous and
 abdominal fat deposits, long silky feathers, small combs and
 wattles, cold sensitivity, low fertility and poor
 hatchability. Successful breeding of this line, especially in
 a small population, can therefore be done only if rigid
 precautions are taken in aspects of animal care. The selection
 of breeding stock, the principal requirements for adequate
 housing and food, the artificial insemination procedure, and
 recommendations for collecting and incubating chicken eggs are
 reported in detail. Precautions necessary during the
 incubation of fertilized eggs, and fertility and hatchability
 are reported. During the hatching period several specific
 features must be considered. The important role of staff
 involved in a small chicken breeding unit is emphasized.
 
 
 245                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Housing, care and psychological well being of captive and
 laboratory primates. Segal, Evalyn F.
 Park Ridge, N.J., U.S.A. : Noyes Publications,; 1989.
 xxxii, 544 p. : ill. ; 25 cm. (Noyes series in animal
 behavior, ecology, conservation, and management).  Includes
 index.  Bibliography: p. 421-476.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates as laboratory animals; Primates;
 Psychology; Primates; Housing; Animal welfare
 
 
 246                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Housing conditions and experimental results.
 Weihe, W.H.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 245-254; 1988. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Laboratory
 rearing; Animal experiments
 
 
 247                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.N48
 Housing, handling, and nutrition of salamanders.
 Jaeger, R.G.
 Bethesda, Md. : Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1992.
 SCAW newsletter v. 14 (3): p. 11-14; 1992.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Caudata; Animal housing; Animal husbandry; Animal
 nutrition; Life history
 
 
 248                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Housing, husbandry, and welfare of rodents: January 1979 -
 June 1993. Shull, C.L.
 Beltsville, Md., National Agricultural Library; 1993 Jul.
 Quick bibliography series - National Agricultural Library
 (93-52): 84 p.; 1993 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Animal welfare; Animal housing; Animal
 husbandry; Bibliographies
 
 
 249                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Housing, production and life-maintenance of the Non-Obese
 Diabetic (NOD) mouse.
 Mansfield, K.J.; Beales, P.E.; Williams, A.J.K.; Lampeter,
 E.F.; Pozzilli, P. Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (1): p. 29-37; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Laboratory rearing; Strains
 
 Abstract:  In this paper we outline the history, maintenance,
 production and characteristics of a colony of Non-Obese
 Diabetic (NOD) mice which has been established at The Medical
 College of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London. This strain of
 mice spontaneously develops a form of insulin dependent
 diabetes which closely resembles that found in humans. The
 problems of maintaining a colony in which this disease occurs
 are discussed.
 
 
 250                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Housing rabbits the unconventional way.
 Heath, M.; Stott, E.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Apr01.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (1): p. 13-25. ill; 1990 Apr01.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Rabbit housing; Floor pens; Animal
 welfare
 
 
 251                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9W44
 How the proposed regulations might impact a research facility.
 Butler, T.M.
 Bethesda, MD Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1990 Jan.
 Well-being of nonhuman primates in research / edited by Joy A.
 Mench and Lee Krulisch. p. 55-59. ill; 1990 Jan.  Paper
 presented at a conference held by the Scientists Center for
 Animal Welfare, June 23, 1989, Bethesda, Md.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Texas; Animal welfare; Laboratory animals;
 Legislation; Impact
 
 
 252                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 How to briefly examine common laboratory animals.
 Silverman, J.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1988 May.
 Lab animal v. 17 (4): p. 38-39; 1988 May.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Cat; Rabbits; Rats; Mice; Primates;
 Facilities; Animal health; Veterinary services
 
 
 253                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 How to increase employee participation in the lab animal
 environment. Hayden, C.C.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1987 Sep.
 Lab animal v. 16 (6): p. 47, 49; 1987 Sep.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Participative
 management
 
 
 254                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Husbandry, breeding and maintenance of a viable population of
 cotton top tamarins (Sanguinus oedipus oedipus).
 Scullion, F.T.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1987 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 38 (3): p. 167-174; 1987 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Callithricidae; Animal husbandry; Animal
 breeding; Animal housing; Animal feeding; Handling; Animal
 welfare; Disease prevention; Endangered species
 
 Abstract:  Members of the family Callithricidae are commonly
 used as laboratory primates and some species have been vital
 in certain areas of medical research. Constant erosion of the
 South American tropical rain forests, caused by logging for
 commercial and agricultural uses, has placed a number of
 species in danger of extinction in their natural habitat.
 Laboratory bred animals are helping to ease the pressure on
 natural populations whilst increasing the knowledge about
 particular species of tamarin as kept in the University of
 Bristol colony.
 
 
 255                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Husbandry procedures and health problems associated with a
 long-term mouse study.
 Robbins, L. \u National Radiological Protection Board,
 Chilton, Didcot; Ellender, M.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technicians v. 44 (3): p. 247-255; 1993 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal husbandry; Long term experiments;
 Plutonium; Americium; Uranium; Radionuclides; Toxicity;
 Sarcoma; Leukemia
 
 Abstract:  In most breeding colonies mice are usually
 sacrificed at approximately 8 months of age. In the majority
 of experimental studies on the biokinetics of radionuclides,
 mice are killed before they are 18 months of age. For this
 toxicity study comparing the effects of incorporated
 radionuclides it was important that the CBA/H strain mice were
 kept for their full lifespan of approximately three years.
 Treatment, age and strain related problems are reported here.
 
 
 256                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.U5 1987
 Hygiene in the animal house., 6th ed.
 Eaton, P.
 London : Longman; 1987.
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of laboratory
 animals / edited by Trevor B. Poole; editorial assistant, Ruth
 Robinson. p. 144-158; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing;
 Decontamination; Cleaning; Disinfection; Sterilizing; Barriers
 
 
 257                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Hypoglycemia of squirrel monkey neonates: implications for
 infant survival. Brady, A.G.; Williams, L.E.; Abee, C.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 May. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (3): p.
 262-265; 1990 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Saimiri; Hypoglycemia; Blood sugar; Normal
 values; Survival; Neonatal mortality; Age differences; Newborn
 animals; Hemoglobin
 
 Abstract:  Neonatal deaths are a serious problem in breeding
 colonies of squirrel monkeys. Seriously ill neonates in our
 colony are always hypoglycemic on presentation. To determine
 normal glucose values for squirrel monkey infants of various
 ages, serum glucose determinations were done at 1, 3, 7, 10,
 14 days and 1 month of age using a standard laboratory test
 for serum glucose. Glucose concentration increased from a low
 of 49 +/- 3 mg/dl (Mean +/- SEM) at 1 day (n = 21) to 109 +/-
 4 mg/dl at 1 month of age (n = 17). Glucose values for 1, 3
 and 7 day-old infants were significantly lower than 1 month-
 old infants (P < .05) To provide a time-averaged indication of
 blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) measurements were
 made at 1 day, 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, 1 year of
 age and in adults (> 3 years of age). GHb values ranged from
 2.6% +/- 0.1 for 1 day old infants (n = 13) to 4.0 +/- 0.2 for
 adults (n = 10) with a steady increase during the first 2
 months of life. Animals 1 year of age and younger had
 significantly lower glycosylated hemoglobin than adults. These
 studies indicate that blood glucose concentration is
 significantly lower in squirrel monkey neonates than in older
 infants, juveniles and adults. Maternal rejection, trauma, and
 associated problems occur commonly in socially reared squirrel
 monkeys. The marginal hypoglycemic state of these infants
 places them at high risk for clinical hypoglycemia as a sequel
 to such perturbations.
 
 
 258                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Identification, capture, and biotelemetry of socially living
 monkeys. Rasmussen, K.L.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (4): p.
 350-354; 1991 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Animal housing; Groups; Identification;
 Capture of animals; Telemetry; Monitoring; Physiological
 functions
 
 Abstract:  Remote monitoring of physiologic function using
 socially living monkeys differs from that using individually
 housed animals in that access to subjects may be limited. Some
 logistic aspects of working with socially housed monkeys are
 reviewed, including identification of individuals and
 capturing subjects. Methods of remote sampling include
 hormonal assays of urine and fecal samples, measurement of
 physical indices as estimates of reproductive status, and the
 use of telemetry devices to record activity and biopotentials.
 Key factors in the selection of a telemetry system are
 discussed. In many cases, remote monitoring may permit
 assessment of physiologic function without the stress of
 handling or restraint.
 
 
 259                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Immunogenetic aspects of a canine breeding colony.
 Ladiges, W.C.; Deeg, H.J.; Raff, R.F.; Storb, R.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (1): p.
 58-62. ill; 1985 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Animal breeding; Immunogenetics; Phenotypes
 
 
 260                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 The impact of the GLPs on lab animal research.
 Soave, O.; Tufts, N.R.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 Mar.
 Lab animal v. 15 (2): p. 39, 41, 43, 45; 1986 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Regulations; Research policy;
 Facilities; Records
 
 
 261                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The importance of and difficulties encountered with diagnosis
 of disease in laboratory animals.
 Whittaker, D.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (1): p. 23-29; 1989 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal diseases; Diagnosis;
 Handling; Postmortem examinations
 
 Abstract:  Despite major advances in breeding and maintaining
 laboratory animals, disease problems continue to interfere
 with research projects. Many of these diseases are of a sub-
 clinical nature and their effects are only observed at post-
 mortem or even only under histopathological evaluation. Other
 diseases are more dramatic in their effect to the extent that
 it may be necessary to terminate an experiment due to the
 morbidity, clinical effects or even mortality. Even veterinary
 diagnostic protocols, techniques and procedures are often
 missing from laboratory animal units. Thought should be given
 to establishing standard operating procedures for handling
 animals and post-mortem material suspected of being diseased.
 
 
 262                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Improved cage design for single housing of social nonhuman
 primates. Bielitzki, J.; Susor, T.G.; Elias, K.; Bowden, D.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jul. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (4): p.
 428-431; 1990 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Cages; Design; Animal welfare
 
 
 263                                  NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 Improved housing of mice, rats and guinea-pigs: a contribution
 to the refinement of animal experiments.
 Scharmann, W.
 Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical
 Experiments; 1991 Feb.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 19 (1): p.
 108-114; 1991 Feb. Paper presented at the fifth meeting of the
 Italian Group for the Application of Tissue Cultures in
 Toxiciology, May 31-June 1, 1990, Milan, Italy. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Cages; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  The keeping of experimental animals requires
 housing systems appropriate to the needs and behaviour of each
 species, as demanded by various supranational and national
 guidelines. It is questionable whether conventional housing
 systems for rodents such as mice, rats and guinea-pigs meet
 this demand. It is suggested that the housing of laboratory
 rodents should be improved by the use of larger and more
 appropriate cage types, as well as by reducing the monotony of
 conventional housing systems.
 
 
 264                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 Improving the housing and care of laboratory pigeons and rats.
 Schmorrow, D.D.; Ulrich, R.E.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals; 1991.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 5: p. 299-305; 1991. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigeons; Rats; Cages; Space requirements; Animal
 husbandry; Animal health; Animal welfare
 
 
 265                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Improving the micro environment of caged laboratory macaques.
 Reinhardt, V.; Zweifel, D.; Pape, D.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (3): p. 179-183; 1992 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca; Microenvironments; Cages
 
 
 266                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Inapparent Streptococcus pneumoniae type 35 infections in
 commercial rats and mice.
 Fallon, M.T.; Reinhard, M.K.; Gray, B.M.; Davis, T.W.;
 Lindsey, J.R. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1988 Apr. Laboratory animal science
 v. 38 (2): p. 129-132; 1988 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Rats; Mice; Respiratory diseases;
 Streptococcus pneumoniae; Symptoms; Isolation
 
 Abstract:  Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from
 specific-pathogen-free rodents in two rooms at a commercial
 breeding facility during vendor surveillance testing. In a
 survey of 274 animals from the two rooms over a period of 7
 months, capsular serotype 35 S. pneumoniae was isolated from
 the upper respiratory tracts of 11% (9 of 82) of C57BL/6 mice
 in room A and 14% (10 of 72) of F344 rats in room B, but not
 from WKY rats, BALB/c mice or DBA/2 mice from room A. In both
 C57BL/6 mice and F344 rats, older rodents had higher
 colonization frequencies. Nasal lavage cultures gave the best
 results in identifying colonized rodents. No clinical illness
 or microscopic lesions were associated with pneumococcal
 colonization in rats or mice, and no other evidence of
 potential pathogen infection was found except for positive
 serologic tests for mouse rotavirus in mice. This is the first
 report of natural pneumococcal infection in mice, and the
 first report of type 35 S. pneumoniae infection in rodents.
 The findings support an earlier observation that pneumococcal
 infections in rat colonies tend to be monotypic and suggest
 that the same may be true in mice.
 
 
 267                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 The incidence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in a commercial
 barrier-maintained rabbit breeding colony.
 Greenstein, G.; Drozdowicz, C.K.; Garcia, F.G.; Lewis, L.L.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1991 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 25 (4): p. 287-290; 1991 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Encephalitozoon cuniculi; Incidence;
 Serological surveys; Colonies
 
 Abstract:  Between 1982 and 1987 sera from 495 Zealand White
 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) obtained from a single
 commercial supplier were tested for the presence of antibodies
 to Encephalitozoon cuniculi. A commercially available carbon
 immunoassay test kit was used. Initially 32.9% of the rabbits
 were seropositive with the number progressively decreasing to
 2.3% by 1987. The reason for the significant decline in the
 incidence of infection was most likely due to a selection
 process for breeding stock instituted by the supplier based
 upon productivity, posture and weight of each animal.
 
 
 268                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 An inexpensive, climate-controlled enclosure for gibbons
 utilizing appropriate technology.
 Dahl, J.F.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 323-335.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pongidae; Climate control; Environmental control;
 Animal housing; Design; Facilities
 
 
 269                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Inexpensive outdoor enclosure for Japanese macaques used in
 biobehavioral research.
 Crowley, T.J.; Goebel, A.; Nesbitt, T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 Sep. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (5): p.
 420-424. ill; 1989 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca; Animal housing; Facilities; Animal
 research; Animal behavior
 
 Abstract:  For studies of alcohol self-administration in a
 monkey social group, we effectively and humanely enclosed nine
 Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in an ellipse 32 X 40m,
 with a 1 m high chain-link fence surmounted by a 3 m curtain
 of electrically conductive nylon net. High-voltage brief-pulse
 charges prevent climbing on the net. Materials for this fence
 cost less than $14.50 per running meter. Weeds and grass grew
 freely within the ellipse, and seven dead trees interconnected
 with ropes permitted climbing and swinging. An open, roofed
 gazebo provided sun and rain shelter, and its single wall
 blocked the prevailing wind. Mouth activated drinkometer
 spouts in the corral supplied solutions for voluntary alcohol
 self-administration. Automatic counters informed an observer
 of exact doses consumed by each subject. Another observer
 recorded the frequency of occurrence of various social
 behaviors. A small kennel run, roofed over with chain-link
 fencing, connected the corral with a paddock-like, partially
 heated building, to and from which the monkeys usually had
 free access. It contained three interconnected chain-link
 pens. A raceway opening from the pens incoporated a squeeze
 cage used for weighing animals, drawing blood samples, or
 administering medications. This unique facility promotes the
 psychological well-being of research primates, which is being
 mandated by federal law.
 
 
 270                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Infection of rabbits with Sendai virus.
 Machii, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Iwai, H.; Ueda, K.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (4): p.
 334-337; 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan; Rabbits; Murine paramyxovirus;
 Infectivity; Antibody titer; Disease transmission
 
 Abstract:  Rabbits were either inoculated with Sendai virus
 (SV), strain MN, or caged with virus-inoculated rabbits on the
 same day of the viral inoculation, and examined for viral
 shedding and detection of viral antigens in the respiratory
 tract, histopathologic changes, and serum antibodies.
 Infectious virus was recovered from nasal swabs at
 postinoculation day (PID) 3 and disappeared by PID 10. Viral
 antigens were detected by immunofluorescence in epithelial
 cells of the nasal cavities, but not of the trachea and lungs
 from PID 3 to PID 10, and antibodies were detected after PID
 7. Rabbits had no clinical manifestations and only exhibited a
 moderate increase in goblet cells of the nasal epithelium. In
 the transmission study, virus was recovered from one of three
 uninoculated rabbits at postexposure day (PED) 10 and
 antibodies were detected at PED 15 in the same rabbit. These
 data suggest that, although viral multiplication was limited
 to the nasal epithelium, laboratory rabbits are susceptible to
 Sendai virus infection.
 
 
 271                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Infection of SDAV-immune rats with SDAV and rat coronavirus.
 Weir, E.C.; Jacoby, R.O.; Paturzo, F.X.; Johnson, E.A.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jul. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (4): p.
 363-366; 1990 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Sialodacryoadenitis virus; Coronavirus;
 Immunity; Reinfection; Disease transmission; Disease course
 
 Abstract:  Infection of rats with sialodacryoadenitis virus
 (SDAV) or rat coronavirus (RCV) is acute and self-limiting,
 and elimination and control of either virus is based on the
 assumption that recovered rats are immune to reinfection. To
 test this hypothesis, we examined whether SDAV-immune rats
 could be infected with RCV or reinfected with SDAV. Sprague
 Dawley (SD) rats were inoculated intranasally with SDAV or
 with culture medium alone and serial SDAV antibody titers were
 obtained. Eleven months after inoculation, when antibody
 titers had stabilized, SDAV-immune and nonimmune rats were
 challenged with SDAV or RCV, and euthanatized 3 or 6 days
 later. SDAV-immune rats challenged with SDAV or RCV manifested
 acute rhinitis associated with virus antigen by 3 days after
 inoculation, but no lesions or antigen were subsequently found
 in the lower respiratory tract, salivary glands or lacrimal
 glands. There was also a marked anamnestic increase in
 antibody titer by 6 days after challenge. SDAV-immune rats
 challenged with SDAV or RCV also transmitted infection to
 nonimmune cage mates. This study indicates that 11 months
 after primary, infection with SDAV, rats can be infected with
 SDAV or RCV, but that the severity of disease is significantly
 reduced.
 
 
 272                                   NAL Call. No.: 41.8 AM3A
 Influence of cage size on heart rate and behavior in rhesus
 monkeys. Line, S.W.; Morgan, K.N.; Markowitz, H.; Strong, S.
 Schaumburg, Ill. : American Veterinary Medical Association;
 1989 Sep. American journal of veterinary research v. 50 (9):
 p. 1523-1526; 1989 Sep. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Cage size; Heart rate; Animal
 behavior; Vocalization; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  We studied 6 singly caged adult female rhesus
 monkeys to determine whether increased cage size had any
 effect on behavior or heart rate. Two monkeys at a time were
 placed in cages 40% larger than their standard cage for 1 week
 on 2 occasions, using a counter-balanced design. Direct
 behavioral observations were performed 75 minutes/week on each
 monkey. Heart rate and general activity were monitored 35
 hours/week by a telemetry system. Statistically significant
 differences were not found in aggressive, submissive,
 abnormal, or self-abusive behavior, nor in time spent in the
 front half of the cage, duration of grooming, looking at the
 observer, or stereotyped or nonstereotyped locomotion.
 Vocalizations increased the first time in the larger cage, but
 not the second, and decreased upon the second return to the
 standard cage. Differences with respect to cage size were not
 found in heart rate or activity level, although there were
 significant variations at different times of day. We conclude
 that modest increases in cage size are unlikely to enrich the
 environment of singly caged laboratory primates.
 
 
 273                                    NAL Call. No.: QL750.A6
 Influence of housing conditions on beagle behaviour.
 Hetts, S.; Clark, J.D.; Calpin, J.P.; Arnold, C.E.; Mateo,
 J.M. Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.; 1992 Jul.
 Applied animal behaviour science v. 34 (1/2): p. 137-155; 1992
 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Pens; Cages; Animal housing; Animal
 behavior; Social interaction; Isolation; Space requirements;
 Animal welfare
 
 
 274                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Influence of photoperiod, isolation and escape option on
 weight gain of golden hamsters.
 Hoffman, R.A.; Habeeb, P.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1988 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 39 (2): p. 93-98; 1988 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Golden hamster; Photoperiod; Isolation; Weight
 gain; Animal housing; Animal burrows
 
 
 275                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Infrequent shedding and transmission of Herpesvirus simiae
 from seropositive macaques.
 Weir, E.C.; Bhatt, P.N.; Jacoby, R.O.; Hilliard, J.K.;
 Morgenstern, S. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1993 Dec. Laboratory animal science
 v. 43 (6): p. 541-544; 1993 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Macaca fascicularis;
 Herpesviridae; Epizootiology; Disease transmission;
 Environmental factors; Quarantine; Animal breeding; Caesarean
 section; Parturition; Stress
 
 Abstract:  The epizootiologic properties of Herpesvirus simiae
 (B virus) were studied in singly housed macaques (Macaca
 mulatta and M. fascicularis) in a biomedical vivarium to
 determine whether commonly encountered environments and
 procedures such as quarantine, breeding, Caesarean section,
 parturition, and social stress induced virus shedding and
 transmission. Macaques were tested serologically and for
 infectious virus. Oral, conjunctival, and vaginal swab samples
 were obtained repeatedly. Virus excretion was not detected
 during a 7-week quarantine of 32 newly acquired, singly housed
 animals tested every other week for 6 weeks, and none of 19
 seronegative animals from this group seroconverted during 7
 weeks in quarantine. No virus shedding was detected in 16
 seropositive animals tested weekly for 3 weeks after Caesarean
 section or normal parturition or in 11 seropositive animals
 following introduction of new males to animal rooms. One
 animal seroconverted after repeated breeding of seropositive
 animals to seronegative partners. Fifty-three singly housed
 offspring remained seronegative for up to 10 years, even if
 born to seropositive dams, and only 1 of 86 singly housed
 animals less than 7 years old was seropositive. These results
 suggest that shedding of B virus from seropositive macaques is
 uncommon, when subjected to common laboratory procedures or
 environments, and that transmission is rare in singly housed
 animals. These results may be useful in establishing B virus-
 free colonies of macaques.
 
 
 276                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 An innovative technical approach for repetitive intratracheal
 instillation without anesthesia in small animals.
 Blouin, A.; Kingma, I.; Boutet, M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (3): p.
 274-279; 1994 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Golden hamsters; Drug delivery systems; Trachea
 
 Abstract:  Intratracheal instillation in small laboratory
 animals often involves repeated anesthesia and upper airway
 intubation. To facilitate this approach, we developed an
 indwelling system for repeated intratracheal administrations
 that was assembled from widely available simple components.
 Its installation can be considered a minor surgical procedure
 and is done under sterile surgical conditions. This system
 allows repeated intratracheal administration of substances in
 the lungs in unanesthetized animals, with the possibility to
 increase the frequency of instillations and lower the dose.
 Thoracic radiography was performed to document the reliability
 of this permanent instillation system. Furthermore, a potent
 toxic nitrosamine (NNK; N-nitrosamine 4-
 [nitrosomethylamino]-1-[3-pyridil]-1-butanone) was used to
 demonstrate appreciable pulmonary toxicity at low dosage but
 with repetitive administration. This simple technique brings a
 significant simplification and improvement to small animal
 studies that require repeated bronchoalveolar administration
 of substances.
 
 
 277                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Interspecific contrasts in response of macaques to transport
 cage training. Clarke, A.S.; Mason, W.A.; Moberg, G.P.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (3): p.
 305-309; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca; Transport of animals; Cages; Training
 (animal); Animal behavior; Adrenal cortex hormones
 
 Abstract:  Corticosteroid values in response to brief
 confinement in a transport cage were compared between rhesus,
 bonnet, and crabeating macaques before and after they were
 trained to enter the cage. Behavioral data were collected to
 assess performance during training. Species differences were
 found both in training measures and in corticosteroid response
 to confinement in the transport cage after training. Bonnets
 took longer to train than rhesus or crabeaters. Rhesus showed
 the smallest adrenocortical response to cage confinement after
 training and crabeaters the greatest, suggesting that this
 group habituated more slowly to confinement than the other two
 groups. The results have implications for choice of
 experimental subject species and for management and husbandry
 of laboratory primates.
 
 
 278                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Introduction of Salmonellae into a centralized laboratory
 animal facility by infected day old chicks.
 Nicklas, W.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (2): p. 161-163; 1987 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chicks; Animal husbandry; Laboratory animals;
 Facilities; Salmonella; Salmonellosis
 
 
 279                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.S5 1986
 An introduction to bedding materials., [Rev. 1986].
 Bethesda, Md.? : Uniformed Services University of the Health
 Sciences?, 1986? :.; 1986.
 The use of animals in research / compiled by Richard C.
 Simmonds. p. 66-79; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Facilities;
 Floors; Litter; Wood shavings; Quality controls
 
 
 280                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.S5 1986
 An introduction to housing, identification, and husbandry
 techniques for rodents., [Rev. 1986].
 Bethesda, Md.? : Uniformed Services University of the Health
 Sciences?, 1986? :.; 1986.
 The use of animals in research / compiled by Richard C.
 Simmonds. p. 80-102. ill; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Animal housing; Identification; Animal
 husbandry; Cages; Boxes; Feed dispensers; Environment; Animal
 health
 
 
 281                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.S5 1986
 An introduction to laboratory animal caging., [Rev. 1986].
 Bethesda, Md.? : Uniformed Services University of the Health
 Sciences?, 1986? :.; 1986.
 The use of animals in research / compiled by Richard C.
 Simmonds. p. 53-65; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Cages; Boxes;
 Plastics; Metals
 
 
 282                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.S5 1986
 An introduction to procurement and obtaining sources for
 laboratory animals., [Rev. 1986].
 Bethesda, Md.? : Uniformed Services University of the Health
 Sciences?, 1986? :.; 1986.
 The use of animals in research / compiled by Richard C.
 Simmonds. p. 44-48; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Supplies; Facilities;
 Management
 
 
 283                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.S5 1986
 An introduction to the domestic cat., [Rev. 1986].
 Bethesda, Md.? : Uniformed Services University of the Health
 Sciences?, 1986? :.; 1986.
 The use of animals in research / compiled by Richard C.
 Simmonds. p. 189-194; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cat; Animal husbandry; Animal anatomy;
 Physiology; Restraint; Handling; Animal breeding; Animal
 experiments
 
 
 284                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.S5 1986
 An introduction to the rabbit., [Rev. 1986].
 Bethesda, Md.? : Uniformed Services University of the Health
 Sciences?, 1986? :.; 1986.
 The use of animals in research / compiled by Richard C.
 Simmonds. p. 173-188; 1986.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Animal husbandry; Handling; Animal
 housing; Cages; Identification; Rabbit feeding; Euthanasia;
 Animal health
 
 
 285                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Investigating genetic variability between the MHS hypertensive
 strain of rats and its normotensive control, MNS.
 Barber, B.R.; Torielli, L.; Ferrandi, M.; Ferrari, P.;
 Salardi, S.; Parenti, P.; Duzzi, L.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 191-196; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Strains; Genetic variation; Hypertension;
 Breeding programs
 
 
 286                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Investigators' interrelationship with laboratory animals.
 Bustad, L.K.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (special
 issue): p. 167-170; 1987 Jan.  In the series analytic:
 Effective animal care and use committees / edited by F.B.
 Orlans, R.C. Simmonds, W.J. Dodds.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare; Animal
 housing; Animal nutrition; Animal experiments; Animal health;
 Handling
 
 
 287                                 NAL Call. No.: SF407.P7I67
 IPS international guidelines for the acquisition, care and
 breeding of nonhuman primates..  International guidelines for
 the acquisition, care and breeding of nonhuman primates
 Else, James G.
 International Primatological Society, Captive Care Committee,
 Institute of Primate Research (Kenya)
 Kenya : Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of
 Kenya,; 1988. 27 p. ; 24 cm. (Primate report ; 25).  October
 1989.  Includes bibliographical references (p. 18).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Amimal welfare
 
 
 288                            NAL Call. No.: SF407.P7T49 1991
 Is social housing of primates always the optimal choice?., 1st
 ed.;. Coe, C.L.
 Washington, DC : American Psychological Association ;; 1991.
 Through the looking glass: issues of psychological well-being
 in captive nonhuman primates / edited by Melinda A. Novak and
 Andrew J. Petto. p. 78-92; 1991.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal housing; Social environment;
 Animal welfare
 
 
 289                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Isolation cubicles: space and cost analysis.
 Ruys, T.
 New York : Nature Publishing Company; 1988 Aug.
 Lab animal v. 17 (5): p. 25-30. ill; 1988 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Animal housing;
 Isolation; Space requirements; Cost analysis
 
 
 290                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Isolation-induced renal functional changes in rats from four
 breeders. Vadiei, K.; Berens, K.L.; Luke, D.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (1): p.
 56-59; 1990 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Strains; Strain differences; Renal
 function; Isolation
 
 Abstract:  The investigation of drug-induced nephrotoxicity
 depends on the adequate estimation of renal function at
 baseline and upon completion of the study. Typically, this
 procedure requires housing of the animal in an individual
 wire-bottom metabolic cage to facilitate complete urine
 collection. The present study compared the effects of 4
 consecutive days of isolation on Sprague-Dawley rats from four
 breeders: Harlan Sprague-Dawley, Charles River Laboratories,
 BioLab and TIMCO Breeders. Following 4 days of isolation,
 weight loss was not significantly different between groups.
 However, urine flow rate declined significantly (p < 0.0005)
 in TIMCO and Charles River breeder rat groups during the study
 period compared to baseline values and other groups. Serum
 creatinine levels were 63% greater (p < 0.01) with a 40%
 decline in creatinine clearance (p < 0.0001) after 4 days of
 isolation in TIMCO rats. Although a 59% decrease in baseline
 creatinine clearance was found in Charles River rats after 96
 hours of isolation (p < 0.0005), the mean baseline value was
 38% greater than other rat groups (p = 0.04). Fractional
 reabsorption of sodium was 4.4% less (p < 0.001) in TIMCO rats
 compared to baseline. Fractional excretion of potassium was
 highly variable in all rat groups. We conclude that animal
 isolation was associated with a significant change in renal
 function in TIMCO rats which was not observed in others.
 Caution is required to consider the source of the rat, and
 also duration of isolation, in studies requiring the passive
 assessment of renal function.
 
 
 291                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Ivermectin eradication of pinworms from rats kept in
 ventilated cages. Huerkamp, M.J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (1): p.
 86-90; 1993 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Ivermectin; Syphacia
 
 Abstract:  Studies using rats that were naturally infested
 with Syphacia muris and kept in forced-air, individually
 ventilated cages showed that ivermectin given orally at a dose
 of 2 mg/kg for three treatments at 7- or 9-day intervals was
 eradicative. Paired ivermectin treatments given at 7- or 9-day
 intervals were ineffective in eliminating parasitism. Pinworm
 eggs persisted on the perianal region of rats for up to 17
 days and eggs were also present in soiled contact bedding
 within cages and on surfaces within the animal room. Anal
 tapes as a diagnostic test had 88% sensitivity in detecting
 pinworms.
 
 
 292                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Kong toys for laboratory primates: are they really an
 enrichment or just fomites?.
 Bayne, K.A.L.; Dexter, S.L.; Hurst, J.K.; Strange, G.M.; Hill,
 E.E. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory
 Animal Science; 1993 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (1):
 p. 78-85; 1993 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Toys
 
 Abstract:  Simple toys as enrichment devices have been
 associated with a rapid decline in their use by nonhuman
 primates. Other facets of toy presentation have not been
 described previously. For example, a comparison of the
 effect(s) of an enrichment device between two facilities
 should be validated if enrichment recommendations are to be
 made that affect diverse research facilities across the
 country. Additionally, a comparison of two methods of
 presentation (one highly accessible to the animal and the
 other less accessible) of the same enrichment device for
 potential differences in efficacy could provide direction in
 implementing an enrichment program based on simple toys. The
 handling of enrichment devices by nonhuman primates can lead
 to the spread of microbial contamination. The typical
 enrichment program rotates enrichment devices among animals to
 maximize the variety of stimuli available to each primate in
 the most economic manner. An adequate sanitation program is
 therefore pivotal to minimizing the potential for enrichment
 devices to be fomites. We conducted three experiments that
 addressed these issues. The results confirmed that, although
 the presence of a simple toy reduced behavioral pathology,
 there was variability in behavioral effect for an enrichment
 technique between facilities. Two methods of presentation (on
 floor and suspended) of a simple toy did not produce any
 significant differences in use. Finally, we demonstrated that
 microbial growth can persist on enrichment devices after they
 have been sanitized in a commercial cagewasher.
 
 
 293                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The Laboratory Animal Breeders' Association Accreditation
 Scheme for commericially bred laboratory animals within the
 United Kingdom. Bantin, G.C.; Smith, M.W.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1985 May.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 36 (1): p. 1-6; 1985 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Laboratory animals; Breeders'
 associations; Accreditation; Animal breeding
 
 
 294                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Laboratory animal facilities and management: January 1985-July
 1992. Berry, D.J.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1992 Aug.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculture,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (92-58): 94 p.; 1992
 Aug.  Updates QB 91-43. Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Laboratories; Cages; Animal
 experiments; Bibliographies
 
 
 295                                    NAL Call. No.: SF77.A22
 Laboratory animal facilities fully accredited by the American
 Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care as of
 April 1, 1986. New Lenox, Ill. : The Association; 1986 Apr.
 AAALAC activities report - American Association for
 Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care v. 14: p. 8-15; 1986
 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Facilities;
 Accreditation; Directories
 
 
 296                             NAL Call. No.: NA6751.Y64 1992
 Laboratory animal facility planning and design.
 Yokel, Uri
 AEPA Architects Engineers, P.C.
 Washington, D.C. : AEPA Architects Engineers, P.C., 1992?;
 1992. 28 leaves : ill. ; 28 cm.  Caption title.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Architecture; Laboratory animals
 
 
 297                                    NAL Call. No.: 410 IN84
 Laboratory animal management in Malaysia.
 Baskaran, G.
 Oslo, Norway : The International Council for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988. ICLAS bulletin (62): p. 26-28; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Malaysia; Laboratory animals; Animal husbandry;
 Facilities
 
 
 298                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Laboratory animal science in Czechoslovakia.
 Klir, P.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 35-40; 1988.
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Czechoslovakia; Laboratory animals; Animal
 husbandry; Animal breeding; Animal experiments; Germ free
 husbandry
 
 
 299                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Laboratory care and breeding of the African clawed frog.
 Dawson, D.; Schultz, T.W.; Shroeder, E.C.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 21 (4): p. 31-36; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Xenopus laevis; Animal husbandry; Animal breeding
 
 
 300                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Laboratory management and husbandry of the Japanese medaka.
 Grady, A.W.; Greer, I.E.; McLaughlin, R.M.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1991 Mar.
 Lab animal v. 20 (3): p. 22-28; 1991 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Freshwater fishes; Laboratory rearing
 
 
 301                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Laboratory management of the ferret for biomedical research.
 Moody, K.D.; Bowman, T.A.; Lang, C.M.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (3): p.
 272-279. ill; 1985 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ferrets; Laboratory rearing; Animal breeding;
 Animal housing; Animal nutrition; Zoonoses; Medical research
 
 
 302                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Laboratory swine--principles of husbandry and research
 techniques. Dopson, D.C. \u Brompton Hospital, London
 Sussex : The Institute; 1993 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technicians v. 44 (3): p. 175-200; 1993 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Laboratory animals; Animal husbandry; Pig
 housing; Handling; Anesthesia; Miniature pigs; Strain
 differences; Veterinary medicine; Animal models
 
 Abstract:  Pigs are anatomically and physiologically similar
 to man in many ways. A fact which is supported by many and
 diverse scientific studies. However, they may be overlooked as
 research models for reasons of the presumed difficulties to be
 encountered in maintaining and handling animals of potentially
 great size. In fact, the type of pig available in the United
 Kingdom ranges from the Large White or Yorkshire pig which may
 weigh > 200 kg to the Yucatan Miniature Pig which is
 considerably smaller and lighter at < 70 kg. There are a
 number of possible advantages to using pigs over other species
 in the laboratory and some selected points will be considered
 in this paper. The requirements for routine care and
 techniques for minor regulated procedures are also described.
 Emphasis is also placed on current perspectives in cardio-
 respiratory research for which the pig is a particularly
 suitable animal model.
 
 
 303                              NAL Call. No.: RB125.C68 1985
 Labortory methodology and management of swine in biomedical
 research. Panepinto, L.M.
 New York : Plenum Press; 1986.
 Swine in biomedical research / edited by M.E. Tumbleson. p.
 97-109. ill; 1986.  Proceedings of a conference on Swine in
 Biomedical Research, June 17-20, 1985, Columbia, Missouri. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Medical research; Laboratory methods;
 Animal husbandry; Restraint of animals; Animal nutrition; Pig
 housing; Animal welfare
 
 
 304                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.L353
 LAMA lines newsletter of the Laboratory Animal Management
 Association. Laboratory Animal Management Association
 Silver Spring, MD : The Association,; 1986-9999.
 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 7
 (Sept./Oct. 1987); title from caption.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals
 
 
 305                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.L35
 The LAMA review journal of the Laboratory Animal Management
 Association. Laboratory Animal Management Association
 Silver Spring, Md. : The Association,; 1989-9999.
 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3
 (summer 1989); title from cover.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Management; Periodicals
 
 
 306                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Langur monkeys (Presbytis entellus) in captivity.
 Taff, M.A.; Dolhinow, P.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 291-304.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cercopithecidae; Laboratory animals; Animal
 behavior; Group behavior; Space requirements; Diets; Cages;
 Careproviders
 
 
 307                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Legislation policy attitudes: impacting ARF management.
 Black, H.S.; Doepel, F.M.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1985 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 14 (3): p. 40-43. ill; 1985 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Europe; Laboratory animals; Animal welfare;
 Legislation; History
 
 
 308                                  NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 The licensing and control of animal experimentation in Norway.
 Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical
 Experiments; 1988 Mar.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 15 (3): p. 260;
 1988 Mar. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Norway; Laboratory animals; Animal experiments;
 Facilities; Inspection; Regulations; Licensing; Animal welfare
 
 
 309                                   NAL Call. No.: HV4735.W7
 Local animal control management.
 Wright, Phyllis; Cassidy, Barbara A.; Finney, Martha
 Management Information Service
 Washington, D.C. : Management Information Service,
 International City Management Association,; 1986.
 20 p. : ill. ; 28 cm. (MIS report ; v. 18, no. 7 (July 1986)). 
 Cover title. Bibliography: p. 16.
 
 Language:  English; English
 
 Descriptors: Animals; Control; Municipal services; Animals and
 civilization; Human-animal relationships; Pounds; Animal
 welfare
 
 
 310                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Long term animal studies.
 Bennett, C.L.; Davis, R.T.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 213-234;
 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Animal housing; Laboratory rearing;
 Aging; Models; Groups; Longevity; Social behavior
 
 
 311                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Long-term data on the reproduction and maintenance of a colony
 of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus jacchus) 1972-1983.
 Box, H.O.; Hubrecht, R.C.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (3): p. 249-260; 1987 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Animal housing; Diets; Reproduction;
 Sex ratio; Mortality; Data analysis
 
 
 312                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Lymphoblastic lymphoma in a colony of N:NIH (S)-bg-nu-xid
 mice. Waggie, K.S.; Wu-Owens, J.; Hollifield, V.; Hansen, C.T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (4): p.
 375-377; 1992 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Lymphoma
 
 Abstract:  During a 1-year period, 28 animals from a breeding
 colony of N:NIH(S)-bg-nu-xid mice were discovered to have
 rapidly enlarging subcutaneous swellings in the ventral,
 cervical, and axillary regions. Five of the mice also had hind
 limb paresis. Twenty-two of the mice were heterozygous nude
 females, five were homozygous nude males, and one was a
 homozygous nude female. All of the above mice were homo- or
 hemizygous for the beige and X-linked immunodeficiency
 mutations. The average age of the mice was 8.3 months.
 Generalized enlargement of the peripheral and internal lymph
 nodes was present at the time of necropsy examination. Other
 lesions commonly noted at necropsy included splenomegaly (15
 mice), pale and thickened ventral lumbar spinal musculature
 (11 mice), and opaque, thickened meninges of the brain (10
 mice). Histologic examination consistently disclosed
 infiltrates of neoplastic lymphoblasts in multiple tissues
 including lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and meninges of
 the brain and spinal cord. The cells were positive for IgG on
 immunofluorescent staining, suggesting that the tumors were of
 B cell origin. The neoplasms observed in these mice have
 several similarities to tumors found in immunodeficient
 humans, suggesting that these mice may serve as useful animal
 models of lymphoma.
 
 
 313                                    NAL Call. No.: SF406.L2
 The main provisions of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act
 1986. Morton, D.B.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services for Laboratory
 Animals; 1988. Laboratory Animal Science Association Silver
 Jubilee 1988 : collected papers to celebrate LASA's 25th
 anniversary / edited by J.H. Seamer. p. 27-35; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Laboratory animals; Animal
 welfare; Legislation; Facilities; Research projects; Licensing
 
 
 314                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Maintenance of primates in captivity for research: the need
 for naturalistic environments.
 Pereira, M.E.; Macedonia, J.M.; Haring, D.M.; Simons, E.L.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 40-60.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal research; Environment; Capture
 of animals; Natural history; Medical research; Nature
 conservation; Diets; Animal housing; Facilities
 
 
 315                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The maintenance of Schistocerca gregaria (Forskal), the desert
 locust in a controlled environment.
 Matthews, D.A.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (2): p. 87-95; 1991 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Schistocerca gregaria; Rearing techniques; Animal
 husbandry
 
 Abstract:  A regular supply of Schistocerca gregaria were
 required for neurobiological research at the Anatomy
 Department of the University of Wales College Cardiff. A
 breeding colony was therefore established within a
 conventiontal Animal Unit to provide these locusts at known
 stages during their development. This paper is intended to
 provide information which should prove useful to those who may
 be considering establishing a similar colony, or to those
 existing colony holders who may wish to compare and contrast
 the information described here with their own results. The
 life cycle of Schistocerca gregaria is divided into three main
 stages, the egg, the nymph and the adult. The holding
 conditions provided in our colons for adult locusts are
 described in this paper.
 
 
 316                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Management of an infestation of sucking lice in a colony of
 rhesus macaques. Mader, D.R.; Anderson, J.H.; Roberts, J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (3): p.
 252-255. ill; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Rhesus monkeys; Ectoparasitoses;
 Anoplura; Pediculus; Pest control; Insecticides
 
 
 317                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Management of craniotomy in young rabbits.
 Alberius, P.; Klinge, B.; Isaksson, S.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (1): p. 70-72; 1989 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Young animals; Skulls; Surgical
 operations
 
 Abstract:  A safe and easy-to-manage technique for various
 craniotomy procedures in young rabbits has been developed.
 This technique, which minimizes the need for special
 instrumentation, has been tested in 90 animals with a minimal
 mortality and morbidity: one death perioperatively caused by
 sagittal sinus bleeding and one rabbit disclosing a brief
 period of postoperative illness, respectively. The technique,
 including postsurgical strategy, is described in detail.
 
 
 318                                   NAL Call. No.: SF601.V38
 The management of Japanese quail and their use in virological
 research: a review.
 Ratnamohan, N.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.; 1985 Feb.
 Veterinary research communications v. 9 (1): p. 1-14; 1985
 Feb.  Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Poultry rearing; Virology; Laboratory animals;
 Japanese quails
 
 
 319                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Management of newly imported primates.
 Welshman, M.D.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1985 Nov.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 36 (2): p. 125-135; 1985 Nov.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Imports; Imported breeds; Animal
 husbandry; Animal health; Animal housing
 
 
 320                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The management of post-operative pain and distress in
 experimental animals. Flecknell, P.A.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1985 Nov.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 36 (2): p. 97-103; 1985 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Pain; Standards; Improvement;
 Analgesics; Surgical operations; Animal welfare; Anesthetics
 
 
 321                          NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9P6713 1984
 Management of reproduction in a breeding colony of bushbabies.
 Izard, M.K.; Simons, E.L.
 Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] : Cambridge University Press; 1986.
 Primate ecology and conservation / edited by James G. Else,
 Phyllis C. Lee. p. 315-323; 1986.  Paper presented at the
 "Proceedings of the Tenth Congress of the International
 Primatological Society," July 1984, Nairobi, Kenya. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal breeding methods; Laboratory
 rearing; Reproduction
 
 
 322                            NAL Call. No.: HV4708.O56  1992
 A manual of standard operating procedures for animal
 facilities. Olson, Merle E.; Morck, Douglas W.; Nabrotzky,
 Viola C. A. Calgary, Alta. : Dept. of Animal Care Services,
 University of Calgary,; 1992. 1 computer disk ; 3 1/2 in. + 1
 sheet.  Title from disk label.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal welfare; Veterinary surgery; Laboratory
 animals
 
 
 323                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Maternal factors affecting reproduction in a breeding colony
 of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis).
 Gardin, J.F.; Jerome, C.P.; Jayo, M.J.; Weaver, D.S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (3): p.
 205-212; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca; Reproduction; Maternal effects;
 Reproductive performance
 
 Abstract:  A breeding colony of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca
 fascicularis), composed of imported and colony-born animals
 and established for 9 years, was evaluated for maternal
 factors associated with reproductive failure. The factors
 evaluated included age, gravidity, parity, origin, previous
 stillbirths, clinical incidents and type of housing. The
 effects of each factor on pregnancy rate (PR), stillbirth rate
 (SR), infant mortality rate (IMR) and pregnancy success (PS)
 were evaluated. The overall colony rates were: PR = 53%, SR =
 22%, IMR = 22%, and PS = 60%. Neonatal death rate for the
 group was 12%. Pregnancy rate was most affected by maternal
 factors. Clinical incidents occurring during pregnancy were
 associated with a significant increase in the stillbirth rate,
 but did not affect infant mortality rate. Maternal age did not
 affect any of the measures of reproductive output. Pregnancy
 rate peaked at 6-8 years of age and decreased thereafter,
 while pregnancy success peaked at 9-11 years of age. Gravidity
 and parity had a positive linear relationship with pregnancy
 rate.
 
 
 324                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Measurement of cardiovascular and renal function in
 unrestrained hamsters. Fox, M.; Natarajan, V.; Trippodo, N.C.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (1): p.
 94-98; 1993 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Hamsters; Physiological functions; Measurement
 
 Abstract:  We describe a preparation for measuring blood
 pressure, left ventricular end diastolic pressure, heart rate,
 and renal excretory variables (volume, electrolytes,
 glomerular filtration rate) in hamsters. The new approach
 offers an advantage over previously described methods by
 eliminating the problems associated with restraint. Hamsters
 were surgically implanted with venous and arterial catheters.
 A specially constructed bladder catheter, which allows
 flushing to minimize errors due to dead space and permits
 urine collection without restraining the animals, was also
 implanted. The hamsters were allowed to recover from surgery
 for 3 hours before being studied in a specially designed
 lucite housing unit. Representative results were obtained in
 cardiomyopathic and healthy hamsters.
 
 
 325                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Mebendazole for worming mice: effectiveness and side effects.
 Baskerville, M.; Wood, M.; Newton, C.M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1988 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 22 (3): p. 263-268. ill; 1988 Jul. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Hymenolepis nana; Aspiculuris; Nematode
 control; Mebendazole; Adverse effects
 
 Abstract:  The use of mebendazole-treated diet (60 ppm)
 effectively controlled Hymenolepis nana and Aspiculuris
 tetraptera in a large mouse breeding colony. In a 3 generation
 pilot study using a medicated diet, there was some reduction
 in litter size and in female growth rate and an overall 2.07%
 incidence of kinky tails in the offspring. When the whole
 mouse colony was fed mebendazole-treated diet, a high
 incidence of kinky tails (maximum 46% of weaned offspring)
 occurred.
 
 
 326                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.H42
 Medical and behavioral benefits from primate research.
 King, F.A.; Yarbrough, C.J.
 Washington, D.C. : Foundation for Biomedical Research,
 [1985?]; 1985. Health benefits of animal research / edited by
 William I. Gay for the Foundation for Biomedical Research. p.
 65-79; 1985.  Literature review. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Animal breeding; Animal behavior;
 Reproduction; Infectious diseases; Medical research; Disease
 models
 
 
 327                               NAL Call. No.: QL737.P925H36
 Medical care and management of the squirrel monkey.
 Abee, C.R.
 New York : Plenum Press; 1985.
 Handbook of squirrel monkey research / edited by Leonard A.
 Rosenblum and Christopher L. Coe. p. 447-488. ill; 1985. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Squirrel monkeys; Animal husbandry; Animal
 housing; Cages; Sanitation; Hematology; Disease prevention;
 Injections
 
 
 328                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Mental well-being in anthropoids.
 Bramblett, C.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 1-11;
 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal health; Mental health; Animal
 housing; Animal welfare
 
 
 329                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 A method for sedation of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
 without handling.
 Roberts, K.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1988 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 39 (2): p. 117-118; 1988 Aug.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Anesthesia; Capture of animals; Animal
 housing; Cages
 
 
 330                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A method for the routine observation of sexual behaviour in
 rats. Mercier, O.; Perraud, J.; Stadler, J.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (2): p. 125-130. ill; 1987 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Lighting; Sexual behavior; Cages; Estrus
 
 
 331                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A method of remote physiological monitoring of a fully mobile
 primate in a single animal cage.
 Pearce, P.C.; Halsey, M.J.; Ross, J.A.S.; Luff, N.P.;
 Bevilacqua, R.A.; Maclean, C.J.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (2): p. 180-187. ill; 1989 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Cages; Physiology; Monitoring;
 Monitors; Remote control; Blood pressure; Electrocardiograms;
 Electroencephalograms
 
 Abstract:  A system was designed to allow the physiological
 monitoring of a fully mobile, unstressed baboon (Papio anubis)
 in a single animal cage for the purpose of measuring the
 changes occurring in a hyperbaric environment. It was required
 to operate for at least three months, both inside a pressure
 chamber and outside, and to measure the following parameters;
 electroencephalogram (EEG, three channels), electrooculogram
 (EOG), electromyelogram (EMG, two channels), electrocardiogram
 (ECG), arterial blood pressure, respiration and body
 temperature. Also in the system were catheters through which
 blood samples could be taken and intravenous drugs given. The
 overall system consisted of a harness and jacket, and
 umbilical and back pack, a combined electrical and fluid
 transmission swivel and a monitoring implant and catheters.
 
 
 332                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Microbial assessment of a single fumigation by formaldehyde of
 a multi-level animal facility.
 Gamble, M.R.; Needham, J.R.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 117-119; 1988. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Animal housing;
 Formaldehyde; Fumigation; Staphylococcus aureus; Bacillus
 subtilis; Disease prevention
 
 
 333                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Microbiologically monitored fumigation of a newly built SPF
 laboratoray rodent facility.
 Sebesteny, A.; Milite, G.; Martelossi, P.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1992 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 26 (2): p. 132-139; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mice; Laboratories; Fumigation; Gnotobiotic
 animals; Sterilizing; Methyl bromide; Monitoring
 
 Abstract:  The initial sanitization and sterilization of a
 newly built animal facility for the breeding and holding of
 specified pathogen free (SPF) rats and mice is described. The
 fumigation programme was started with methyl bromide treatment
 directed primarily against arthropods, followed by ammonia
 spray to kill coccidial oocysts and concluded by three
 formaldehyde treatments with fog and spray against bacteria
 and viruses. The practicalities and problems involved are
 described in detail and the rationale and purpose of the
 programme and its monitoring are discussed. The report is
 expected to contribute towards the establishment of a
 rational, efficient and standardized fumigation programme for
 SPF animal facilities, under increasing constraints of safety
 and environmental considerations concerning pollution with
 toxic and corrosive agents.
 
 
 334                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Microclimate in two types of rat cages.
 Hirsjarvi, P.A.; Valiaho, T.U.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (2): p. 95-98. ill; 1987 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Cages; Animal husbandry; Microclimate;
 Design
 
 
 335                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Microenvironmental conditions in isolator cages: an important
 research variable.
 Lipman, N.S.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Jun.
 Lab animal v. 21 (6): p. 23-27; 1992 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Microenvironments; Cages
 
 
 336                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Minerals leached into drinking water from rubber stoppers.
 Kennedy, B.W.; Beal, T.S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (3): p.
 233-236; 1991 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Drinkers; Stoppers; Minerals;
 Drinking water; Mineral content
 
 Abstract:  Drinking water and its delivery system are
 potential sources of variation in animal research. Concern
 arose that rubber stoppers used to cork water bottles might be
 a source of some nutritionally required minerals which could
 leach into drinking water. Six types of stoppers, each having
 different compositions, were cleaned with stainless-steel
 sipper tubes inserted into them and attached to polypropylene
 bottles filled with either deionized water (pH 4.5) or
 acidified-deionized water (pH 2.5). After six days of contact,
 water levels of copper, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc,
 chromium, and selenium were determined by atomic absorption
 spectroscopy. Additionally, three of the stopper types were
 analyzed for mineral content. Minerals were present in both
 stoppers and drinking water. Acidified-deionized water
 generally leached more minerals from the stoppers than did
 deionized water. The black stopper which is commonly used in
 animal facilities contained and leached measurable levels of
 some minerals, but it still can be recommended for typical
 animal husbandry uses, although other types of stoppers would
 be more suitable for specific nutritional and toxicologic
 studies.
 
 
 337                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Mirrors as enrichment for captive chimpanzees (Pan
 troglodytes). Lambeth, S.P.; Bloomsmith, M.A.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (3): p.
 261-266; 1992 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzees; Mirrors; Social environment;
 Enrichment; Social behavior
 
 Abstract:  At many facilities, limitations of the physical
 environment have reduced the opportunity for captive
 chimpanzees to live in large, naturalistic social groups.
 Convex mirrors used to increase visual access of neighboring
 groups may improve the social environment. This was tested in
 a study of 28 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) group-housed in
 conventional indoor/outdoor runs. A total of 47.8 hours of
 behavioral observations were conducted and comparisons made
 across three conditions: no mirror present, a mirror present
 with visual access to neighboring conspecifics, or a mirror
 present with visual access to the neighbors' empty run. When
 the mirror gave subjects visual access to neighboring animals,
 facial expressions, sexual, and agonistic behaviors increased,
 whereas affiliative behavior decreased compared with when no
 mirror was present. When the mirror gave subjects visual
 access to a neighbors' empty run, facial expressions and
 sexual behavior increased compared with when no mirror was
 present. When the mirror gave subjects visual access to a
 neighbor's empty run, agonism decreased compared with when a
 mirror gave subjects visual access to neighboring animals.
 When subjects had visual access to neighbors, they used the
 mirror 30% of the total data points; while they had visual
 access to the neighbors' empty run, they looked during 24% of
 the total data points. Juveniles' use of the mirror increased
 over time while adults' use remained stable. Adult males used
 the mirror less than did the other subjects. These findings
 indicate that a mirror allowing visual access to neighboring
 conspecifics has potential as an enrichment device that
 affects social behavior.
 
 
 338                         NAL Call. No.: RA1199.4.I5I58 1993
 Models for national/international coordination and
 facilitation of validation. Becking, G.C.
 Baltimore, MD : CAAT; 1993.
 The International status of validation of in vitro toxicity
 tests : a report of the CAAT/TCA workshop of June 16-20, 1991.
 p. 37-38; 1993.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal testing alternatives; Validity; Models;
 Testing; Evaluation
 
 
 339                         NAL Call. No.: RA1199.4.I5I58 1993
 Models for national/international facilitation and
 coordination of validation activities.
 Looy, H. van
 Baltimore, MD : CAAT; 1993.
 The International status of validation of in vitro toxicity
 tests : a report of the CAAT/TCA workshop of June 16-20, 1991.
 p. 36-37; 1993.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal testing alternatives; Validity;
 Information systems
 
 
 340                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Modern concepts in cage and equipment design.
 Klokager, F.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1987 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 38 (1): p. 55-58. ill; 1987 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Cages; Design; Air filters;
 Equipment; Animal housing
 
 
 341                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Modification of existing animal cages to meet the guide-lines
 set by the Council of Europe.
 Schlingmann, F.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1988 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 39 (3): p. 177-181. ill; 1988 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Europe; Rats; Animal housing; Cages;
 Modifications; Guidelines; European communities; Animal
 behavior; Animal experiments
 
 
 342                       NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.1662
 The Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus Kansas State
 University, College of Veterinary Medicine ; written and
 directed by Sharon Alger, Carol Jantzi. Kansas State
 University, College of Veterinary Medicine
 Manhattan, Kan. : The College,; 1990.
 1 videocassette (26 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  07-13-90.  VC
 NO 90-036.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Meriones unguiculatus; Gerbils as laboratory
 animals
 
 Abstract:  Presents an overview of gerbil taxonomy, behavior,
 adaptations, and history as a model in laboratory research.
 The topics of husbandry, general care, breeding, and
 preventive medicine through physical examination are also
 covered.
 
 
 343                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Monitoring of blood gas parameters and acid-base balance of
 pregnant and non-pregnant rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in
 routine experimental conditions.
 Barzago, M.M.; Bortolotti, A.; Omarini, D.; Aramayona, J.J.;
 Bonati, M. London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1992
 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 26 (2): p. 73-79; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Pregnancy; Blood; Gases; Acid base
 equilibrium; Anesthesia
 
 Abstract:  Blood gas parameters and acid-base balance values
 were determined in adult pregnant New Zealand rabbits
 (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in standard laboratory housing
 conditions and during anaesthesia with an association of
 ketamine-chlorpromazine, administered before surgical
 procedures. All the variables were also studied in adult non-
 pregnant female, used as controls. No differences in pH, sO2c,
 O2Hb, COHb, sO2m and a-vDO2 were found between pregnant and
 non-pregnant rabbits in physiological conditions and during
 anaesthesia. Ketamine-chlorpromazine and pregnancy seemed to
 change the other parameters used to assess the acid-base
 balance and the oxygenation conditions. Anaesthesia affected
 only Hb, O2Ct, O2Cap, C2O2 and P50. The additive effect of
 pregnancy and anaesthesia modified pCO2, PO2, HCO3-, TCO2,
 BEb, SBC, BEecf, A-aDO2, RI, MetHb, RHb, CaO2 and CvO2. The
 patterns described are close to those of other species,
 suggesting the New Zealand rabbit might be a reliable animal
 model for monitoring selected variables.
 
 
 344                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Monitoring potential zoonoses in a multifaceted veterinary
 resource facility: a comprehensive personnel health program.
 Matherne, C.; Hill, M.; Keeling, M.; Thomas, G.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 21 (4): p. 23-29; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Zoonoses; Laboratory animals
 
 
 345                                   NAL Call. No.: QL959.M25
 Mouse husbandry.
 Hetherington, C.M.
 Oxford : IRL; 1987.
 Mammalian development : a practical approach / edited by M.
 Monk. p. 1-12. ill; 1987. (Practical approach series). 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal husbandry; Cages; Diets;
 Environment; Handling; Identification; Animal breeding;
 Anesthetics; Transport
 
 
 346                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Mouse models of short- and long-term foreign body in the
 urinary bladder: analogies to the bladder segment of urinary
 catheters.
 Johnson, D.E.; Lockatell, C.V.; Hall-Craggs, M.; Warren, J.W.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (5): p.
 451-455; 1991 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal models; Bladder; Catheters; Foreign
 bodies; Bacterial diseases; Experiments; Long term experiments
 
 Abstract:  Catheter-associated bacteriuria is the most common
 infection occurring in hospitals, where urethral catheters are
 generally in place for a few days, and in nursing homes, where
 catheters may be in place for months or years. We developed
 murine models with intrabladder urinary catheters for studying
 complications of bacteriuria in short- and long-term
 catheterization. In the short-term model, a catheter segment
 was inserted transurethrally and lay free within the bladder
 lumen. Half of the animals expelled segments during a 2-to-7-
 day period, durations similar to catheterizations in
 hospitalized patients. For studies of long-term catheter use,
 the catheter segment was secured within the bladder by a
 single suture for up to 12 months. Antibiotics administered
 for 7 days after catheter placement and housing mice in cages
 with wire screen floors reduced spontaneous bacteriuria to an
 acceptably low incidence rate of only 7%. Proteus mirabilis
 bacteriuria of high concentration provoked the same
 complications that are common in patients with long-term
 catheters: acute pyelonephritis, chronic renal inflammation,
 and struvite stone formation. These models allow inoculation
 of the bacteria of interest and are suitable for studies of
 short- and long-term foreign body-associated bacteriuria and
 its complications.
 
 
 347                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 A mouse-friendly cage compared experimentally with a person
 oriented one. Wallace, M.E.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals, c1991-; 1993.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 7: p. 534-539; 1993. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Animal welfare
 
 
 348                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Murine cage density: a comparison between the reproductive
 performance of an inbred and outbred strain of monogamous
 breeding pairs.
 Eveleigh, J.R.; Williams, H.L.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (1): p. 43-47; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cage density; Reproductive performance
 
 Abstract:  Cage densities of CD-1 and Balb/c mice were
 compared during breeding. A monogamous breeding pair of
 outbred CD-1 mice have a greater cage density than inbred
 BALB/c mice at all stages of the reproductive cycle. At parity
 1 and 2 on day 19 of lactation cage density is at its greatest
 when the population of CD-1 mice expressed in weight are
 respectively 71 and 82% heavier than BALB/c. Sixty nine
 percent of CD-1 litters and 5% of BALB/c litters had a mean
 litter size at birth of 14 or more. It is suggested that
 further investigation is warranted into whether the minimum
 floor area of 300 cm2 recommended by the Laboratory Animal
 Breeders Association is optimal for outbred monogamous
 breeding pairs of mice.
 
 
 349                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Murine cage density: cage ammonia levels during the
 reproductive performance of an inbred strain and two outbred
 stocks of monogamous breeding pairs of mice.
 Eveleigh, J.R.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1993 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 27 (2): p. 156-160; 1993 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cage density
 
 Abstract:  The Laboratory Animal Breeders Association
 guidelines recommend a minimum floor area of 300 cm2 for a
 monogamous pair of inbred/outbred mice or a trio of inbreds.
 The mean level of ammonia produced during lactation from
 BALB/c, TO and CD-1 breeding pairs housed in M2 cages with a
 floor area of 300 cm2 on Day 4 after cleaning was 30 ppm, 87
 ppm and 92 ppm, respectively. All 3 strains of mice,
 particularly the outbred strains, were subjected to high
 levels of ammonia as compared with human long-term health and
 safety occupational exposure limits (25 ppm). However, there
 is a gradient of ammonia within an M2 breeding cage from the
 nest (19 ppm), to the food hopper, 77 ppm. By housing CD-1
 pairs of mice in RM2 cages which have more than double the
 floor area of M2 cages (676 cm2), the mean level of ammonia
 during lactation on Day 4 after cleaning was reduced to 26
 ppm. The reproductive performance on inbred/outbred strains of
 mice has to be equated with cage size (floor area) to maintain
 acceptable levels of ammonia. It is suggested that the
 recommended minimum floor areas for breeding mice be reviewed.
 
 
 350                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Murine encephalitozoonosis: the effect of age and mode of
 transmission on occurrence of infection.
 Liu, J.J.; Greeley, E.H.; Shadduck, J.A.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (6): p.
 675-679; 1988 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Encephalitozoon cuniculi; Protozoal
 infections; Age; Disease transmission
 
 Abstract:  Experiments were conducted to determine whether
 neonatal mice are more susceptible to E. cuniculi than adult
 mice, and whether vertical and/or horizontal transmission
 occur in murine encephalitozoonosis. E. cuniculi infection in
 neonates did not cause mortality or clinical signs, but did
 result in chronic infection. Despite initial age-related
 immunodeficiency, mice infected as neonates eventually
 developed humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against
 the parasite comparable to those seen in adult mice. The
 results suggested that neonatal mice are not more susceptible
 to E. cuniculi than adult mice. Pups from either infected or
 normal parents did not differ in humoral and cell-mediated
 immune responses after challenge, suggesting that pups from
 infected parents were not infected with E. cuniculi during
 gestation. In contrast, mice became infected by caging with
 infected mice demonstrating that horizontal infection does
 occur.
 
 
 351                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The muskrat in biomedical research.
 Doyle, R.E.; Panneton, W.M.; Vogler, G.A.; Romeo, J.P.;
 Watson, B.J.; Higgins, B.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (6): p.
 667-674. ill; 1988 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Muskrats; Animal husbandry; Animal health;
 Handling; Quarantine; Medical research; Animal experiments
 
 Abstract:  Muskrats are aquatic rodents of moderate size which
 are plentiful throughout North America, but are not used
 commonly in the laboratory. Recently, we tested the
 feasibility of muskrats as experimental models and have found
 them to be acquired and cared for easily in conventional
 laboratory animal facilities. Some of their natural
 characteristics and diseases are described. The husbandry
 techniques that we used are presented and form a base for the
 preparation of future guidelines for the maintenance and use
 of feral animals in research. The results of some initial
 experiments testing the muskrat's utility for investigations
 of cardiorespiratory control mechanisms also are presented.
 Our data show that even anesthetized muskrats possess brisk
 and dramatic cardiovascular and respiratory reflexes. Our
 findings that their brains possess the cytoarchitectural and
 myeloarchitectural features comparable to other mammals,
 combined with their relative uniformity in size, has allowed
 us to locate specific neuronal loci stereotaxically. We
 suggest that the muskrat be considered as an experimental
 animal model for studies of the neural control of
 cardiorespiratory systems.
 
 
 352                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Mycoplasma pulmonis-host relationships in a breeding colony of
 Sprague-Dawley rats with enzootic murine respiratory
 mycoplasmosis.
 Lindsay, J.R.; Davidson, M.K.; Schoeb, T.R.; Cassell, G.H.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (6):
 597-608. ill; 1985 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mycoplasma; Respiratory diseases;
 Histopathology
 
 
 353                              NAL Call. No.: HV4758.N3 1991
 National Institute of Health nonhuman primate management
 plan..  Nonhuman primate management plan, Rev..
 NIH Office of Animal Care and Use
 Bethesda, Md. : Office of Animal Care and Use, National
 Institutes of Health,; 1991.
 49 p., [5] p. of plates : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes
 bibliographical references (p. 43-49).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates as laboratory animals; Laboratory
 animals; Animal welfare
 
 
 354                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 National Laboratory Animal Center established and regional
 activities promoted in Finland.
 Hanninen, O.O.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 459-464. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Finland; Training; Education; Animal welfare;
 Laboratory animals; Facilities; Legislation
 
 
 355                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A naturally occurring epizootic of simian agent 8 in the
 baboon. Levin, J.L.; Hilliard, J.K.; Lipper, S.L.; Butler,
 T.M.; Goodwin, W.J. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1988 Aug. Laboratory animal science
 v. 38 (4): p. 394-397; 1988 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Baboons; Epizootiology; Herpetoviridae;
 Isolation; Identification
 
 Abstract:  An epizootic of genital lesions was observed on
 baboons (four Papio sub-species) housed in two different
 outdoor breeding corrals. Serological analysis revealed strong
 prevalence of antibodies to Simian Agent 8 (SA8). This
 herpesvirus was subsequently recovered from skin lesions and
 identified by restriction endonuclease digestion of infected
 cell DNA. Observations of lesion type, frequency and location
 were suggestive of venereal transmission. The remarkable
 similarity between infection resulting from SA8 in baboons and
 herpes simplex virus in man suggests that the baboon is an
 excellent model in which to study genital herpes virus
 transmission and infection.
 
 
 356                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 A new animal house designed to house animals for the routine
 production of antisera.
 Ricketts, T.; McConomy, M.; Wills, J.E.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1985 May.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 36 (1): p. 7-17. ill; 1985 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Design;
 Antiserum
 
 
 357                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A new device for long-term continuous enteral nutrition of
 rats by elmentary diet via gastrostomy, following extensive
 oesophageal or lower gastrointestinal surgery.
 Muller, G.; Schaarschmidt, K.; Stratmann, U.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1992 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 26 (1): p. 9-14; 1992 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Tube feeding; Cannulae; Cannulation; Long
 term experiments; Elemental diets; Feces collection
 
 Abstract:  A device for intragastric nutrition of unsedated
 and minimally restrained rats under complete alimentary
 abstinence has been developed. The cannulation system consists
 of an infusion pump, modified glass syringe as flow swivel,
 rat-harness and a silicone-tube-gastrostomy. The animals were
 kept in special cages and coprophagy was prevented by an own
 model of faecal collection cup. Methionine and Ca-
 glycerophosphate had to be added to a commercial elementary
 diet. The rats were allowed to move freely during intragastric
 infusion, which was applied for 14 to 28 days in 118 Wistar-
 rats (350-400 g). They maintained weight on an energy supply
 of 86.4 kcal/day.
 
 
 358                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A new model for study of pancreatic exocrine secretion:
 tethered pancreatic fistula rat.
 Toriumi, Y.; Samuel, I.; Wilcockson, D.P.; Joehl, R.J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1994 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 44 (3): p.
 270-273; 1994 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Animal models; Animal welfare; Pancreas;
 Fistula; Restraint of animals; Tethering
 
 Abstract:  Diversion and recirculation of bile and pancreatic
 juice in rats are done in studies of pancreatic exocrine
 secretion. Previously, the modified Bollman cage was used to
 restrain rats with bile and pancreatic fistulas. To mimic
 physiologic conditions as closely as possible and to develop a
 more humane model, we designed a partial-restraint tethering
 system to study pancreatic exocrine secretion. Eight rats were
 prepared with biliary pancreatic, and duodenal fistulas, of
 which five were given enteral supplements via a gastric
 fistula and three were given saline supplements via a jugular
 venous line. Catheters exited at the nape of the neck and
 passed through the hollow of a cable coil that tethered the
 rat. On the fourth postoperative day pancreatic juice flow and
 protein output were studied. The tethering system allowed
 grooming, feeding, and ample mobility This model of the
 tethered pancreatic fistula rat is a more humane model for
 studies of pancreatic exocrine secretion in conscious rats,
 compared with the Bollman cage system of near total restraint.
 
 
 359                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 New perspectives in the animal house.
 Hampson, J.E.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (3): p. 219-222; 1989 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: England; Laboratory animals; Animal housing;
 Animal welfare; Legislation
 
 
 360                        NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.973
 Non-human primates basic needs, handling and care.
 Southers, Jan
 American College of Toxicology, Meeting_1990 :_Orlando,
 Fla.),Production Plus, Inc
 Symposium: Animal Welfare Compliance for Study Directors 1990
 : Orlando, Fla. Closter, N.J. : Production Plus, Inc.,
 [1990?]; 1990.
 1 videocassette (34 min., 43 sec.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  VHS. 
 Videotape of a presentation at Symposium: Animal Welfare
 Compliance for Study Directors; presented at the Eleventh
 Annual Meeting of the American College of Toxicology, Orlando,
 Fla., Oct. 1990.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Primates as laboratory
 animals; Primates; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  The physical facilities, environment, caging,
 sanitization, watering, feeding vermin control, identification
 of non-human primates. Emphasis is given to preventive
 medicine, and safety programs required for use with non-human
 primates.
 
 
 361                                NAL Call. No.: Slide no.437
 Nonhuman primates biosafety..  Nonhuman primates : biosafety
 Broderson, J. Roger
 University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational Resources, American College of Laboratory Animal
 Medicine, National Agricultural Library (U.S.)
 Seattle, WA : Produced and distributed by the Health Sciences
 Center for Educational Resources, University of Washington,;
 1992.
 60 slides : col. + 1 sound cassette (25 min.) + 1 guide.
 (Laboratory animal medicine and science. Series 2 ; V-9018). 
 Developed for the American College of Laboratory Animal
 Medicine.  Sound accompaniment compatible for manual and
 automatic operation.  Accompanying guide includes script. 
 Portions of this project have been funded by grant from the
 National Agricultural Library.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates as laboratory animals; Animal
 experimentation; Primates
 
 Abstract:  Covers four major classes of health hazards within
 a nonhuman primate facility; practices, equipment and facility
 design to help prevent disease or injury from these hazards.
 
 
 362                                     NAL Call. No.: 410 B77
 The number of males in a primate troop.
 Ridley, M.
 London : Bailliere Tindall; 1986 Dec.
 Animal behaviour v. 34 (pt.6): p. 1848-1858; 1986 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Breeding season; Sexual behavior; Group
 size; Reproductive behavior; Male animals
 
 
 363                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A nylon ball device for primate environmental enrichment.
 Ross, P.W.; Everitt, J.I.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (4): p.
 481-483. ill; 1988 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environment; Cages; Toys; Nylon; Animal
 welfare
 
 
 364                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Observations on a caging system for housing stump-tailed
 macaques. Burt, D.A.; Plant, M.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (3): p. 175-179; 1990 Dec.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca arctoides; Cages; Laboratory rearing;
 Animal welfare; Enrichment
 
 Abstract:  This paper describes the introduction of a modified
 caging system and the benefits to both the animals and staff.
 
 
 365                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Observations on a sandy lop breeding colony over an eleven
 period (1978-1988). Batchelor, G.R.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (2): p. 115-131; 1990 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Reproductive performance; Breeds; Breed
 differences; Litter size; Litter traits; Breeding efficiency;
 Mortality
 
 Abstract:  There are three main incentives for collecting data
 on this rabbit strain: 1. There is a large mass of breeding
 data available, covering theperiod from 1978 to the present
 day. 2. There has been a noticeable increase in breeding
 success (anda reduction in losses) seemingly to correspond
 with the diet given, althoughthis may not be the sole reason.
 3. Although the pre-weaning mortality rate has been reduced
 overthe last four years to a mean of around 15% (range 8-29%),
 the littering rate,although showing an improvement, is still
 under 80% (range 70-77%).Whether further improvement is
 possible is one question which may beanswered by the
 publication of this paper.
 
 
 366                                   NAL Call. No.: SF724.T72
 Observations on causes of mortality in a guinea pig breeding
 colony. Ocholi, R.A.; Ibu, J.O.
 Ibadan, Nigeria : Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University
 of Ibadan; 1989. Tropical veterinarian v. 7 (3/4): p. 128-130;
 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Mortality; Bacterial diseases;
 Salmonella; Escherichia coli; Coccidiosis; Eimeria; Animal
 health
 
 
 367                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Of mice and megabytes: a computer-based animal care management
 system. Hahn, J.
 New York : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Jan.
 Lab animal v. 18 (1): p. 26-29; 1989 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal husbandry; Records; Computer
 applications
 
 
 368                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 On the care of captive chimpanzees: methods of enrichment.
 Rumbaugh, D.M.; Washburn, D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E.S.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 357-375.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzee; Capture of animals; Animal housing;
 Cages; Design; Diets; Facilities; Equipment
 
 
 369                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Opening a world-class chimpanzee facility: ingredients for
 successful public relations.
 Miller, L.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Jul.
 Lab animal v. 21 (7): p. 23-28, 30; 1992 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzees; Public relations
 
 
 370                                 NAL Call. No.: QP82.2.M5O7
 Operations and management of government owned--contractor
 operated microwave exposure facility.
 ERCI Facilities Service Corp
 Fairfax, VA : ERCI, [1988?]; 1988, reprinted 1988.
 3 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Cover title.  February 28, 1988. 
 Funding no. DAMD17-85-C-5083.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Microwaves; Physiological effect; Rats as
 laboratory animals, Effect of radiation
 
 
 371                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Organophosphate toxicity in rats associated with contaminated
 bedding. Gibson, S.V.; Besch-Williford, C.; Raisbeck, M.F.;
 Wagner, J.E.; McLaughlin, R.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (6): p.
 789-791; 1987 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Toxicity; Organophosphorus compounds;
 Terbufos; Cages; Litter; Softwoods; Contamination
 
 
 372                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 An outbreak of Plasmodium inui malaria in a colony of diabetic
 Rhesus monkeys. Schofield, L.D.; Bennett, B.T.; Collins, W.E.;
 Beluhan, F.Z. Joliet, Ill. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1985 Apr. Laboratory animal science
 v. 35 (2): p. 167-168; 1985 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Diabetes; Plasmodium; Facilities;
 Therapy
 
 
 373                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Particle size of airborne mouse crude and defined allergens.
 Sakaguchi, M.; Inouye, S.; Miyazawa, H.; Kamimura, H.; Kimura,
 M.; Yamazaki, S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (3): p.
 234-236; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal housing; Laboratory rearing;
 Environment; Allergens; Air pollution; Allergies; Animal
 experiments
 
 Abstract:  Laboratory animal allergy is a serious occupational
 diseases of many workers and scientists engaged in animal
 experimentation. Control measures depend upon characterization
 of allergens including airborne particles. This study measured
 the particle size of crude mouse urine and pelt aeroallergens
 generated in mouse housing rooms and compared them with mouse
 serum albumin, a defined major allergen. Allergens were
 detected by specific immunological methods. Most crude and
 defined allergens (74.5-86.4%) concentrated on a filter with a
 retention size greater than 7 micromiter. In distrubed air,
 allergen concentration increased 1.4 (albumin) to 5 (crude)
 fold and the proportion of small particles increased from 1.4%
 in calm air to 4. 5% in distrubed air. This information on the
 generation and size distribution of aeroallergens will be
 important in the development of effective counter measures.
 
 
 374                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Passive infrared movement detector, a new equipment to monitor
 motor activity of small rodents in normal cages.
 Sigg, H.; Tamborini, P.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 349-352; 1988.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents; Cages; Movements; Monitoring; Detectors;
 Recordings; Computer applications
 
 
 375                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 PC-based facility management.
 Flato, A.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1994 Jul.
 Lab animal v. 23 (7): p. 37-40; 1994 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Monitoring; Microcomputers
 
 
 376                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Persistent free-running circannual reproductive cycles during
 prolonged exposure to a constant 12L:12D photoperiod in
 laboratory woodchucks (Marmota monax).
 Concannon, P.W.; Parks, J.E.; Roberts, P.J.; Tennant, B.C.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (4): p.
 382-391; 1992 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmota monax; Reproduction; Photoperiod
 
 Abstract:  Serum levels of gonadal steroid were assayed at
 approximately 3-month intervals in groups of 5 to 8 male or
 female woodchucks which were exposed to a natural photoperiod
 for 1 year as yearlings or 3 years as adults (Study 1), or a
 constant photoperiod of 12L:12D from birth for 4.5 years
 (Study 2). After 4.5 years of 12L:12D, food intake was
 measured in November and compared with that in natural
 photoperiod animals (Study 3). Other groups of 11 males and 3
 females were housed in 12L:12D for 2.5 years after capture at
 2 months of age, and gonadal structure and serum steroid
 levels in November were compared with those of animals at
 selected times in the normal annual cycle (Study 4). All
 animals were provided food and water ad libitum and were not
 induced to hibernate. In Study 1, normal circannual breeding
 season elevations in testosterone in males and in progesterone
 in females were detected in most animals maintained in natural
 photoperiod. In Study 2, similar cycles persisted for 4.5
 years in animals exposed to 12L:12D. However, based on
 quarterly blood samples, obvious asynchrony relative to
 natural light animals appeared to develop after 2, 3, or 4
 years, with apparent free-running intervals of about 10 to 11
 months. In Study 3, mean daily food consumption in late autumn
 for woodchucks in the 12L:12D group was 72% greater than
 animals in the natural photoperiod. In Study 4, some
 woodchucks exposed to 12L:12D for only 2.5 years had
 prematurely increased spermatogenic activity, Leydig tissue
 development, and elevated serum testosterone levels in
 November. They were similar in November to those in natural
 photoperiod animals in March, and significantly greater than
 those in natural photoperiod animals in November when normal
 regression and repair of the testis was complete. Likewise,
 females in the 12L:12D group had luteinized follicles and
 elevated progesterone in November which were not noted in
 natural photoperiod animals and which were similar to those
 observe
 
 
 377                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Persistent reduction of B virus (Herpesvirus simiae)
 seropositivity in rhesus macaques acquired for a study of
 renal allograft tolerance. Olson, L.C.; Pryor, W.H. Jr;
 Thomas, J.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (6): p.
 540-544; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Herpesviridae; Disease control;
 Immunosuppression; Screening; Animal housing; Immunodiagnosis;
 Culling
 
 Abstract:  One hundred and two rhesus macaques were used in a
 study of renal allograft tolerance. Each animal was monitored
 serologically more than one time to determine its B virus
 (Herpesvirus simiae) antibody status. The follow-up period for
 some individuals was 3 years, extending from 1986 to 1989. The
 accumulated test results eventually provided an opportunity to
 retrospectively support a contention that a small research
 colony of rhesus macaques could become and remain B virus
 seronegative if the animals were housed individually,
 monitored periodically, acquired only if they were
 seronegative, and culled if they converted to positive status.
 It was also possible that the test results might disclose
 useful information about the influence of acute
 immunosuppression on the reliability of determining B virus
 antibody status by serologic methods, and help formulate
 guidelines for selecting donor-recipient pairs. A review of
 the serologic test results disclosed that antibody status
 before the initiation of experimental therapy, and subsequent
 seroreactivity, did not change throughout the experimental
 lifetime of 92 monkeys. The few exceptions were six juveniles
 that lost detectable antibody, and four other juveniles that
 converted to positive. Preliminary data suggested that total
 lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and splenectomy were associated
 with the loss of detectable antibody; however, further study
 is needed to establish the validity and significance of this
 association. No other unexpected or unexplained results were
 associated with concomitant periods of acute
 immunosuppression. The number of seropositive animals in the
 colony was reduced to three through attrition and culling by
 the end of 1989. These three seropositive animals were culled
 shortly thereafter, and there were no conversions to
 seropositive during the subsequent 2 years. The findings
 suggested that research institutions with a small number of
 rhesus macaques could reliably achieve B virus seronegative
 status
 
 
 378                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Persistent sympathetic nervous system arousal associated with
 tethering in cynomolgus macaques.
 Adams, M.R.; Kaplan, J.R.; Manuck, S.B.; Uberseder, B.;
 Larkin, K.T. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1988 Jun. Laboratory animal science
 v. 38 (3): p. 279-281; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca; Tethering; Heart rate; Sympathetic
 nervous system; Restraint of animals; Animal housing
 
 Abstract:  The swivel-tether system has been used extensively
 in biomedical research involving nonhuman primates, yet there
 has been little or no investigation into potential adverse
 influences of this form of restraint on research results. In
 the study described here, a portable electrocardiographic
 telemetry system was used for continuous monitoring of the
 heart rate of 26 cynomolgus monkeys while: (a) pair-caged, 8
 weeks prior to tethering; (b) singly-caged, tethered; (c)
 singly-caged, tethered, administered propranolol (30
 mg/kg/day) in the diet; (d) group-housed (five monkeys per
 group), 1 week after group formation; and (e) group-housed
 (five monkeys per group), 4 weeks after group formation.
 Tethering resulted in persistent elevations in heart rate
 relative to the other conditions. Administration of
 propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, resulted in an
 abrupt, sustained decrease in heart rate indicating that the
 increase in heart rate associated with tethering was due to
 persistent stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system.
 Since multiple aspects of cardiovascular function are
 influenced by the sympathetic nervous system, and other organs
 and systems (e.g., pituitary-gonadal) also may be affected,
 investigators using the swivel-tether system should be
 cognizant of these potential effects when designing
 experiments and interpreting the results.
 
 
 379                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Pickle barrels as enrichment objects for rhesus macaques.
 Lehman, S.M.; Lessnau, R.G.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (4): p.
 392-397; 1992 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Environment; Enrichment
 
 Abstract:  Two breeding groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca
 mulatta) housed in outdoor enclosures on Key Lois island were
 observed for 84 hours. Instantaneous scan sampling of a focal
 animal was used to gather data to test hypotheses concerning
 frequencies of agonistic and affiliative behaviors as well as
 differential use of pickle barrels as enrichment objects. Type
 of barrel used, behavior, and age/sex class of the animal were
 noted. Barrels were arranged three ways: unattached, on a
 swivel, and stationary. The behaviors of animals in an
 enriched environment were compared with control condition
 animals, which did not have pickle barrels. Animals in an
 enriched environment accounted for 60.8% (n = 56) of total
 affiliative contact, 62.2% (n = 399) of total social grooming,
 and 26% (n = 5) of total agonistic noncontact. A total of 134
 scans of barrel use were observed. Analyses of the data showed
 that swivel and stationary barrels were used the most (55% of
 all scans of barrel use). Yearlings, juvenile females, and old
 males used barrels most often (82.8% of all scans of barrel
 use), although they constituted only 39% of the enriched
 environment population. In this study, pickle barrels provided
 enrichment for young and old animals of both sexes.
 
 
 380                                   NAL Call. No.: QL750.E74
 Plasma-testosterone development in colony and individually
 housed male guinea pigs.
 Sachser, N.; Prove, E.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Paul Parey; 1988 Sep.
 Ethology v. 79 (1): p. 62-70; 1988 Sep.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Male animals; Animal housing; Blood
 plasma; Testosterone; Animal behavior; Relationships
 
 
 381                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Platelet function testing in the pony.
 Boudreaux, M.K.; Wagner-Mann, C.; Purhoit, R.; Hankes, G.;
 Spano, J.; Pablo, L.; Lee, S.; Conti, J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (4): p.
 448-451; 1988 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Horses; Platelets; Isolation; Testing
 
 Abstract:  Platelet isolation techniques and platelet function
 were evaluated in 35 adult ponies. Platelet recovery from
 whole blood was consistent and the preparation of platelet
 rich plasma was facilitated by an enhanced erythrocyte
 sedimentation rate. All platelet samples aggregated in
 response to 10 microM ADP. However, concentrations of ADP as
 high as 100 microM did not elicit significant 14C-erotonin
 release. Collagen induced irreversible platelet aggregation
 and 14C-serotonin release in all samples. The threshold dose
 for collagen in most ponies was 1.5 microgram. Arachidonic
 acid (500 microM) failed to induce irreversible platelet
 aggregation or 14C-serotonin release in any of the samples
 evaluated. Pony platelets were nonresponsive to epinephrine
 (5.5 microM).
 
 
 382                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Poor breeding performance of rabbits.
 Assal, A.N.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1988 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 39 (3): p. 183-187; 1988 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Australia; Rabbits; Animal breeding; Performance;
 Newborn animals; Survival; Mortality; Postmortem examinations;
 Animal husbandry
 
 
 383                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Population density and growth rate in laboratory mice.
 Peters, A.; Festing, M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1990 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 24 (3): p. 273-279; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cage density; Growth rate
 
 Abstract:  Home Office guidelines recommend an area of 60 cm2
 per mouse for growing mice up to 30 g. However, the overall
 growth rate, and final adrenal weight of weanling BALB/c and
 MF1 strain mice was not affected by being housed at a density
 of down to 27 cm2 per mouse, though there was some evidence of
 strain differences in ability to tolerate such dense housing.
 The presence of cage accessories had no effect on growth rate
 of BALB/c and female mice, but reduced growth of MF1 and male
 mice, though the effect was small. It is concluded that
 present Home Office guidelines make a generous provision for
 the space requirements of growing laboratory mice, and that
 the use of cage accessories of varying design may be worth
 exploring in more detail.
 
 
 384                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Practical and effective eradication of pinworms (Syphacia
 muris) in rats by use of fenbendazole.
 Coghlan, L.G.; Lee, D.R.; Psencik, B.; Weiss, D.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (5): p.
 481-487; 1993 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Syphacia; Fenbendazole
 
 Abstract:  Oxyurid parasites are common contaminants of
 laboratory rodents, and despite many described treatments, no
 method has assumed preeminence. Limitations in drug efficacy
 and the general inability to control for exposure to infective
 eggs are the primary contributors to treatment failure. In
 addition, some effective drugs must be eliminated from
 consideration because of narrow safety margins, other toxic
 aspects, or concerns related to particular uses of the
 experimental animals. As an alternative to currently described
 treatments or surgical derivation, we conducted an efficacy
 study against Syphacia muris in rats with a new fenbendazole-
 based protocol. Fenbendazole is a highly efficacious broad-
 spectrum anthelmintic with adulticidal, larvicidal, and
 ovicidal actions. Its pharmacokinetic behavior, ovicidal
 activity, and exceptionally wide safety margin in rats and
 mice make it an attractive choice for pinworm treatment.We
 used a 150-ppm medicated feed formulation to reach a targeted
 dose of 8.0 to 12.0 mg/kg/day in three separate studies
 designed to assess drug intake and efficacy under different
 housing conditions and in breeding and nonbreeding populations
 of ACI rats. In all cases, drug was given on alternating
 weeks, and nonbreeding populations were medicated for a
 cumulative period of 14 days. The same schedule was used for
 breeding populations, but the treatment was repeated after a
 2-week rest period to ensure sufficient exposure for newly
 weaned animals. The results of our study indicate that our
 described treatment, in combination with environmental control
 measures against pinworm eggs, is capable of eliminating S.
 muris.
 
 
 385                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Practical methods for the prevention of genetic contamination
 in inbred and congenic rat and mouse colonies.
 Peters, A.G.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1986 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 37 (1): p. 17-23. ill; 1986 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mice; Animal breeding; Inbred lines;
 Genetic control; Strains
 
 
 386                                 NAL Call. No.: RC261.A2R62
 Practices for controlling genetic quality of mice.
 Bailey, D.W.; Scott, O.C.A.
 New York : Pergamon Press; 1987.
 Rodent tumor models in experimental cancer therapy / edited by
 Robert F. Kallman. p. 57-58; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Neoplasms; Genetic control; Animal
 breeding; Hybrids; Tissues; Transplantation
 
 
 387                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Preliminary characterization of hereditary cerebellar ataxia
 in rats. La Regina, M.C.; St. Louis, MO; Yates-Siilata, K.;
 Woods, L.; Tolbert, D. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association
 for Laboratory Animal Science; 1992 Feb. Laboratory animal
 science v. 42 (1): p. 19-26; 1992 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Hereditary diseases; Cerebellar ataxia;
 Disease models; Cells; Cerebellum
 
 Abstract:  A spontaneous model of Purkinje cell degeneration
 in rats is described. Breeding data indicate that the
 condition is hereditary and not sex linked. The breeding
 colony has remained free of common murine pathogens, including
 parvovirus. In older rats with pronounced ataxia, the major
 lesions consisted of greatly reduced numbers or complete
 absence of Purkinje cells (PCs), particularly in the anterior
 lobe of the cerebellum. There was a decreased thickness and
 increased cellular density of the molecular layer and
 degeneration of the inferior olivary nuclei. Morphometric
 analysis indicated that the anterior lobes of affected rats
 were 52% smaller than those of normal rats. In young rats,
 before severe signs of ataxia had developed, microscopic
 changes were minimal. The preliminary findings are discussed
 in relationship to human cerebellar ataxias and mouse models
 of Purkinje cell degeneration.
 
 
 388                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 A preliminary survey of the incidence of abnormal behavior in
 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) relative to housing condition.
 Bayne, K.; Dexter, S.; Suomi, S.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 May.
 Lab animal v. 21 (5): p. 38, 40, 42-46; 1992 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Abnormal behavior; Animal housing
 
 
 389                                  NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 Pressure for better care for chimpanzees in captivity.
 Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical
 Experiments; 1988 Mar.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 15 (3): p.
 255-259; 1988 Mar.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Chimpanzee; Facilities; Animal housing;
 Animal welfare; Regulations; Usda
 
 
 390                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Prevalence of Campylobacter in infant juvenile and adult
 laboratory primates. Russell, R.G.; Krugner, L.; Tsai, C.C.;
 Ekstrom, R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (6): p.
 711-714; 1988 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Young animal diseases; Neonates;
 Campylobacter; Infection; Incidence
 
 Abstract:  A cross-sectional study of Campylobacter spp.
 infection was conducted on 125 infant (Macaca nemestrina and
 Macaca fascicularis) in an infant primate nursery housing
 infants from birth to 18 months of age, and 145 M. nemestrina
 aged from 4 months to 15 years at another facility (Primate
 Field Station) housing animals from birth to aged adults. The
 objective was to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter
 spp. in various age groups and to investigate the correlation
 with diarrhea. In the Infant Primate Research Laboratory
 approximately 70% of infants were infected at 18 months-old.
 Campylobacter coli was isolated from approximately two-thirds
 of the infected infants. One-third were Campylobacter jejuni
 and occasional infants were infected with a naladixic acid
 resistant, hippurate negative (NAR) Campylobacter spp. At the
 Primate Field Station virtually all animals cultured in 4-6
 month-old, 16-20 month-old, and 3-5 year-old age groups were
 positive. Approximately one-third of middle-aged adults (10-15
 years old) were positive with C. coli or NAR Campylobacter
 spp. Environmental factors such as location and movement of
 animals may provide an explanation for the prevalence data
 obtained in the two facilities and different age groups of
 animals. An etiologic role of Campylobacter spp. in diarrhea
 of laboratory primates was not established in this study.
 
 
 391                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Prevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus and feline
 leukemia virus infections in random-source cats.
 Glennon, P.J.; Cockburn, T.; Stark, D.M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (6): p.
 545-547; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cats; Feline immunodeficiency virus; Leukemia;
 Feline oncovirus; Disease prevalence; Mixed infections;
 Serological surveys; Sex differences; Sources
 
 Abstract:  Retroviral serologic profiles were generated for
 506 random-source cats (Felis catus) that were received by our
 facility during a twenty-month period. Feline leukemia virus
 antigens were detected in plasma samples from 26 (5.1%) of the
 cats. Antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus were present
 in 24 (4.7%) of the samples tested. A single cat (0.2%) was
 positive for both viruses. Neither gender nor vendor
 correlation with retroviral seropositivity could be
 demonstrated.
 
 
 392                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Prevalence rates of infectious agents among commercial
 breeding populations of rats and mice.
 Casebolt, D.B.; Lindsey, J.R.; Cassell, G.H.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (3): p.
 327-329; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Rats; Mice; Animal husbandry; Infectious
 diseases; Bacteria; Viruses; Parasites; Serological diagnosis
 
 
 393                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Prevention of cage-associated distress.
 Spinelli, J.S.; Markowitz, H.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1985 Nov.
 Lab animal v. 14 (8): p. 19-22, 24, 28; 1985 Nov.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Cage rearing; Stress;
 Prevention
 
 
 394                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9C86
 Primate colony management of harem breeding groups of rhesus
 monkeys (Macaca mulatta).
 Goo, G.P.
 New York : Van Nostrand Reinhold; 1986.
 Current perspectives in primate biology / edited by David M.
 Taub and Frederick A. King. p. 71-78; 1986.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Macaca mulatta; Groups;
 Management; Animal breeding; Reproduction; Mortality
 
 
 395                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 Primate facilities and environmental enrichment: an ecological
 and evolutionary perspective.
 Bercovitch, F.B.; Kessler, M.J.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals, c1991-; 1993.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 7: p. 435-439; 1993. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environment; Enrichment
 
 
 396                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 The Primate Information Center.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 15 (3): p. 44-45; 1986 Apr.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Primates; Organizations; Facilities;
 Information centers
 
 
 397                           NAL Call. No.: RC862.C6P75  1993
 A Primate model for the study of colitis and colonic carcinoma
 the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus).
 Clapp, Neal K.,
 Boca Raton : CRC Press,; 1993.
 339 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Colitis; Colon (Anatomy); Saguinus oedipus
 
 
 398                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 Primate preference for outdoors.
 Pereira, M.E.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals; 1991.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 5: p. 313-315; 1991. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal housing; Environment;
 Enrichment; Animal welfare
 
 
 399                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Primate research models and environmental enrichment.
 Markowitz, H.; Line, S.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 203-212.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environment; Cages; Social behavior;
 Laboratory rearing; Animal research; Models
 
 
 400                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 A primer for anti-dissectionists.
 Bickleman, T.G.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals; 1991.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 5: p. 264-265; 1991.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Cages; Enrichment; Animal behavior
 
 
 401                                   NAL Call. No.: RM267.E97
 Principles of animal care.
 Bruhin, H.
 London : Academic Press; 1986.
 Experimental models in antimicrobial chemotherapy / [edited
 by] Oto Zak, Merle A. Sande. v. 1 p. 7-18. ill; 1986. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare; Medical
 research; Ethics; Animal experiments; Breeding;
 Identification; Nutrition; Guidelines
 
 
 402                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.L274
 Principles of animal husbandry.
 Wilson, M.S.
 Chichester [England] : Wiley; 1987.
 Laboratory animals : an introduction for new experimenters /
 edited by A.A. Tuffery. p. 99-116; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Laboratory animals; Cage size;
 Veterinary hygiene; Disease control; Drinking water; Animal
 feeding; Animal husbandry
 
 
 403                               NAL Call. No.: SF406.B5 1987
 Principles of laboratory animal management., 3rd ed..
 Blackshaw, Judith K.; Allan, David J.
 N.S.W., Australia : Australian Society for the Study of Animal
 Behaviour, [1987?]; 1987.
 103 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.  Includes bibliographies and index.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal welfare
 
 
 404                                   NAL Call. No.: aQL55.B36
 Priniciples of aseptic technique.
 Schofield, J.C.
 Beltsville, Md. : USDA, National Agricultural Library; 1990
 Apr. Essentials for animal research : a primer for research
 personnel / by B.T. Bennett, M.J. Brown and J.C. Schofield. p.
 59-77. ill; 1990 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Aseptic state; Sterilization;
 Surgical operations; Facilities; Veterinary equipment
 
 
 405                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 The problem of foraging in captive callitrichid primates:
 behavioral time budgets and foraging skills.
 Molzen, E.M.; French, J.A.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 89-101.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Callithricidae; Primates; Capture of animals;
 Foraging; Animal housing; Animal behavior; Animal feeding
 
 
 406                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Problems that limit or complicate breeding transgenic mice.
 Donnelly, T.M.; Walsh-Mullen, A.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1991 Mar.
 Lab animal v. 20 (3): p. 34-35; 1991 Mar.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Transgenics; Animal breeding
 
 
 407                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Progesterone as a predictor of cyclicity in Bolivian squirrel
 monkeys during the breeding season.
 Aksel, S.; Diamond, E.J.; Hazelton, J.; Wiebe, R.H.; Abee,
 C.R. Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Feb. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (1): p.
 54-57. ill; 1985 Feb.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Squirrel monkeys; Breeding season; Progesterone;
 Estradiol
 
 
 408                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Prolapsus vaginae in the IIIVO/JU rabbit.
 Herck, H. van; Hesp, A.P.M.; Versluis, A.; Zwart, P.; Zutphen,
 L.F.M. van London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989
 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (4): p. 333-336. ill; 1989 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Vaginal prolapse; Inbred lines; Genetic
 defects
 
 Abstract:  In a specified pathogen free (SPF) breeding colony
 of IIIVO/JU rabbits 8 cases of prolapsus vaginae occurred in 5
 years. Clinically the animals were in shock. Haematocrits
 ranged from 9 to 15%. The prolapses started from the
 submucosal layer of the proximal part of the vestibulum
 vaginae. The prolapsed tissue consisted of over-expanded
 blood-sinuses. Between the sinuses signs of an inflammatory
 reaction were present. All 8 animals were in a period of
 increasing sexual activity when the prolapse developed. The 8
 rabbits were closely related, indicating a possible hereditary
 defect.
 
 
 409                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 Promoting psychological well-being in a biomedical research
 facility: sheep in wolves' clothing.
 Petto, A.J.; Russell, K.; Watson, L.; Lareau-Alves, M.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals; 1992.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 6: p. 366-370; 1992. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Laboratory mammals; Animal welfare
 
 
 410                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Promoting safety in a laboratory animal facility.
 Lukas, V.; Charron, D.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1993 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 22 (2): p. 22-25, 27-29; 1993 Feb.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratories; Safety at work
 
 
 411                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 A prototype rhesus cage to satisfy the needs of the home
 office, research, the animal technician and most importantly
 the monkey.
 Applebee, K.A.; Marshall, P.E.; McNab, A.M.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (1): p. 23-38; 1991 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Cages; Design; Prototypes; Animal
 welfare
 
 Abstract:  The publication in early 1989 of the Code of
 Practice for the Housing and Care of Animals Used in
 Scientific Procedures, enabled United Medical and Dental
 Schools to order a prototype primate cage to house principally
 Rhesus monkeys (M. mullata). The design of this cage and the
 lessons we have learned will enable us to improve on present
 facilities and, it is anticipated, to help relieve the stress
 and boredom which so often occurs when primates are kept in
 captivity.
 
 
 412                                   NAL Call. No.: SF601.C66
 Providing environmental enrichment to captive primates.
 Bayne, K.
 Trenton, N.J. : Veterinary Learning Systems Company, Inc; 1991
 Nov. The Compendium on continuing education for the practicing
 veterinarian v. 13 (11): p. 1689-1692, 1694-1695; 1991 Nov. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Laboratory mammals; Animal welfare;
 Animal behavior; Abnormal behavior; Environmental factors;
 Animal housing; Social environment; Toys; Visual stimuli;
 Sounds; Locomotion; Feeding behavior; Literature reviews
 
 
 413                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Provision of environmentally enriched housing for cats.
 Loveridge, G.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1994 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technicians v. 45 (2): p. 69-87; 1994 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cats; Animal housing; Environment; Enrichment;
 Design; Animal husbandry; Socialization; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  This paper describes the philosophy and design
 incorporated into the construction and operation of cat
 buildings in a centre that houses both dogs' and cats in the
 most animal friendly conditions providing maximum
 environmental interest to the pet consistent with the
 requirements of nutritional and behavioural studies. The
 husbandry systems use best health care practices, with
 emphasis on canine or feline companionship and the human pet
 relationships.
 
 
 414                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Psychological enrichment techniques and new world monkey
 restraint device reduce colony management time.
 Moseley, J.R.; Davis, J.A.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1989 Oct.
 Lab animal v. 18 (7): p. 31-33. ill; 1989 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Mental stress; Restraint of animals
 
 
 415                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Psychological well-being of captive primates: general
 considerations and examples from callitrichids.
 Snowdon, C.T.; Savage, A.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 75-88;
 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Callithricidae; Primates; Capture of
 animals; Psychological factors; Environment; Cages; Animal
 welfare
 
 
 416                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Psychological well-being of nocturnal primates in captivity.
 Wright, P.C.; Haring, D.M.; Izard, M.K.; Simons, E.L.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 61-74.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cebidae; Monkeys; Capture of animals; Cages;
 Environment; Natural history; Social behavior; Reproductive
 behavior; Animal welfare; Diets
 
 
 417                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1I43
 Psychological well-being of primates in captivity.
 Novak, M.A.; Suomi, S.J.
 Washington, D.C. : Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources,
 National Research Council; 1989.
 I.L.A.R. news v. 31 (3): p. 5-14. ill; 1989.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal welfare; Animal housing; Cages
 
 
 418                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 Q fever control measures: recommendations for research
 facilities using sheep. Bernard, K.W.; Parham, G.L.; Winkler,
 W.G.; Helmick, C.G. Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag;
 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 89-96; 1985. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sheep; Animal experiments; Facilities; Q fever;
 Disease control; Zoonoses
 
 
 419                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.H8
 Quantitatively tested environmental enrichment options for
 singly-caged nonhuman primates: a review.
 Reinhardt, V.; Reinhardt, A.
 Washington Grove, MD : Psychologists for the Ethical Treatment
 of Animals; 1992.
 Humane innovations and alternatives v. 6: p. 374-383; 1992. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Laboratory mammals; Cages; Animal
 welfare
 
 
 420                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Rabbit encephalitozoonosis in Kenya.
 Wesonga, H.O.; Munda, M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1992 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 26 (3): p. 219-221; 1992 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Kenya; Rabbits; Encephalitozoon cuniculi;
 Histopathology; Brain; Cerebellum; Kidneys; Case reports
 
 Abstract:  Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection was diagnosed in
 a laboratory rabbit breeding colony at Muguga, Kenya. This is
 the first report of the disease in rabbits in Kenya. Post-
 mortem examination showed gross renal lesions and the presence
 of the parasite in histological sections of the cerebrum and
 cerebellum. On Gram stain, spores were observed in the kidney
 sections.
 
 
 421                                  NAL Call. No.: SF601.V523
 Rabbit husbandry and medicine.
 Harkness, J.E.
 Philadelphia, Pa. : W.B. Saunders Company; 1987 Sep.
 The Veterinary clinics of North America : Small animal
 practice v. 17 (5): p. 1019-1044. ill; 1987 Sep.  In the
 series analytic: Exotic pet medicine / edited by J.E.
 Harkness.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Animal husbandry; Cages; Reproduction;
 Rabbit feeding; Disease prevention; Rabbit diseases
 
 
 422                                NAL Call. No.: Slide no.381
 Rabbits care and management in a laboratory setting.. 
 Rabbits, care and managment in a laboratory setting
 Harwell, James F.; Pucak, George
 University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational Resources Seattle, WA : Produced and distributed
 by University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational Resources,; 1990.
 47 slides : col. + 1 sound cassette (20 min.) + 1 guide.
 (Laboratory animal medicine and science. Series 2 ; V-9002). 
 Publication date on guide: 1991. Sound accompaniment
 compatible for manual and automatic operation.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits as laboratory animals; Laboratory
 animals; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  Covers importance of the environment, writing
 procedures for care and management to comply with the Animal
 Welfare Act and the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory
 Animals.
 
 
 423                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Rapid diagnosis and management of parainfluenza I virus
 infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).
 Sutherland, S.D.; Almeida, J.D.; Gardner, P.S.; Skarpa, M.;
 Stanton, J. London : Laboratory Animal Science Association;
 1986 Apr. Laboratory animals v. 20 (2): p. 121-126. ill; 1986
 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Paramyxoviridae; Serological diagnosis;
 Histopathology
 
 
 424                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Rationalization and computerization of the drug supply to an
 animal unit. Wootton, R.; Henderson, F.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (4): p. 283-288. ill; 1987 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal experiments; Drugs;
 Pharmacy; Management; Computer applications; Stock accounting
 
 Abstract:  Drug stocks in an animal unit were rationalized by
 discarding out-of-date or unwanted items and drawing up an
 approved stock list. A computerized system of stock control
 which enables a regular and accurate inventory of
 pharmaceuticals to be made was then established. In addition,
 the paperwork required for reordering drugs is produced
 automatically. Pharmaceuticals to a total value of 1650 pounds
 were discarded during the rationalization phase. The value of
 drugs stocked in the animal unit then stabilized at about one-
 third of previous levels. In the first 6 months of operation
 of the new system drug expenditure fell by about 40% in
 comparison with the same period 1 year previously. The drug
 stock control system has proved economical to operate and
 accurate, and can be run by persons without computer
 expertise. Valuable savings in both cost and labour have
 resulted. Effective management of drug expenditure by the
 animal unit is now possible.
 
 
 425                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Rearing a second generation of cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus
 oedipus oedipus) in captivity.
 Kirkwood, J.K.; Epstein, M.A.; Terlecki, A.J.; Underwood, S.J.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1985 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 19 (4): p. 269-272. ill; 1985 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal breeding; Callithricidae; Endangered
 species; Mortality; Parturition
 
 
 426                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Rearing and maintenance of the Australian anuran Limnodynastes
 tasmaniensis, under laboratory conditions.
 Chapman, J.E.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1987 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 38 (3): p. 175-182. ill; 1987 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Australia; Frogs; Laboratory rearing; Facilities;
 Animal housing; Animal breeding; Anesthesia; Euthanasia
 
 Abstract:  Methods are described for rearing and maintaining
 in the laboratory the anuran Limnodynastes tasmaniensis. It is
 necessary to provide a range of live foods for adults and to
 ensure high water quality for all growth stages. The frog does
 not hibernate and breeds throughout the year in the
 laboratory, making it an excellent subject for experimental
 research.
 
 
 427                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.R42 1985
 Recommendations for governance and management of institutional
 animal resources.
 Joint AAMC-AAU Ad Hoc Committee on the Governance and
 Management of Institutional Animal Resources, Association of
 American Medical Colleges, Association of American
 Universities
 Washington, D.C. : Association of American Medical Colleges :
 Association of American Universities,; 1985.
 9 p. ; 24 cm.  Cover title.  October, 1985.  Includes
 bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals
 
 
 428                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Recrudescence of Entopolypoides macaci Mayer, 1933,
 (Babesiidae) infection secondary to stress in long-tailed
 macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Emerson, C.L.; Tsai, C.C.;
 Holland, C.J.; Ralston, P.; Diluzio, M.E. Cordova, Tenn. :
 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science; 1990 Mar.
 Laboratory animal science v. 40 (2): p. 169-171. ill; 1990
 Mar.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca fascicularis; Entopolypoides; Protozoal
 infections; Stress; Relapse; Immunofluorescence
 
 Abstract:  Parasites were found in red blood cells of two
 long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) imported from
 Indonesia and housed in the Washington Regional Primate
 Research Center breeding colony for 7 years or longer. Both
 macaques developed parasitemias secondary to stress (type D
 retrovirus in one case and severe trauma in the other).
 Entopolypoides macaci (Babesiidae) was diagnosed on the basis
 of morphology from peripheral blood smears stained with
 Wright's stain. Antibodies against Babesia sp. were detected
 by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) from one infected macaque,
 which showed antibody cross-reactions (high titer) to B.
 bigemina, B. bovis, B. canis, and (low titers) to Plasmodium
 falciparum. Five feral long-tailed macaques that had been
 imported recently from the same country had no detectable
 antibodies. This is the first report of IFA as an aid to
 diagnose E. macaci in nonhuman primates.
 
 
 429                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Rederivation of MHV and MEV antibody positive mice by cross-
 fostering and use of the microisolator caging system.
 Lipman, N.S.; Newcomer, C.E.; Fox, J.G.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (2): p.
 195-199. ill; 1987 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Barrier husbandry; Viral hepatitis; Encephalitis;
 Mice; Cages; Specific pathogen-free state; Isolation
 
 
 430                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.J55
 Reduced fertility in gracile axonal dystrophy (gad) mice.
 Yamazaki, K.; Wakasugi, N.; Sakakibara, A.; Tomita, T.
 Tokyo : Keio University School of Medicine; 1988 Apr.
 Jikken dobutsu; experimental animals v. 37 (2): p. 195-199;
 1988 Apr. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Female animals; Female fertility; Crosses;
 Litter size; Fetal death; Breeding efficiency; Strains
 
 
 431                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Reference blood values of iron metabolism in cynomolgus
 macaques. Giulietti, M.; La Torre, R.; Pace, M.; Iale, E.;
 Patella, A.; Turillazzi, P. Cordova, Tenn. : American
 Association for Laboratory Animal Science; 1991 Dec.
 Laboratory animal science v. 41 (6): p. 606-608; 1991 Dec. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca fascicularis; Iron; Mineral metabolism;
 Blood; Normal values; Reference standards; Sex differences
 
 Abstract:  Iron deficiency anemia is a human health problem of
 global significance, particularly as it affects pregnant women
 and infants. While the study of nonhuman primates has resulted
 in valuable knowledge about iron metabolism, hematologic and
 biochemical reference ranges for the parameters of iron
 metabolism are difficult to document in healthy monkeys. At
 our institution, we maintain a large breeding colony of
 healthy cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Data
 compiled after sampling nonpregnant females and male members
 of this colony are presented as reference ranges for red cell
 number, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, mean
 cellular hemoglobin, mean cellular hemoglobin concentration,
 serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, serum transferrin,
 and serum ferritin.
 
 
 432                                   NAL Call. No.: RA1190.F8
 Refinement of animal research technique and validity of
 research data. Rowan, A.N.
 Duluth, Minn. : Academic Press; 1990 Jul.
 Fundamental and applied toxicology : official journal of the
 Society of Toxicology v. 15 (1): p. 25-32; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal welfare; Research; Environmental factors;
 Animal housing
 
 
 433                               NAL Call. No.: QP1.A2 SUPPL.
 Regulation of animal experimentation in Sweden.
 Skoglund, E.
 Stockholm : Blackwell Scientific Publications; 1986.
 Acta physiologica Scandinavica v. 128 (554): p. 153-157; 1986. 
 Paper presented at the "Second CFN Symposium on the Ethics of
 Animal Experimentation," August 12-14, 1985, Stockholm,
 Sweden.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Sweden; Animal experiments; Legislation; Ethics;
 Animal housing; Regulations
 
 
 434                                 NAL Call. No.: RA565.A1E54
 Relationship of dietary lodide and drinking water
 disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals.
 Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Holdsworth, G.
 Research Triangle Park, N.C. : National Institute of
 Environmental Health Sciences; 1986 Nov.
 E H P Environmental health perspectives v. 69: p. 243-248;
 1986 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigeons; Rabbits; Diet; Iodides; Drinking water;
 Disinfectants; Thyroid gland
 
 
 435                                  NAL Call. No.: QD415.A1X4
 Report of the Validation and Technology Transfer committee of
 the Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing.
 Framework for validation and implementation of in vitro
 toxicity tests.
 Goldberg, A.M.; Frazier, J.M.; Brusick, D.; Dickens, M.S.;
 Flint, O.; Gettings, S.D.; Hill, R.N.; Lipnick, R.L.;
 Renskers, K.J.; Bradlaw, J.A. London : Taylor &amp; Francis, 1971-
 ; 1993 May.
 Xenobiotica v. 23 (5): p. 563-572; 1993 May.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: In vitro; Animal models; In vitro culture;
 Methodology
 
 Abstract:  The development and application of in vitro
 alternatives designed to reduce or replace the use of animals,
 or to lessen the distress and discomfort of laboratory
 animals, is a rapidly developing trend in toxicology. However,
 at present there is no formal administrative process to
 organize, coordinate, or evaluate validation activities. A
 framework capable of fostering the validation of new methods
 is essential for the effective transfer of new technological
 developments from the research laboratory into practical use.
 This committee has identified four essential validation
 resources: chemical bank(s), cell and tissue banks, a data
 bank, and reference laboratories. The creation of a Scientific
 Advisory Board composed of experts in the various aspects and
 endpoints of toxicity testing, and representing the academic,
 industrial and regulatory communities, is recommended. Test
 validation acceptance is contingent upon broad buy-in by
 disparate groups in the scientific community--academics,
 industry and government. This is best achieved by early and
 frequent communication among parties and agreement upon common
 goals. It is hoped that the creation of a validation
 infrastructure composed of the elements described in this
 report will facilitate scientific acceptance and utilization
 of alternative methodologies and speed implementation of
 replacement, reduction and refinement alternatives in toxicity
 testing.
 
 
 436                                NAL Call. No.: SF407.F39B56
 Reproduction, breeding, and growth.
 Fox, J.G.
 Philadelphia : Lea &amp; Febiger; 1988.
 Biology and diseases of the ferret / [edited by] James G. Fox.
 p. 174-183. ill; 1988.  Literature review.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Ferrets; Reproduction; Animal breeding; Growth
 
 
 437                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Reproduction, development and physiology of the gray short-
 tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica).
 Kraus, D.B.; Fadem, B.H.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (4): p.
 478-482; 1987 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Opossums; Reproduction; Breeding methods;
 Developmental stages; Physiology; Laboratory rearing
 
 
 438                               NAL Call. No.: QL737.P925H36
 Reproductive cyclicity and breeding in the squirrel monkey.
 Dukelow, W.R.
 New York : Plenum Press; 1985.
 Handbook of squirrel monkey research / edited by Leonard A.
 Rosenblum and Christopher L. Coe. p. 169-190. ill; 1985. 
 Literature review.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Squirrel monkeys; Reproduction; Estrous cycle;
 Ovulation; Fertilization; Artificial insemination; Pregnancy
 
 
 439                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Reproductive performance in C57BL and I strain mice.
 Hoover-Plow, J.; Elliott, P.; Moynier, B.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (5): p.
 595-602; 1988 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Strains; Reproductive performance; Animal
 breeding; Laboratory rearing
 
 
 440                                  NAL Call. No.: HV4701.A45
 Researching your local research facility.
 Budkie, M.A.
 Monroe, Conn. : Animal Rights Network; 1990 Oct.
 The Animals' agenda v. 10 (8): p. 16-18. ill; 1990 Oct.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Research institutes; Animal experiments; Research
 projects; Data collection
 
 
 441                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Research-oriented genetic management of nonhuman primate
 colonies. Williams-Blangero, S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (6): p.
 535-540; 1993 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Animal breeding; Animal experiments;
 Genetic variation; Pedigree; Genetic markers; Quantitative
 traits; Heritability
 
 Abstract:  Genetic management is an important component of the
 general management of nonhuman primate colonies. However,
 standard genetic management techniques were developed
 primarily to address the goals of population conservation,
 particularly in zoo situations. The special needs of colonies
 that produce animals for biomedical research have not
 previously been fully addressed and the great potential of
 genetic management in the research environment remains to be
 realized. A research-oriented genetic management approach
 balances long-term breeding goals and current and future
 experimental needs, yielding a comprehensive overall colony
 management program. Pedigree information, genetic markers
 (e.g., serum proteins, red blood cell enzymes, restriction
 fragment length polymorphisms, and single-locus
 microsatellites), and quantitative traits (e.g., routinely
 gathered clinical chemical values, weights, and blood
 pressures) can be used alone or in combination to estimate
 genetic variability in the colony and to characterize animals
 for experimentally relevant traits. The statistical power of
 experiments using nonhuman primates can be improved when
 animals are selected on the basis of their genetic values or
 genotypes for experimentally relevant traits because the
 quantified genetic variation among subjects can then be
 minimized. The incorporation of experimental needs into the
 overall genetic management plans for captive breeding colonies
 helps ensure the long-term viability of colonies for meeting
 the demands of both breeding and research.
 
 
 442                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Resolving issues of psychological well-being and management of
 laboratory nonhuman primates.
 Bayne, K.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 27-39;
 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Primates; Laboratory rearing; Animal
 experiments; Animal welfare; Surveys; Research institutes
 
 
 443                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Response of adult New Zealand white rabbits to enrichment
 objects and paired housing.
 Huls, W.L.; Brooks, D.L.; Bean-Knudsen, D.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Dec. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (6): p.
 609-612; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Animal welfare; Cages; Enrichment;
 Social behavior
 
 Abstract:  Enhancing the psychological well-being of
 laboratory animals has received much attention recently.
 Although many studies have been undertaken to determine the
 effects of cage enrichment techniques on dogs and nonhuman
 primates, other than scant empirical observations, little has
 been done to measure these events objectively in lagomorphs.
 We studied adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits to
 learn if, when given the opportunity, individual rabbits would
 use different enrichment objects placed in their cages, and to
 determine if rabbits preferred to be in proximity to one
 another, or apart. Three different objects were evaluated with
 eight rabbits individually housed in conventional cages. Each
 object introduced into individual rabbit cages stimulated
 substantial interaction, especially chewing behavior. Eight
 other rabbits were pair-housed in a modified caging system
 with a special access port between two separate cages. When
 given a choice, rabbits preferred to be in the same cage with
 other rabbits. In both studies, individual behaviors were
 monitored, as well as either the type of interaction and
 percentage of observations spent with each object or, in the
 housing study, percentage of observations involved with
 different types of activity, and relative location of the
 paired rabbits.
 
 
 444                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Responses of female rhesus macaques to an environmental en
 richment apparatus. Line, S.W.; Clarke, A.S.; Markowitz, H.;
 Ellman, G.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1990 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 24 (3): p. 213-220; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Environment; Enrichment
 
 Abstract:  Environmental enrichment devices are a potential
 way to enhance psychological well-being in laboratory animals.
 The effects of such devices need to be systematically
 evaluated before they are recommended for widespread use. The
 purpose of this research was to monitor the behavioural and
 physiological responses of adult female rhesus macaques to a
 simple enrichment device. The apparatus consisted of a box
 attached to the monkey's home cage that contained a radio and
 a food dispenser, which could be controlled by the monkeys via
 contact detectors. Radio and food dispenser use were
 automatically recorded. Whole blood serotonin (WBS), plasma
 cortisol and abnormal behaviour were measured in 5 monkeys
 before, during and after a 20-week period in which the
 monkey's cages were equipped with the device. All monkeys used
 the device (3 of the 5 subjects earned an average of more than
 200 food pellets per day). Mean plasma cortisol and whole
 blood serotonin did not differ across sampling times,
 suggesting that the apparatus had no effect on basal stress
 levels. There was an inverse relationship between apparatus
 use and cortisol levels in 76% of the samples, but only 3 of
 17 coefficients were significant. There was a significant but
 small negative correlation between apparatus use and self-
 abusive behaviour. This enrichment device was readily used by
 adult rhesus monkeys and could be adapted for use in a wide
 variety of laboratory settings.
 
 
 445                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A restraint system for the common marmoset (Callithrix
 jacchus). O'Byrne, K.T.; Morris, K.D.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1988 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 22 (2): p. 148-150. ill; 1988 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marmoset; Restraint; Facilities; Equipment; Blood
 specimen collection
 
 Abstract:  A method for restraining the marmoset in a primate
 chair is described. The device is inexpensive to construct, is
 reliable, and the majority of animals can be habituated to its
 use. The chair has been used in neurobiological studies
 employing electrophysiological recordings, with or without
 concurrent collection of serial blood samples.
 
 
 446                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Retinal cyclic light damage threshold for albino rats.
 Semple-Rowland, S.L.; Dawson, W.W.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (3): p.
 289-298. ill; 1987 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Cages; Lighting; Light intensity; Retinas;
 Damage
 
 
 447                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Rigid plastic balls as enrichment devices for captive
 chimpanzees. Bloomsmith, M.A.; Finlay, T.W.; Merhalski, J.J.;
 Maple, T.L. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1990 May. Laboratory animal science
 v. 40 (3): p. 319-322; 1990 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzees; Environment; Enrichment; Toys; Play;
 Sex differences; Age differences; Animal housing
 
 Abstract:  The use of rigid, plastic balls as enrichment
 devices for 16 captive chimpanzees was studied at The
 University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center chimpanzee
 colony. After the subjects were presented with balls, 10 hours
 of data were collected for each subject using a scan-sampling
 technique. The mean percentage of ball-use time for all
 subjects during the study was 7.1%. There was no sex
 difference in ball use. Age and housing effects were obtained,
 with younger animals and those housed in more barren
 environments exhibiting higher levels of ball use. It is
 concluded that the balls were worthwhile additions to the
 chimpanzee environments with use stabilizing at a mean of 2.5%
 of the subjects' time.
 
 
 448                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Ringtail in the pouched mouse (Saccostomus campestris).
 Ellison, G.T.H.; Westlin-Van Aarde, L.M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1990 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 24 (3): p. 205-206; 1990 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Tail; Animal diseases; Relative humidity
 
 Abstract:  Laboratory colonies of the pouched mouse
 (Saccostomus campestris) were housed in solid bottom cages and
 fed a varied diet containing excess fatty acids. Ringtail was
 only initiated in animals of all ages, from populations
 originating from different areas of South Africa, when the
 relative humidity fell below 30%. The incidence of ringtail
 was curtailed by maintaining relative humidity above 45% in
 animal houses.
 
 
 449                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The rinkhals (Hemachatus haemachatus) a southern African
 venomous snake--housing, husbandry and maintenance.
 Dawson, P.; Alexander, G.J.; Nicholls, S.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (2): p. 71-76; 1991 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Elapidae; Animal housing; Animal husbandry
 
 
 450                        NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.967
 Rodents basic needs, handling and care.
 Hamm, Thomas E.
 American College of Toxicology, Meeting_1990 :_Orlando,
 Fla.),Production Plus, Inc
 Symposium: Animal Welfare Compliance for Study Directors 1990
 : Orlando, Fla. Closter, N.J. : Production Plus, Inc.,
 [1990?]; 1990.
 1 videocassette (18 min., 21 sec.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  VHS. 
 Videotape of a presentation at Symposium: Animal Welfare
 Compliance for Study Directors; presented at the Eleventh
 Annual Meeting of the American College of Toxicology, Orlando,
 Fla., Oct. 1990.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rodents as laboratory animals; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  Training video for research personnel which
 includes a discussion of animal shipping, identification,
 viral disease monitoring, confinement caging, water, bedding
 and environment for rodents. Guidelines for determining when
 euthanasia is appropriate are provided.
 
 
 451                             NAL Call. No.: SF105.W693 1986
 The role of computer simulation and laboratory animals in the
 design of breeding programs.
 Harris, D.L.; Stewart, T.S.
 Lincoln : University of Nebraska, Institute of Agriculture and
 Natural Resources; 1986.
 3rd World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production
 : July 16-22, 1986 / editors: G.E. Dickerson and R.K. Johnson.
 v. 4 p. 251-268; 1986. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Breeding programs; Systems analysis
 
 
 452                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 A room with a view for captive primates: issues, goals,
 related research and strategies.
 O'Neill, P.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 135-160.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cercopithecidae; Capture of animals; Cages;
 Medical research; Environment; Animal housing; Social
 behavior; Psychoses
 
 
 453                                NAL Call. No.: aHV4701.A952
 S.544.
 Heflin, H.
 Beltsville, Md. : National Agricultural Library, AWIC; 1992
 Jul. Animal Welfare Information Center newsletter v. 3 (3): p.
 1, 7-8; 1992 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Animal experiments; Legislation
 
 
 454                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 A safe and easy way to pick up B6C3F1 mice from wire-bottom
 cages. Quezada, A.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1994 Jul.
 Lab animal v. 23 (7): p. 53; 1994 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Handling
 
 
 455                        NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.749
 Safe use of pesticides and disinfectants in the poultry
 industry produced by Office of Pesticide Information and
 Coordination, Integrated Pest Management Education and
 Publications, UC Statewide IPM Project, University of
 California, Davis ; videotaped and edited by Visual Media,
 Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, UC, Davis.
 University of California, Davis, Visual Media, University of
 California, Davis, Office of Pesticide Information and
 Coordination
 Davis, CA : Visual Media, [1989?]; 1989.
 1 videocassette (25 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in.  VHS.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Poultry; Housing; Disinfection; Safety measures;
 Disinfection and disinfectants; Safety measures; Pesticides;
 Safety measures; Veterinary disinfection; Safety measures
 
 Abstract:  This videocassette, designed to provide general
 training for poultry workers, discusses the safe use of
 pesticides in and around poultry houses and processing plants.
 It focuses on disinfectants. The program explains the
 significance of labels and signal words; the three ways
 pesticides enter the body, through inhalation, ingestion, and
 absorption; how to use and maintain protective clothing and
 equipment, properly apply pesticides, properly dispose of
 containers, handle pesticide spills, recognize pesticide
 poisoning symptoms, handle medical emergencies, and avoid
 overexposure of applicators by periodic blood analysis for
 cholinesterase level. Preventing bird poisonong and avoiding
 illegal pesticide residues are addressed. Formaldehyde and
 herbicides are covered. Insecticides, miticides, insect baits
 and sprays, and rodenticides are mentioned as pesticides used
 in the poultry industry.
 
 
 456                                  NAL Call. No.: Z7994.L3A5
 Salvation or extinction of the chimpanzee: the final struggle
 begins?. Nottingham : Fund for the Replacement of Animals in
 Medical Experiments; 1988 Mar.
 Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA v. 15 (3): p.
 176-179; 1988 Mar. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzee; Laboratory animals; Animal welfare;
 Animal housing; Wildlife conservation; Endangered species
 
 
 457                                      NAL Call. No.: Q1.S37
 Scientists doubtful about new law aiming to protect animal
 research facilities.
 Kaufman, R.
 Philadelphia, Pa. : Institute for Scientific Information; 1992
 Oct26. The scientist v. 6 (21): p. 1, 5; 1992 Oct26.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal welfare; Animal experiments; Legislation;
 Vandalism
 
 
 458                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Screening rabbit colonies for antibodies to Pasteurella
 multocida by an ELISA. Zaoutis, T.E.; Reinhard, G.R.; Cioffe,
 C.J.; Moore, P.B.; Stark, D.M. Cordova, Tenn. : American
 Association for Laboratory Animal Science; 1991 Oct.
 Laboratory animal science v. 41 (5): p. 419-422; 1991 Oct. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Pasteurella multocida; Screening; Elisa;
 Immunodiagnosis; Serological surveys
 
 Abstract:  Rabbit serum samples from eleven different research
 facilities were evaluated for the presence of immunoglobulin G
 against Pasteurella multocida by using an enzyme-linked
 immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Each facility which submitted
 serum samples also provided a brief history of each rabbit
 colony tested. Rabbits from colonies reported to have endemic
 P. multocida or of undetermined status had 83 (58.9%) of 141
 rabbits that were positive. Colonies reported to be free from
 P. multocida had 110 (92.4%) of 119 rabbits that were negative
 by ELISA. The ELISA test described here showed a high degree
 of agreement (92-94%) with two other P. multocida ELISAs at
 different diagnostic facilities. This study confirms that an
 ELISA testing for serum antibodies against the P. multocida is
 a reliable diagnostic tool to screen colonies for P.
 multocida.
 
 
 459                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Security in the research laboratory. 2. Communications,
 personnel and publicity.
 Clifford, D.H.; Green, K.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 Apr.
 Lab animal v. 15 (3): p. 23-24, 28-29. ill; 1986 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal husbandry; Security;
 Animal housing; Research institutes; Public relations;
 Personnel
 
 
 460                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Security in the research laboratory. I. Perimeter and internal
 control. Green, K.A.; Clifford, D.H.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1986 Mar.
 Lab animal v. 15 (2): p. 22-24, 27-28, 31, 34, 36. ill; 1986
 Mar.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Security; Animal research; Research institutes;
 Laboratories; Facilities
 
 
 461                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Semen characteristics of vervet monkeys.
 Seier, J.V.; Fincham, J.E.; Menkveld, R.; Venter, F.S.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (1): p. 43-47; 1989 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cercopithecidae; Monkeys; Electroejaculation;
 Semen characters
 
 Abstract:  Semen samples (91) from 47 vervet monkeys were
 collected by electroejaculation over a 2 year period. Seventy-
 eight of these were from 37 singly caged males of unknown
 fertility and 13 from 10 breeding males of known fertility.
 Mean values for semen characteristics of the singly caged
 males were: volume 0.45 ml, pH 7.8, concentration 184 X
 10(6)/ml, forward progression rating 2.95 (scale 0-4),
 motility 55.4%, live 68% and abnormal morphology 3.5%. Mean
 values for semen characteristics for the breeding males were:
 volume 0.86 ml, pH 9.00, concentration 117.15 X 10(6)/ml,
 forward progression rating 3.00 (scale 0-4), motility 43.6%,
 live 53.3% and abnormal morphology 6%. Semen volumes in the
 singly caged males were lower than the volumes reported in
 other studies.
 
 
 462                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.F43 1987
 Serological following of a laboratory rat breeding
 contaminated with respiratory viruses during 1981-1986.
 Pribylova, M.; Svoboda, T.; Klir, P.
 Dordrecht : M. Nijhoff; 1988.
 New developments in biosciences : their implications for
 laboratory animal science : proceedings of the Third
 Symposium, Amsterdam, The Nethrlands, 1-5 June 1987 / edited
 by Anton C. Beyneen and Henk A. Solleveld. p. 379-384. ill;
 1988.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Laboratory rearing; Contamination;
 Respiratory diseases; Viruses; Serological diagnosis;
 Histopathology; Isolation
 
 
 463                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Sex ratio and litter size in relation to parity and mode of
 conception in three inbred strains in mice.
 Krackow, S.; Gruber, F.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1990 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 24 (4): p. 345-352; 1990 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Sex ratio; Litter size; Conception; Estrus;
 Postpartum interval; Anestrus; Parous rates
 
 Abstract:  Breeding records from three inbred strains of mice
 (BALB/c ABom, C57BL/10ScSn, C3H/He/Kon) were examined with
 respect to the effects of parity and mode of conception upon
 litter size and sex ratio at birth. Litters from 3 modes of
 conception were considered: litters of primipares, litters of
 multipares conceived during postpartum oestrus and litters
 conceived after lactational anoestrus. Litters of multipares
 were assigned to one of these latter groups according to the
 inter-litter intervals. Parity had no significant effect upon
 the sex ratio but had a significant one upon the litter size,
 which did not vary between the strains when first litters were
 excluded from analysis. The expected variations in response to
 the mode of conception were found in BALB/c ABom mice but both
 the effects on the Utter size as well as on the sex ratio
 varied significantly between the strains. Litter size
 reduction per se could be ruled out to be the cause of the sex
 ratio variations found. Rather, it is suggested that sex-
 specificity of embryonic loss depends upon the mode of
 conception.
 
 
 464                                     NAL Call. No.: 410 B77
 Sexual selection for spatial-learning ability.
 Gaulin, S.J.C.; Fitzgerald, R.W.
 London : Bailliere Tindall; 1989 Feb.
 Animal behaviour v. 37 (2): p. 322-331. ill; 1989 Feb. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Microtus; Rodents; Sex differences; Learning
 ability; Ranges; Size; Cage size; Laboratory methods
 
 Abstract:  Sex differences in spatial learning have been
 thought to be universal among mammals, but their adaptive
 significance has been neglected. Spatial-learning skills are
 hypothesized to evolve in proportion to nagivational demands,
 and it is predicted that sex differences in spatial ability
 will evolve only in species where range expansion contributes
 differentially to the reproductive success of males and
 females. This prediction was tested via field studies of
 ranging behaviour and laboratory studies of spatial ability in
 two congeneric rodent species whose mating systems differ.
 Radiotelemetric studies showed that, in a polygynous species
 (meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus) males expanded their
 ranges only during the breeding season and only when they
 attained full reproductive status. Females showed neither
 response. This suggests that range expansion was a male
 reproductive tactic. In contrast, a monogamous congener
 (prairie voles, M. ochrogaster) showed no sex differences in
 ranging, regardless of reproductive status. This probably
 reflects the relative inability of monogamous males and
 females to benefit from increased exposure to members of the
 opposite sex. When subsequently tested in a series of seven
 symmetrical mazes, subjects from the field studies exhibited
 the predicted sex-by-species patterns of spatial ability: only
 meadow voles showed consistent male superiority on these
 spatial tasks.
 
 
 465                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The Siconbrec project--conditioning and breeding facilities
 for the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) in the
 Philippines: a review after the first five years.
 Hobbs, K.R.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (1): p. 55-64. ill., maps; 1989 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Philippines; Macaca; Facilities; Breeding
 programs; Exports
 
 Abstract:  Five years after its establishment in the
 Philippines, the Siconbrec project has made rapid and
 effective progress in establishing large-scale breeding
 programms to produce Macaca fascicularis for biomedical
 purposes. If the current rate of expansion is continued, the
 need to use wild-trapped monkeys from the Philippines will
 decline to a point where few should be required for export by
 the mid 1990s.
 
 
 466                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Signs of enrichment toward the psychological well-being of
 chimpanzees. Fouts, R.S.; Abshire, M.L.; Bodamer, M.; Fouts,
 D.H.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 376-388;
 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Chimpanzee; Animal welfare; Cage size; Exercise;
 Habitats; Social interaction; Facilities
 
 
 467                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 The simian-type M and the human-type ABO blood groups in the
 African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops): their
 inheritance, distribution and significance for the management
 of a breeding colony.
 Terao, K.; Hiyaoka, A.; Cho, F.; Honjo, S.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1988 Oct.
 Laboratory animals v. 22 (4): p. 347-354; 1988 Oct.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cercopithecidae; Blood groups; Genetics;
 Inheritance; Animal breeding
 
 Abstract:  We have established a new simian-type blood group
 system (M blood groups) in the African green monkey
 (Cercopithecus aethiops), using a haemagglutinating antibody
 which was developed by alloimmunization. The M blood groups
 consisted of two phenotypes, type-M and type-m. We have also
 determined the mode of inheritance as well as the distribution
 of both simian-type M and human-type ABO blood groups,
 employing 113 families including 160 animals. The family
 analysis revealed that (1) the simian-type M blood groups were
 governed by the two alleles, dominant M and recessive m, and
 (2) the human-type ABO blood groups were governed by 3
 alleles, codominant A and B and silent O, although no monkey
 of phenotype-O was found in our breeding colony. Differences
 in the phenotypic distribution and gene frequency of
 respective M and ABO blood groups were observed among 3
 populations imported at different times. The genetic
 management of the African green monkey breeding colony was
 discussed in relation to the difference in distribution of
 phenotypes of M and ABO blood groups between the parental
 (wild-originated) and the first filial (colony-born)
 populations.
 
 
 468                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 A simple, cheap barrier system to upgrade the health status of
 a conventional rat breeding colony.
 Lewin, L.; Hansen, G.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1986 Aug.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 37 (2): p. 93-104. ill; 1986 Aug.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Animal health; Respiratory diseases;
 Bacteria; Disease prevention; Floors; Testing
 
 
 469                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A simple device for the objective measurement of activity.
 Chalain, T.M.B. de; Whitefield, D.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1991 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 25 (3): p. 212-215; 1991 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Activity; Measurement; Cages;
 Monitors
 
 Abstract:  The activity of small experimental animals is
 difficult to quantify without prolonged observation and note-
 taking. We describe a relatively cheap and easily constructed
 device for monitoring and recording activity. Appropriate
 modifications make the basic device suitable for limited field
 applications.
 
 
 470                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A simple method for the concurrent stimulation of skelton
 muscle in several animals.
 Rosenblatt, J.D.; Lin, P.J.; McKee, N.H.; Kuzon, W.M. Jr
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (4): p.
 347-348. ill; 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Skeletal muscle; Stimulation; Electricity;
 Methodology; Cages; Electrical equipment
 
 
 471                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Simple methods which maintain the barrier status of specific-
 pathogen-free animals during experimentation.
 Herbert, J.; Roser, B.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (2): p. 149-154. ill; 1987 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mice; Animal experiments; Specific pathogen
 free state; Equipment; Facilities
 
 
 472                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A simplified method for stress free continuous blood
 collection in large animals.
 Ladewig, J.; Stribrny, K.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (3): p.
 333-335. ill; 1988 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cattle; Pigs; Stress; Blood specimen collection;
 Catheters; Animal housing
 
 
 473                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Skeletal lesions and anemia associated with ascorbic acid
 deficiency in juvenile rhesus macaques.
 Eisele, P.H.; Morgan, J.P.; Line, A.S.; Anderson, J.H.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (3): p.
 245-249; 1992 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Macaca mulatta; Ascorbic acid;
 Vitamin deficiencies; Anemia; Bone diseases; Lameness;
 Symptoms; Diagnosis; Therapy; Vitamin supplements; Case
 reports
 
 Abstract:  Young rhesus macaques housed in outdoor corn cribs
 and fed a commercially prepared primate diet became weak,
 depressed, were reluctant to move, and expressed locomotor
 abnormalities. Thirteen severely affected animals were
 hospitalized for evaluation. Physical examination disclosed
 swellings and instabilities involving the ends of long bones.
 Radiography confirmed physeal fractures in 11 of 13 animals.
 Affected bones included the distal femur, proximal humerus,
 distal tibia/fibula, and distal radius/ulna. Other, less
 obvious changes were noted on radiographs. Anemia was a
 consistent finding. Ascorbic acid deficiency was suspected and
 therapy was initiated that consisted of vitamin supplements,
 diet change, cage rest, and support bandages. Feed samples
 were submitted to a laboratory for analysis and were confirmed
 deficient in vitamin C. Follow-up radiographs showed large
 calcifying subperiosteal hematomas in epiphyseometaphyseal
 regions, consistent with a diagnosis of scurvy. Twelve of 13
 animals recovered clinically. Subsequent radiographs
 documented improvement of initially severe angular deformities
 associated with displaced fractures.
 
 
 474                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Skills and responsibilities in laboratory management.
 Scher, S.
 New York : Media Horizons; 1985 May.
 Lab animal v. 14 (4): p. 43; 1985 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Laboratory animals; Technicians;
 Management; Skills; Responsibility
 
 
 475                            NAL Call. No.: SF774.5.J66 1985
 Smaller laboratory animals., 4th ed.
 Keeley, A.
 Oxford [Oxfordshire] : Pergamon Press; 1985.
 Jones's animal nursing / edited by D.R. Lane for the British
 Small Animal Veterinary Association, with contributions from
 twenty-six authors. p. 148-153. ill; 1985.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Environmental temperature;
 Cages; Animal housing; Animal feeding; Diets; Nursing
 
 
 476                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Social enrichment for aged rhesus monkeys that have lived
 singly for many years.
 Reinhardt, V.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1991 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 42 (3): p. 173-177; 1991 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Enrichment; Social environment;
 Aggressive behavior
 
 Abstract:  There is widespread concern that aged rhesus
 monkeys who have been housed singly for a long time would do
 better living alone than sharing a cage with a companion. Ten
 female and five male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) 22 to 33
 years old and deprived of physical contact with any other
 conspecific for more than 10 years, were socialised with
 weaned infants (11 pairs) or with each other (2 female--female
 pairs) using two standard methods of pairing. Pairing was
 associated with a total of 7 non-injurious aggressions during
 the first hour. Pairs were compatible (no visible signs of
 injury, adequate food sharing, no signs of depression) in
 every case throughout a one year follow-up period. The aged
 monkeys' body weight three weeks after pairing were not
 average 0.8% greater than one week before pairing, suggesting
 that their well-being was not jeopardised by the presence of a
 compatible companion. It was concluded that social enrichment
 can be achieved for old rhesus monkeys who have lived singly
 for many years without undue risks. The animal's high degree
 of social acceptance was taken as a sign of their inherent
 social disposition.
 
 
 477                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Social housing of monkeys and apes: group formations.
 Bernstein, I.S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (4): p.
 329-333; 1991 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Pongidae; Animal housing; Social
 structure; Groups
 
 
 478                                     NAL Call. No.: 410 B77
 Social influences on vigilance in rabbits.
 Roberts, S.C.
 London : Bailliere Tindall; 1988 Jun.
 Animal behaviour v. 36 (3): p. 905-913; 1988 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Social behavior; Social structure;
 Feeding behavior; Multiple regression
 
 Abstract:  The potential advantage of corporate vigilance to
 rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus, groups was studied in free-
 ranging rabbits that associated and cohabited basically in
 male-female 'consorting' pairs. Evening observations were
 conducted of rabbits during the breeding season. Levels of
 vigilance of an individual rabbit during feeding decreased
 with proximity to that rabbit's 'consort'. In contrast,
 rabbits increased their vigilance in the presence of greater
 numbers of non-consort rabbits either nearby or over 12 m
 away. An experiment using stuffed animals as stimulus objects
 indicated that the presence of a strange rabbit or of a fox
 increased the proportion of time that rabbits spent vigilant.
 Non-social factors also influenced vigilance and feeding. In
 particular, vigilance decreased as the evening proceeded and
 with higher temperature. For bucks only, it also decreased as
 the season advanced.
 
 
 479                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Social interaction in nonhuman primates: an underlying theme
 for primate research.
 Novak, M.A.; Suomi, S.J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (4): p.
 308-314; 1991 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Social interaction; Animal experiments;
 Animal housing; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  Social living is assumed to be a critical feature
 of nonhuman primate existence inasmuch as most primate species
 live in social groups in nature. Recent USDA legislation
 emphasizes the importance of social contact in promoting
 psychological well-being and recommends that laboratory
 primates be housed with companions when consistent with
 research protocols. Our goals were to examine the link between
 social housing and psychological well-being and to explore the
 idea that research may be compromised when primates are
 studied in environments that vary too greatly from their
 natural ecological setting (individual cage housing versus
 group housing). Three general points emerge from these
 examinations. First, providing companionship may be a very
 potent way in which to promote psychological well-being in
 nonhuman primates; however, social living is not synonymous
 with well-being. The extent to which social housing promotes
 psychological well-being can vary across species and among
 individual members of the same species (for example, high- and
 low-ranking monkeys). Secondly, housing conditions can affect
 research outcomes in that group-housed animals may differ from
 individually housed animals in response to some manipulation.
 Social interaction may be a significant variable in regulating
 the biobehavioral responses of nonhuman primates to
 experimental manipulations. Finally, a larger number of
 socially housed subjects than individually housed subjects
 maybe necessary for some biomedical research projects to yield
 adequate data analysis. Thus, social living has significant
 benefits and some potential costs not only for the animals
 themselves, but for the research enterprise.
 
 
 480                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.L342
 Social stress in laboratory mouse colonies.
 Brain, P.F.
 Potters Bar : Universities Federation for Animal Welfare;
 1989. Laboratory animal welfare research : rodents : proc of a
 symposium organized by Universities Federation for Animal
 Welfare, held at the Royal Holloway and Bedford New College,
 Univ of London, Egham, Surrey, 22nd April 1988. p. 49-61;
 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Stress; Animal housing; Groups
 
 
 481                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A social tethering system for nonhuman primates used in
 laboratory research. Coelho, A.M. Jr; Carey, K.D.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jul. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (4): p.
 388-394; 1990 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Tethered housing; Catheters; Cages;
 Social behavior; Monitoring; Sampling; Physiological
 functions; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  A housing and tether system was designed to permit
 sampling of body fluids, chronic monitoring of physiologic
 parameters (e.g. blood pressure, heart rate), performance of
 species typical behavioral interactions (aggression,
 affiliation, reproduction, etc), physical exercise (work on a
 motorized treadmill), assessment of water and diet
 consumption, as well as feces and urine collection. The system
 provided primates with the opportunity to engage in species
 typical social behavior and thereby minimized conditions which
 have been identified as contributing to the development of
 abnormal behaviors associated with individual housing. The
 system consisted of two parts: (a) a specialized cage system
 for housing small social groups of primates and (b) a tether
 and indwelling catheter system. Each modular system permitted
 four adult baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis) to be tethered
 and housed in a social group. Each cage was 2.44 X 2.44 X 1.22
 m (L X W X H) and could be subdivided by means of woven wire
 wall partitions. The tether system consisted of a backpack, a
 cloth jacket, a stainless-steel flexible cable containing
 electrical cables and catheters, and a saline infusion pump
 mounted on top of the cage. The system provides laboratory
 primates with the ability to socially interact with other
 nonhuman primates. The social cage tether system represents an
 example of a housing environment which could conform to both
 the letter and spirit of the new animal welfare legislation
 and still remain compatible with the objective of obtaining
 scientific data.
 
 
 482                                NAL Call. No.: QL737.C22C36
 Socialization and management of purpose-bred dogs.
 Carroll, T.; Valerio, D.A.; Pucak, G.
 Bethesda, MD : Scientists Center for Animal Welfare; 1990 Jan.
 Canine research environment / edited by Joy A. Mench and Lee
 Krulisch. p. 33-37; 1990 Jan.  Paper presented at a conference
 held by the Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, June 22,
 1989, Bethesda, Md. Question and answer session p. 37. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Dogs; Animal husbandry; Animal housing; Animal
 breeding; Animal welfare; Socialization
 
 
 483                                 NAL Call. No.: QL737.P9H78
 Solution to psychological enhancement of the environment for
 the nonhuman primate.
 Blackmore, W.M.
 Park Ridge, N.J. : Noyes Publications; 1989.
 Housing, care and psychological well-being of captive and
 laboratory primates / edited by Evalyn F. Segal. p. 235-243.
 ill; 1989.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Environment; Facilities; Cages;
 Exercise; Animal welfare; Psychological factors
 
 
 484                                   NAL Call. No.: 41.8 AM3A
 Some effects of limited exercise on purpose-bred Beagles.
 Campbell, S.A.; Hughes, H.C.; Griffin, H.E.; Landi, M.S.;
 Mallon, F.M. Schaumburg, Ill. : American Veterinary Medical
 Association; 1988 Aug. American journal of veterinary research
 v. 49 (8): p. 1298-1301; 1988 Aug. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Dogs; Exercise; Stress; Lymphocyte
 transformation; Cortisol; Animal welfare
 
 Abstract:  Amendments to the Animal Welfare Act (PL 99-198)
 require that an exercise program for dogs be established by
 the attending veterinarian. A 6-week study was conducted to
 determine the effects of a moderate exercise program in
 purpose-bred Beagles. Sixteen male Beagles (4/group) were
 maintained as follows: (1) standard cage without exercise; (2)
 standard cage with individual exercise periods (35 minutes, 3
 times/week); (3) large cage without exercise; and (4) standard
 cage with group-release exercise periods. Blood samples were
 collected for CBC, serum biochemical analysis including
 determination of serum cortisol concentration, and immune
 function (lymphocyte transformation assay). Group-released
 dogs interacted with each other during most of the exercise
 time. Fighting in these dogs occurred only during the third
 week. Dogs had little inclination to exercise when released
 along into the exercise area. Regardless of the size of the
 cage, dogs did not exercise unless human beings were present
 in the room. There were no significant differences in
 laboratory findings among dogs in the 4 groups. This moderate
 exercise program had no demonstrable effects. Similarly,
 continuous cage housing, without a formal exercise program,
 could not be determined to be detrimental to the physiologic
 or health status of dogs.
 
 
 485                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Some factors which affect the ability of rats to cope with
 food deprivation. Naylor, V.H.; Davies, K.
 Sussex : The Institute of Animal Technology; 1987 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 38 (1): p. 35-44. ill; 1987 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Animal experiments; Deprivation; Animal
 housing; Male animals; Rat feeding
 
 
 486                              NAL Call. No.: RB125.C68 1985
 Specialized management of a miniature swine herd for the EPRI
 electric field study.
 Beamer, J.L.; Horstman, V.G.
 New York : Plenum Press; 1986.
 Swine in biomedical research / edited by M.E. Tumbleson. p.
 217-221. ill; 1986.  Proceedings of a conference on Swine in
 Biomedical Research, June 17-20, 1985, Columbia, Missouri. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Washington; Pigs; Small animal rearing; Electric
 field; Pig housing; Herds; Facilities
 
 
 487                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Spontaneous and experimental infections in scid and scid/beige
 mice. Percy, D.H.; Barta, J.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1993 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 43 (2): p.
 127-132; 1993 Apr.  Paper presented at a conference entitled
 "The Scid Mouse in Biomedical and Agricultural Research,"
 August 5-7, 1992, Guelph, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Mutants; Infections
 
 Abstract:  Severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice are
 valuable animals to study a variety of logic and disease
 processes. Their capacity to support multiple tissue
 xenografts permits these mice to be used as intermediate
 models for host-specific, fastidious organisms for which a
 small animal model has not been available previously. However,
 because they are unable to mount a normal immune response,
 they are very susceptible to a variety of primary and
 opportunistic microbial pathogens. Fatal, naturally occurring
 infections with bacteria such as Proteus mirabilis,
 Streptococcus viridans, and Escherichia coli have been
 observed. In addition, based on observations after
 experimental or naturally occurring viral infections, scid and
 scid/beige mice have been shown to be very susceptible to
 infections with viruses such as mouse hepatitis virus, Sendai
 virus, and murine respiratory virus, with resulting mortality.
 Of the parasitic infections, Pneumocystis carinii is a
 relatively common contaminant of the respiratory tracts of
 scid mice and may complicate research projects, particularly
 experimental respiratory tract infections. In view of the
 enhanced susceptibility of these mice to infections of this
 type, it is essential that they be housed under optimal
 conditions, which include implementing stringent management
 practices and a functional barrier system.
 
 
 488                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Spontaneous inclusion body hepatitis in young tamarins. I.
 Morphological study.
 Stiglmair-Herb, M.T.; Scheid, R.; Hanichen, T.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1992 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 26 (2): p. 80-87; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory mammals; Viral hepatitis; Nuclear
 inclusions; Liver cells; Endoplasmic reticulum; Histopathology
 
 Abstract:  Over a period of 4 years approximately 60% of the
 new born and juvenile animals in a breeding colony of tamarins
 (Saguinus fuscicollis) died a sudden death. Histological
 examination at necropsy revealed interstitial hepatitis in 22
 of the 30 young animals of the present study. The hepatocytes
 contained intranuclear inclusion bodies in 12 of the 22 cases.
 Upon ultrastructural examination, tubulovesicular structures
 and amorphous material were found in the nuclei. The
 endoplasmic reticulum had proliferated and was closely
 associated with undulating curved membranes. These
 morphological alterations resemble those reported in
 chimpanzees experimentally infected with NANB hepatitis
 viruses.
 
 
 489                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Sprague Dawley rat mutant with tremor, ataxia, tonic
 immobility episodes, epilepsy and paralysis.
 Holmgren, B.; Urba-Holmgren, R.; Riboni, L.; Vega-
 SaenzdeMiera, E.C. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1989 May. Laboratory animal science
 v. 39 (3): p. 226-228; 1989 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mutations; Mutants; Paralysis; Epilepsy;
 Tremor; Ataxia
 
 Abstract:  A spontaneous neurological mutation was detected in
 a colony of Sprague Dawley rats. The animals developed a
 progressive neurological syndrome characterized by tremor
 (which appeared at the age of 1 month), ataxia (at 4 months),
 immobility episodes (after 5-6 months), audiogenic seizures
 and hindlimb paralysis (after 10 months). Cross breeding
 experiments indicate that this is an autosomal recessive
 mutation, which we have named taiep subline.
 
 
 490                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Streptobacillus moniliformis epizootic in barrier-maintained
 C57BL/6J mice and susceptibility to infection of different
 strains of mice. Wullenweber, M.; Kaspareit-Rittinghausen, J.;
 Farouq, M.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Nov. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (6): p.
 608-612; 1990 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Streptobacillus; Strain differences;
 Susceptibility; Outbreaks; Genetic resistance
 
 Abstract:  We report a Streptobacillus moniliformis epizootic
 in barrier-maintained SPF mice. Although various inbred and F1
 hybrid strains of mice have been kept in this animal facility,
 only Han:C57BL/6J mice showed clinical signs of disease.
 During the course of the epizootic, 825 breeding animals
 (approximately 36% of the breeders) died or had to be killed
 because of severe clinical signs. Although sequential
 treatment with ampicillin and chlortetracycline gave good
 therapeutic results, the animal facility was vacated in order
 to exclude any risk of cross-contamination of the other rodent
 colonies in our institute. The source and route of
 transmission of S moniliformis could not be elucidated. To
 investigate strain dependent differences experimental
 infection of different strains of mice with our S moniliformis
 isolate was performed. After oral infection only C57BL,/6J
 showed the typical signs of a cervical lymphadenitis and gave
 an immunological response. BALB/cJ, C3H/He, DBA/2J, CB6F1 and
 B6D2F1 mice were not affected except in two cases of DBA/2J
 and B6D2F1 mice where serconversion was observed. After
 intravenous infection of C57BL/6J, DBA/21 and BALB/cJ all
 animals showed positive titers in the indirect
 immunofluorescence test (IIF). One hundred percent of the
 C57BL/6J, forty percent of the DBA/2J, and none of the BALB/cJ
 mice developed severe symptoms. The results demonstrate that
 the susceptibility to streptobacillosis is predominantly
 influenced by genetic factors.
 
 
 491                                  NAL Call. No.: HV4701.A45
 The stress of captivity.
 Pereira, M.E.
 Westport, Conn. : Animal Rights Network; 1987 Jul.
 The Animals' agenda v. 7 (6): p. 46-47. ill; 1987 Jul.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Social interaction; Stress; Cages;
 Animal behavior; Animal housing; Medical research
 
 
 492                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Studies on beige-nude mice with low natural killer cell
 activity. 1. Introduction of the bg gene into nude mice and
 the characteristics of beige-nude mice.
 Hioki, K.; Maruo, K.; Suzuki, S.; Kato, H.; Shimamura, K.;
 Saito, M.; Nomura, T.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (1): p. 72-77. ill; 1987 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Strains; Mutants; Genes; Genotypes; Animal
 breeding; Cell physiology
 
 Abstract:  To improve the take-rate of human tumours in nude
 mice, a nude mouse strain with the bg gene was established.
 The introduction of the bg gene was confirmed by examination
 of giant granules of blood neutrophils. The genetic profile of
 beige-nude mice was the same as that of the C57BL/6 strain
 according to genetic screening. The natural killer cell
 activity in the beige-nude mice was much lower than that in
 ordinary nude mice but slightly higher than that in beige
 mice. The reproductivity of beige-nude mice was as high as
 that of ordinary nude mice.
 
 
 493                                 NAL Call. No.: 290.9 AM32P
 A study of existing lighting systems and the potential for
 energy conservation in Wisconsin dairy facilities (preliminary
 results).
 Severance C.W.; Herrman, A.D.; Bowe, D.A.
 St. Joseph, Mich. : The Society; 1989.
 Paper - American Society of Agricultural Engineers (89-3021):
 p. 13-49; 1989. Paper presented at the International Summer
 Meeting of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers and
 the Canadian Society of Agricultural Engineering, June 25-28,
 1989, Quebec, PQ, Canada.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Wisconsin; Dairy farms; Lighting; Electricity;
 Energy conservation
 
 
 494                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.L274
 The supply of laboratory animals.
 Donelly, H.
 Chichester [England] : Wiley; 1987.
 Laboratory animals : an introduction for new experimenters /
 edited by A.A. Tuffery. p. 63-78; 1987.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; U.S.A.; Laboratory animals;
 Reproduction; Animal breeding; Animal breeding methods;
 Legislation; Supply; Costs
 
 
 495                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A survey of Pneumocystis carinii infection in research mouse
 colonies in Japan.
 Serikawa, T.; Kitada, K.; Muraguchi, T.; Yamada, J.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (5): p.
 411-414; 1991 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Japan; Mice; Pneumocystis carinii; Disease
 prevalence; Disease surveys; Laboratories; Germfree animals
 
 Abstract:  To determine the frequency of Pneumocystis carinii
 infection in mouse colonies maintained for biomedical research
 in medical colleges or medical faculties in universities in
 Japan, 409 nu/nu mice were sent to 43 animal facilities from a
 P. carinii-free colony. The animals were housed for 6 months
 in groups of 3 to 10 animals per room, and examined for the
 presence of parasites and infection. Colonies in 10 (24.4%) of
 41 facilities were positive for the infection. Of 383 animals
 in 69 rooms, the organism was detected in 66 (17.2%) animals
 in 13 (18.8%) rooms. The difference in the proportion of rooms
 where mice were positive for P. carinii is clearly seen among
 these three groups; SPF mouse rooms (4 of 38 rooms, 10.5%),
 SPF mouse rooms with breeding units (5 of 25 rooms, 20.0%) and
 conventional mouse rooms (4 of 6 rooms, 66.7%). The survey
 indicates that strict housing arrangements and husbandry
 techniques are necessary to keep SPF mice free from P. carinii
 infection.
 
 
 496                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A survey of staphylococci isolated from the laboratory gerbil.
 Solomon, H.F.; Dixon, D.M.; Pouch, W.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 May. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (3): p.
 316-318; 1990 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Gerbils; Staphylococcus; Dermatitis; Nose;
 Opportunistic infections
 
 Abstract:  A microbiological survey of the Mongolian gerbil,
 Meriones unguiculatus, revealed coagulase-negative
 staphylococci to be common inhabitants of representative
 animals derived from three different breeding colonies. The
 nasal area was most often culture positive, and Staphylococcus
 xylosus was a predominant species. S. xylosus was the only
 organism cultured from nasal dermatitis. These organisms were
 found to be susceptible in vitro to the majority of the
 antimicrobial agents tested. This survey indicates that the
 possible role of S. xylosus as an opportunistic pathogen
 warrants further investigation.
 
 
 497                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1I43
 Swine in biomedical research management and models.
 Swindle, M.M.; Smith, A.C.; Laber-Laird, K.; Dungan, L.
 Washington, Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, National
 Research Council; 1993.
 ILAR news v. 36 (1): p. 1-5; 1993.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Animal experiments; Medical research;
 Animal husbandry; Animal models
 
 
 498                                    NAL Call. No.: 41.8 C81
 Swine models for cardiovascular research: a low stress
 transport and restraint system for large swine.
 Lighty, G.W. Jr; Spear, R.S.; Karatay, M.C.; Hare, C.L.;
 Carlson, R.J. Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell Veterinarian, Inc; 1992
 Apr.
 Cornell veterinarian v. 82 (2): p. 131-140; 1992 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pigs; Disease models; Cages; Restraint of
 animals; Transport of animals; Stress; Safety; Blood specimen
 collection; Echocardiography
 
 
 499                                   NAL Call. No.: 60.18 J82
 Technical note: automatic sorting of free-ranging cattle.
 Anderson, D.M.; Rouda, R.R.; Murray, L.W.; Pieper, R.D.
 Denver, Colo. : Society for Range Management; 1992 May.
 Journal of range management v. 45 (3): p. 312-314; 1992 May. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cattle; Free range husbandry; Sorting;
 Automation; Cattle feeding; Weight determination; Liveweight;
 Supplementary feeding; Cottonseed protein; Drinking behavior
 
 Abstract:  An automated system to weigh and sort free-ranging
 cattle was adapted to administer cottonseed pellets (41% crude
 protein) to free-ranging cattle. The frequency with which
 animals drank water determined the interval between
 supplemental feedings. The automatic spacing of individual
 animals was the weakest link in the chain of events leading to
 the sorting of cattle into groups to administer treatments.
 Periodically during the study, free-standing water was
 available due to above-average precipitation. This resulted in
 an inconsistent supplementation schedule because animals did
 not have to return through the maze to drink water. Single
 herd management eliminated potential pasture-treatment
 confounding but accentuated individual animal behavior, which
 resulted in a range of supplement intakes and drinking water
 patterns.
 
 
 500                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Technique for long-term infusion into the inferior mesenteric
 artery of unrestrained rats.
 Aguiar, J.L.A.; Garzon, F.T.; Schneider, S.; Berger, M.R.;
 Schlag, P.; Schmahl, D.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1988 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 22 (2): p. 173-176. ill; 1988 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Colon; Rectum; Neoplasms; Drug therapy;
 Arteries; Injection; Cannulation
 
 Abstract:  A technique for long-term infusion into the
 inferior mesenteric artery was developed which allows simple
 and reliable regional infusion into the colorectal segment of
 unrestrained rats. The cannulation system consists of an
 injection port 'In Stoppers' as a flow swivel, connected to an
 injection needle, which is inserted into a polyethylene tube
 protected by a steel spiral. During infusion the animals are
 free to move in the cage with access to food and water ad
 libitum. The method is suitable for regional chemotherapy as
 well as for studies of colorectal tumours in rats. In this
 study 73% of the cannulae remained functional for continuous
 infusion over a 15 day period.
 
 
 501                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 A technique for rearing germfree piglets obtained without
 surgery. Ratcliffe, B.; Fordham, J.P.
 Essex : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1987 Jan.
 Laboratory animals v. 21 (1): p. 53-59. ill; 1987 Jan. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Piglets; Germ free husbandry; Laboratory rearing;
 Cages; Isolation technique; Equipment
 
 Abstract:  A relatively simple procedure is described for
 obtaining germfree piglets which does not involve hysterectomy
 or hysterotomy. Newborn pigs were delivered into an isolator
 and their freedom from microbial contamination was ensured by
 applying bactericidal solutions externally and a combination
 of antibiotics in solution per os. 40 piglets so derived have
 been maintained free from detectable micro-organisms, some for
 up to 140 days. Equipment is described which allowed the long-
 term holding of these animals so that nutritional balance
 studies could be completed.
 
 
 502                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.L342
 Territory formation by mice under laboratory conditions:
 welfare considerations.
 Bishop, M.J.; Chevins, P.F.D.
 Potters Bar : Universities Federation for Animal Welfare;
 1989. Laboratory animal welfare research : rodents : proc of a
 symposium organized by Universities Federation for Animal
 Welfare, held at the Royal Holloway and Bedford New College,
 Univ of London, Egham, Surrey, 22nd April 1988. p. 25-48;
 1989.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Animal welfare; Territoriality; Male
 animals; Stress; Corticosterone; Blood plasma; Urea; Testes;
 Testosterone; Animal housing
 
 
 503                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Tetanus in baboons of a corral breeding colony.
 Goodwin, W.J.; Haines, R.J.; Bernal, J.C.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Apr. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (2): p.
 231-232. ill; 1987 Apr.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Baboons; Tetanus; Clostridium tetani; Treatment
 
 
 504                                     NAL Call. No.: 410 Z35
 The timing of mating by postpartum estrous rats.
 Hedricks, C.; McClintock, M.K.
 Berlin, W. Ger. : Paul Parey; 1985 Jan.
 Zeitschrift fur Tierpsychologie v. 67 (114): p. 1-16; 1985
 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mating behavior; Pups; Maternal behavior;
 Breeding season; Estrus; Nesting
 
 
 505                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Towards the computerized animal house: the Newcastle
 University Animal House Management System.
 Wootton, R.; Flecknell, P.A.
 London : Laboratory Animal Science Association; 1986 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 20 (2): p. 165-172; 1986 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: United  Kingdom; Animal housing; Computer
 software; Management units; Animal husbandry; Accounting
 
 
 506                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Training by microchip in the animal facility.
 Miller, L.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1992 Feb.
 Lab animal v. 21 (2): p. 37-41; 1992 Feb.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Technicians; Training; Computer techniques
 
 
 507                       NAL Call. No.: Videocassette no.1315
 Training corral-living rhesus monkeys for fecal and blood
 sample collection Jeff Falkenstein Productions ; M.R. Clarke
 ... [et al.].
 Clarke, M. R.
 Delta Regional Primate Research Center, Jeff Falkenstein
 Productions Covington, LA : Falkenstein Productions : Delta
 Regional Primate Research Center,; 1990.
 1 videocassette (27 min.) : sd., col. ; 1/2 in. + 1 article
 reprint (3 p.)..
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Blood; Feces; Rhesus monkey; Animal welfare;
 Laboratory animals; Primates
 
 Abstract:  This videotape shows the acclimation techniques to
 reduce stress for corral-living rhesus monkeys (Macaca
 mulatta) when collecting fecal and blood samples. The monkeys
 are given food rewards in return for defecation in single
 holding cages. They also are trained to extend their leg
 through a modified sqeeze cage for unanesthetized bleeding
 from the saphenous vein. Once the acclimation is completed,
 the animals are shown to be relaxed during the procedure. One
 adult female continued to nurse her neonate infant through the
 venipuncture. This behavior modification is intended to reduce
 stress and increase safety for the animals and the
 technicians. This tape also provides a look at the corral
 facility at the Delta Regional Primate Research Center at
 Tulane University.
 
 
 508                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Training in laboratory animal medicine and science: the
 Canadian situation. McLaughlin, S.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1990 Dec.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 41 (3): p. 181-190; 1990 Dec.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Canada; Technical training; Veterinary education;
 Technicians; Veterinarians; Research workers; Laboratory
 animals
 
 Abstract:  Education of technicians, investigators and
 laboratory animal veterinarians is a matter of increasing
 concern in Canada. Three basic training models exist for
 technicians: full-time college programs, in-house courses and
 a cooperative venture involving a community college (St.
 Lawrence, Kingston) and participating laboratory animal
 facilities coast-to-coast across Canada. CALAS/ACTAL maintains
 a technician registry. Training of investigators is all done
 currently in-house. In some universities, this training is
 mandatory. The CCAC syllabus provides guidelines for such
 training courses. Currently there is not a registry for
 investigators. There are limited opportunities in Canada for
 postdoctoral training in laboratory animal medicine for
 veterinarians. The situation is under review by CALAM which is
 conducting a needs assessment. Canadian laboratory animal
 veterinarians seeking recognition for specialised training
 must do so currently by writing to the Board examination of
 the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM).
 
 
 509                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Training material for animal facility personnel, January 1989-
 January 1994. Allen, T.
 Beltsville, Md., National Agricultural Library; 1994 Mar.
 Quick bibliography series - National Agricultural Library
 (94-17): 60 p.; 1994 Mar.  Updates QB 91-107.07.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animals; Laboratories; Research; Careproviders;
 Workers; Training; Teaching materials; Bibliographies
 
 
 510                                   NAL Call. No.: aZ5071.N3
 Training materials for animal facility personnel, January
 1979-August 1989. Clingerman, K.
 Beltsville, Md. : The Library; 1989 Dec.
 Quick bibliography series - U.S. Department of Agriculure,
 National Agricultural Library (U.S.). (90-08): 18 p.; 1989
 Dec.  Bibliography.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Animal housing; Laboratory animals; Animals;
 Careproviders; Teaching materials; Bibliographies
 
 
 511                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 The training of cynomolgus monkeys and how the human/animal
 relationship improves with environmental and mental
 enrichment.
 Heath, M.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1989 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 40 (1): p. 11-22. ill; 1989 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Monkeys; Training (animal); Attachment behavior;
 Environment; Social behavior; Cages
 
 
 512                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 Transgenic mouse colony management.
 Geistfeld, J.G.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1991 Jan.
 Lab animal v. 20 (1): p. 21-25, 28-29; 1991 Jan.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Transgenics; Breeding methods
 
 
 513                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Transmission experiments of cilia-associated respiratory
 bacillus in mice, rabbits and guineapigs.
 Matsushita, S.; Joshima, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Fukutsu, K.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Apr.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (2): p. 96-102. ill; 1989 Apr. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Rabbits; Guinea pigs; Respiratory diseases;
 Disease transmission; Bacillus
 
 Abstract:  Transmission experiments of cilia-associated
 respiratory (CAR) bacillus were performed in mice in order to
 clarify the principal route of the infection, and in rabbits
 and guineapigs in order to examine their susceptibility.
 Determination of the infection was evaluated serologically by
 the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) technique and
 histologically by the presence of CAR bacillus in the airways.
 BALB/c mice were intranasally inoculated with the SMR strain
 of CAR bacillus. The IFA antibody to the bacteria in these
 mice rose to more than 1:160 at 4 weeks postinoculation (PI)
 and the mice utilized as transmitters for the following
 experiments. One out of 15 uninfected mice kept in intracage
 contact with infected mice became infected from 4 weeks after
 contact. Incidence of contact infection increased thereafter.
 On the other hand, there was no evidence of infection in the
 uninfected mice housed in the separate cages from the cage in
 which infected mice were housed throughout the 12-week
 observation period. The primary method of CAR bacillus
 transmission seems to be direct contact with infected mice or
 fomites contaminated by infected mice; airborne transmission
 appears to be of little importance. Rabbits and guineapigs
 were also intranasally inoculated with the SMR strain of CAR
 bacillus. IFA antibodies were positively detected by 4 weeks
 PI, but no CAR bacillus nor histological changes relating to
 the infection were observed in the airways of either species.
 It is suggested that rat origin CAR bacillus can transmit to
 rabbits and guineapigs, and that the infection can spread to
 other species of rodents and rabbits.
 
 
 514                                     NAL Call. No.: QL55.I5
 Transport-cage training of caged rhesus macaques.
 Reinhardt, V.
 Sussex : The Institute; 1992 Apr.
 Animal technology : journal of the Institute of Animal
 Technology v. 43 (1): p. 57-61; 1992 Apr.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Transport of animals; Training of
 animals
 
 Abstract:  Caged rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were trained
 to voluntarily enter a transport cage in an attempt to avoid
 undue distress reactions jeopardizing the validity of research
 data collected from such subjects. The training program
 required no extra technical equipment such as cage-squeeze-
 backs. Patience, gentleness, firmness and a good understanding
 of the animals were qualities of the animal care personnel
 ensuring the monkeys' willingness to cooperate. Of 341 trained
 adult rhesus macaques tested in the course of a routine
 weighing procedure, 87.4% (298/341) entered the transport cage
 promptly. Of the animals that were uncooperative, the majority
 entered the transport cage after encouragement (18/43) or
 after being prodded with a stick for no longer than 30 seconds
 (23/43). Only 2 subjects (0.6% of 341) stubbornly refused to
 leave their home cage and had to be chemically immobilized
 before they could be removed. Neither cage location (165
 animals in lower-row cages, 176 animals in upper-row cages),
 sex (237 females, 104 males) or housing condition (67 single-
 housed animals, 274 pair-housed animals) had a noticeable
 impact on the animals' cooperativeness during the catching
 procedure. It was concluded that the time investment in the
 initial training quickly paid off in predictably swift
 catching of caged subjects that were not unduly distressed
 when entering the transport cage.
 
 
 515                                     NAL Call. No.: 472 N42
 Trapped in a guilt cage: How do scientist and technicians
 avoid getting close to the animals they work with?.
 Arluke, A.
 London, Eng. : New Science Publications; 1992 Apr04.
 New scientist v. 134 (1815): p. 33-35; 1992 Apr04.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: U.S.A.; Animal experiments; Animal welfare;
 Public opinion
 
 
 516                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 A typical moist dermatitis in rabbits.
 Garibaldi, B.A.; Fox, J.G.; Musto, D.R.T.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Nov. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (6): p.
 652-653; 1990 Nov.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rabbits; Dermatitis; Cages; Moisture; Pseudomonas
 aeruginosa; Staphylococcus aureus; Case reports
 
 
 517                                NAL Call. No.: SF407.M37B68
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of cephalopods in
 the laboratory..  Care and management of cephalopods in the
 laboratory Care &amp; management of cephalopods in the laboratory
 Boyle, P. R.
 Universities Federation for Animal Welfare
 Potters Bar, Herts. [England] : Universities Federation for
 Animal Welfare,; 1991.
 63 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.  Includes bibliographical references (p.
 53-58).
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Marine invertebrates as laboratory animals;
 Cephalopoda
 
 
 518                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.U5 1987
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of laboratory
 animals., 6th ed.. Poole, Trevor B.; Robinson, Ruth,
 Universities Federation for Animal Welfare
 London : Longman ; New York : Churchill Livingstone,; 1987. x,
 933 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.  Includes index.  Bibliography: p.
 848-918.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals
 
 
 519                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Ultrasonic determination of fetal parameters in baboons (Papio
 anubis). Herring, J.M.; Fortman, J.D.; Anderson, R.J.;
 Bennett, B.T. Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for
 Laboratory Animal Science; 1991 Dec. Laboratory animal science
 v. 41 (6): p. 602-605; 1991 Dec.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Papio anubis; Fetal development; Age
 determination; Normal values; Age; Measurement; Dimensions;
 Ultrasound
 
 Abstract:  The use of nonhuman primates to study reproductive
 physiology, fetal development, and neonatal management often
 depends on the availability of pregnant and fetal animals of
 known gestational history. The purpose of this study was to
 establish and correlate normal fetal growth parameters with
 gestational age in olive baboons (Papio anubis). Normal
 cycling females were bred to proven males by using the degree
 of perineal swelling and vaginal cytology to determine onset
 of ovulation. The subjects were evaluated to determine
 pregnancy beginning 18 days postmating, using an Aloka-650
 diagnostic ultrasound unit, equipped with a 7.5 mhz prostate
 probe and a 5 mhz transabdominal probe. Ten pregnant animals
 were then evaluated sonographically every 3 days through day
 30 and weekly through day 135 (average gestation 184 days).
 Measurements included gestational sac, greatest-length,
 biparietal diameter, femur length, head circumference, and
 abdominal circumference. Using the means and standard
 deviations, growth curves were constructed, and the data used
 to develop predicted value charts for gestational age
 estimation. Using the predicted value charts established in
 our study, subsequent evaluation of pregnant baboons in our
 colony disclosed concordance with actual gestational age.
 
 
 520                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Unidirectional distribution of mosaicism in chimeric rats.
 Yamashita, T.; Kasai, N.; Miyoshi, I.; Namioka, S.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1992 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 42 (3): p.
 270-274; 1992 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Chimeras; Mosaicism; Inbred strains; Coat;
 Color; Erythrocytes; Cholinesterase; Isoenzymes; Major
 histocompatibility complex
 
 Abstract:  Experimental rat chimeras were produced by
 aggregation of eight-cell embryos from two inbred strains,
 ACI/Hkm and WKAH/Hkm, which differ from each other in their
 major histocompatibility, complexes and coat colors, and their
 mosaicism was analyzed. The existence of the isozyme Es-1, a
 serum cholinesterase specifically produced by WKAH-derived
 cells, and the agouti coat color due to ACI cells, indicated
 that all of the rats analyzed were unequivocal chimeras. The
 proportion of ACI cells in the red blood cell populations of
 the chimeras varied from 45% to 98% as determined with a
 fluorescence-activated cell sorter and a monoclonal antibody
 against class I (RT1) antigen. Digital analysis of the coat
 color revealed that the proportion of the ACI type of coat
 color ranged from 72% to 98% in these chimeric rats. Each
 phenotype expressed in the coat color was complex and varied
 in size. The ratios of red blood cells and the coat color
 inclined toward the ACI type of cell population. Conversely,
 the rate of the WKAH-cell-type population was less than 50%. A
 breeding test disclosed chimerism of germ cells in two
 chimeric rats, and there were more pups with agouti coats than
 with albino coats. Taken together, it was shown in most of the
 phenotypes analyzed that the ACT type of cells was predominant
 in all of the chimeric rats. We discuss the possible causes
 for this unbalanced distribution in the rats.
 
 
 521                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 A unique housing system for rhesus macaques.
 Kaplan, M.L.; Lobao, B.J.
 New York, N.Y. : Nature Publishing Company; 1991 Jun.
 Lab animal v. 20 (6): p. 48-50; 1991 Jun.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Macaca mulatta; Cages
 
 
 522                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Urologic syndrome associated with wire caging in AKR mice.
 Everitt, J.I.; Ross, P.W.; Davis, T.W.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1988 Oct. Laboratory animal science v. 38 (5): p.
 609-611; 1988 Oct.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Strains; Cages; Animal housing; Wire;
 Toxicology; Urinary tract diseases
 
 
 523                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Use of cage space by guineapigs.
 White, W.J.; Balk, M.W.; Lang, C.M.
 London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (3): p. 208-214; 1989 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Guinea pigs; Cage size; Group size; Clustering;
 Animal welfare; Space requirements; Spatial distribution;
 Diurnal activity; Nocturnal activity
 
 Abstract:  Cage space requirements for laboratory animals have
 been established by Government Regulation and Recommendations.
 In order to test the adequacy of these space allocations, the
 use of cage floor area by breeding groups of guineapigs was
 studied. A computer-coupled video tracking system capable of
 imaging in low light intensity as well as total darkness was
 used to determine the average per cent occupancy by guineapigs
 in all portions of a cage over 12-h light and dark cycles.
 Simultaneous time synchronized slow motion video recordings
 permitted an analysis of activity to be coordinated with cage
 use data. Results of the study revealed that breeding groups
 of guineapigs utilize the periphery of the cage almost to the
 total exclusion of the centre of the cage. Approximately
 75-85% of an occupancy in both the day and evening hours
 occurred in 47% of the cage floor area located along the
 periphery. Analysis of video recordings revealed that the
 animals remained active throughout the day and night with no
 prolonged period of quiescence that could be associated with
 sleep. Results of this study suggest that while guidelines for
 housing guineapigs based on area allocation per animal can be
 formulated and are easy to administer, they cannot be
 supported by the behavioural characteristics of these animals
 or careful quantitation of their pattern of cage space
 utilization.
 
 
 524                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 The use of computer controlled drinking systems in
 pharmacological research. Petrie, B.F.; Gabert, H.F.; Toms,
 M.P.; Tressel, W.R.; Alexander, B.K.; Beyerstein, B.L.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 105-110. ill; 1985.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Animal housing; Water
 troughs; Computer applications; Pharmacology
 
 
 525                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The use of dirty bedding for detection of marine pathogens in
 sentinel mice. Thigpen, J.E.; Lebetkin, E.H.; Dawes, M.L.;
 Amyx, H.L.; Caviness, G.F.; Sawyer, B.A.; Blackmore, D.E.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1989 Jul. Laboratory animal science v. 39 (4): p.
 324-327; 1989 Jul.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Litter; Viral hepatitis; Antibody
 titer; Myobia musculi; Environment; Laboratory tests
 
 Abstract:  Sentinel Swiss (CD-1) mice, housed without filter
 bonnets, were seronegative for mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) for
 8 consecutive months in an experimental colony of CD-1 mice.
 MHV titers had been detected sporadically in sentinel mice
 housed in this colony during a 2 year period. In an effort to
 determine whether MHV was still present in the colony, two
 methods of exposing sentinel mice to an animal room
 environment were compared under routine husbandry practices.
 Eight cages (12 mice per cage; 2 cages per rack) of
 experimental virus antibody free sentinel mice, housed without
 filter bonnets, were placed on the bottom shelf of 4 of 12
 racks in the room. Twice each week, four cages of sentinel
 mice received a composite sample of dirty bedding (bedding
 used previously by mice in the room). The remaining four cages
 of experimental sentinels received fresh non-used bedding.
 Sentinel mice were bled at monthly intervals for MHV serology.
 After 4 months, mice from two cages which received dirty
 bedding seroconverted to MHV and mice from one cage were
 positive for Myobia musculi (mites). Three weeks later, all
 four cages of mice which received dirty bedding were positive
 for MHV and three were positive for mites. In contrast, only
 two of four cages of mice which received fresh bedding were
 positive for MHV and all were negative for mites. These
 findings indicate the importance of exposing sentinel mice to
 dirty bedding and that MHV and mites may go undetected for
 several months in a mouse colony when the incidence levels are
 low where standard sanitation procedures are used.
 
 
 526                                    NAL Call. No.: QL55.L28
 Use of laboratory animals as models for studies on genetics in
 domestic animals.
 Beilharz, R.G.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers; 1986.
 Laboratory animals : laboratory animal models for domestic
 animal production / edited by E.J. Ruitenberg and P.W.J.
 Peters. p. 253-264; 1986. (World animal science. C,
 Production-system approach ; 2.).  Literature review. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Domestic animals; Models;
 Quantitative genetics; Breeding programs
 
 
 527                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Use of serum progesterone levels as an early, indirect
 evaluation of pregnancy in the timed pregnant domestic cat.
 Hammer, J.G.; Howland, D.R.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1991 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 41 (1): p.
 42-45; 1991 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Cats; Queens; Progesterone; Blood serum;
 Pregnancy diagnosis; Embryos; Age
 
 Abstract:  There has been much research studying the effect of
 homotypic embryonic neural tissue transplantation in the
 central nervous system of rats and cats, with promising
 results. The benefits of transplantation are dependent upon
 the appropriate aged donor. Therefore, it is critical that the
 exact age of the embryonic tissue be known. For this reason we
 have developed a method of determining, indirectly, the
 pregnancy status and embryonic age in the domestic cat (Felis
 catus) using serum progesterone levels. Serum progesterone
 levels were monitored in 16 domestic cats during 26 breeding
 trials. Blood samples were taken prior to and 6 days after
 natural breeding to determine if ovulation had occurred,
 indirectly indicating pregnancy status. By knowing the exact
 date bred and if it resulted in pregnancy, an accurate
 embryonic age was calculated. A day 6 post-breeding serum
 progesterone concentration of < 5.0 ng/ml was considered a
 negative indication of pregnancy, > 5.0 ng/ml a positive
 indication of pregnancy. Pregnancy was confirmed by abdominal
 palpation 21 to 26 days after breeding. Serum progesterone
 levels taken on the sixth day after observed breeding provide
 an accurate, indirect evaluation of pregnancy in the timed
 pregnant domestic cat (81%, p=0.003).
 
 
 528                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Use of streptomycin and isoniazid during a tuberculosis
 epizootic in a rhesus and cynomolgus breeding colony.
 Ward, G.S.; Elwell, M.R.; Tingpalapong, M.; Pomsdhit, J.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1985 Aug. Laboratory animal science v. 35 (4): p.
 395-399. ill; 1985 Aug.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rhesus monkeys; Tuberculosis; Streptomycin;
 Treatment
 
 
 529                               NAL Call. No.: QL55.I55 1983
 The use of the flexible film isolator in the management of rat
 and mouse colonies.
 Peters, A.G.
 Stuttgart, [W. Ger.] : G. Fisher Verlag; 1985.
 The Contribution of laboratory animal science to the welfare
 of man and animals--past, present and future : 8th Symposium
 of ICLAS/CALAS, Vancouver, 1983 / editors: J. Archibald, J.
 Pitchfield, H.C. Rowsell. p. 435-438; 1985. Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Mice; Isolation; Management; Animal
 breeding; Animal husbandry
 
 
 530                                   NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L3
 Uterine involvement in guineapig salmonellosis.
 Okewole, P.A.; Uche, E.M.I.; Oyetunde, I.L.; Odeyemi, P.S.;
 Dawul, P.B. London : Royal Society of Medicine Services; 1989
 Jul.
 Laboratory animals v. 23 (3): p. 275-277; 1989 Jul.  Includes
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Nigeria; Guinea pigs; Salmonella typhimurium;
 Uterus; Lesions; Symptoms; Mortality; Salmonellosis; Outbreaks
 
 Abstract:  Of 334 mature breeding guineapigs, 53 (15.9%) died
 in a disease outbreak involving Salmonella typhimurium
 serotypes 1, 4, 5 and 12:i:1,2. The uterus was consistently
 involved. Nine other Salmonella-free mature female guineapigs
 when inoculated with a pure isolate from the outbreak, using
 the subcutaneous, intramuscular or per os route, succumbed to
 salmonellosis, reproducing signs and lesions observed during
 the outbreak. Abortion was not recorded during the outbreak
 despite many pregnant sows being affected. The isolate was
 sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline, ampicillin and
 cefuroxime but resistant to co-trimoxazole, erythromycin and
 penicillin.
 
 
 531                                    NAL Call. No.: QL750.A6
 Varied cages result in more aggression in male CFLP mice.
 McGregor, P.K.; Ayling, S.J.
 Amsterdam : Elsevier Science Publishers, B.V.; 1990 May.
 Applied animal behaviour science v. 26 (3): p. 277-281; 1990
 May.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Aggressive behavior; Cages; Animal welfare
 
 
 532                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 Viral battery testing in nonhuman primate colony management.
 Kalter, S.S.; Heberling, R.L.
 Cordova, Tenn. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1990 Jan. Laboratory animal science v. 40 (1): p.
 21-23; 1990 Jan.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates; Viral diseases; Viruses; Immunoassay;
 Disease surveys; Monitoring
 
 Abstract:  Good colony management is associated with
 monitoring of animals for infectious agents. Of major current
 concern are B virus and simian AIDS (SAIDS) viruses. However,
 other viral agents frequently cause serious disease outbreaks
 which can be avoided if their presence is detected
 sufficiently early. The recent development of a rapid,
 sensitive and specific diagnostic test system, i.e., the dot
 immunobinding assay (DIA) permits the monitoring of a colony
 for many of the viruses that pose problems. By employing
 battery type testing using a panel of appropriate viral
 antigens, investigators are able to detect the increased
 presence of viral agents of concern and take necessary
 measures to prevent extension of the problem.
 
 
 533                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1L33
 The visual display board: an aid to facility management.
 Weichbrod, R.H.; Cisar, C.F.; Miller, J.G.; Simmonds, R.C. New
 York : Media Horizons; 1986 Jan.
 Lab animal v. 15 (1): p. 22-24. ill; 1986 Jan.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Facilities; Management;
 Displays; Visual aids
 
 
 534                              NAL Call. No.: HV4701.U4 no.1
 Welfare and housing of old world non-human primates (Macaca
 fascicularis and Papio sp.).
 Harris, Duncan
 Universities Federation for Animal Welfare
 Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, England : Universities Federation
 for Animal Welfare, [1988?]; 1988.
 64 p. : ill. ; 30 cm. (UFAW animal welfare research report ;
 no. 1).  Cover and spine title: Welfare and housing of
 laboratory primates.  Includes bibliographical references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Primates as laboratory animals; Animal welfare;
 Papio; Kra
 
 
 535                                  NAL Call. No.: RA1190.R42
 Why different regulatory decisions when the scientific
 information base is similar? -- Human risk assessment.
 Nilsson, R.; Tasheva, M.; Jaeger, B.
 Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press; 1993 Jun.
 Regulatory toxicology and pharmacology v. 17 (3): p. 293-332;
 1993 Jun. Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Pesticides; Regulation; Decision making;
 Management; Usage; Risk; Assessment; International cooperation
 
 Abstract:  The main objective of this analysis has been to
 characterize the role of science, in a broad sense, in
 relation to social, economical, political, and other factors
 in explaining why regulatory decisions vary in different
 countries, although they are based on more or less identical
 scientific data. Eleven countries from different geographical
 areas and with varying cultural background have provided
 information in response to an extensive questionnaire aimed at
 identifying procedures for registration, restricting, or
 banning registration for certain selected pesticides. Although
 many of these responses lacked sufficient detail in certain
 aspects, together with other documentary sources they
 nonetheless provided insight with respect to some of the main
 concerns among and between nations regarding decisions in
 pesticide management. Among the main conclusions presented in
 this analysis, the following deserves particular emphasis: The
 underlying reasons for introducing restrictions on pesticide
 use on the national level will have to be more explicitly
 stated and openly declared by regulatory bodies of all
 nations. Although more pronounced in some countries, there is
 a strong influence of nonscientific considerations in
 pesticide management, that is not always based on rational
 considerations. In the field of hazard and risk assessment
 differences in scientific opinion have primarily, but not
 exclusively been identified regarding the evaluation of
 carcinogenic effects in experimental animals. In this area
 debated issues are the interpretation of the significance for
 man of certain types of tumors, methods for dose-response
 extrapolation, genotoxic versus nongenotoxic carcinogens, the
 use of MTD in long-term studies, mechanistic approaches to
 interpret cancer induction, and others. Another area
 identified to cause divergence is exposure assessment.
 Evaluation of pesticides on the national level for the purpose
 of regulation involves a tremendous duplication of efforts
 that could be substantially reduced by effective cooperation
 on the international level.
 
 
 536                                  NAL Call. No.: SK357.A1W5
 Why do we debate animal rights?.
 Schmidt, R.H.
 Bethesda, Md. : The Society; 1990.
 Wildlife Society bulletin v. 18 (4): p. 459-461; 1990. 
 Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: California; Animal welfare; Hunting; Regulations;
 Trapping; Wildlife management
 
 
 537                                NAL Call. No.: QL55.U5 1987
 Wild rats and mice., 6th ed.
 Redfern, R.; Rowe, F.P.
 London : Longman; 1987.
 The UFAW handbook on the care and management of laboratory
 animals / edited by Trevor B. Poole; editorial assistant, Ruth
 Robinson. p. 266-274; 1987.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals; Murinae; Cages; Animal
 husbandry; Occupational hazards; Health hazards
 
 
 538                                   NAL Call. No.: 410.9 P94
 The wire-bar cage top as a barrier to breeding and genetic
 contamination of laboratory mice.
 Bean-Knudsen, D.E.; Wagner, J.E.
 Joliet, Ill. : American Association for Laboratory Animal
 Science; 1987 Jun. Laboratory animal science v. 37 (3): p.
 350-351; 1987 Jun.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Mice; Cages; Animal breeding; Barriers; Genetics;
 Contamination; Mating behavior
 
 
 539                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1I43
 Wistar diabetic fatty rat.
 Kava, R.; Peterson, R.G.; West, D.B.; Greenwood, M.R.C.
 Washington, D.C. : Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources,
 National Research Council; 1990.
 I.L.A.R. news v. 32 (3): p. 9-13; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Animal models; Animal breeding; Diabetes
 mellitus
 
 
 540                                  NAL Call. No.: QL55.A1I43
 WKY fatty rat as a model of obesity and non-insulin-dependent
 diabetes mellitus.
 Peterson, R.G.; Little, L.A.; Neel, M.A.
 Washington, D.C. : Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources,
 National Research Council; 1990.
 I.L.A.R. news v. 32 (3): p. 13-15; 1990.  Includes references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Rats; Animal models; Obesity; Diabetes mellitus;
 Animal breeding
 
 
 541                           NAL Call. No.: SF406.3.W67  1993
 Workshop proceedings approaches to the design and development
 of cost-effective laboratory animal facilities : a workshop
 sponsored by the Canadian Council on Animal Care, Ottawa,
 Ontario, June 9-11, 1993.. Approaches to the design and
 development of cost-effective laboratory animal facilities
 McKay, Donald G.; Neil, David H.
 Canadian Council on Animal Care
 Ottawa, Ont. : Canadian Council on Animal Care, [1993?]; 1993.
 xvi, 274, [31] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.  Includes bibliographical
 references.
 
 Language:  English
 
 Descriptors: Laboratory animals
 

Go to: Author Index | Subject Index | Top of Document

Author Index

 Abee, C.R. 61, 257, 327, 407
 Abshire, M.L. 466
 Adams, M. 219
 Adams, M.R. 378
 AEPA Architects Engineers, P.C. 296
 Aguiar, J.L.A. 500
 Aguila, H.N. 147
 Aksel, S. 407
 Alberius, P. 317
 Alexander, B.K. 524
 Alexander, G.J. 449
 Ali, F. 167
 Allan, D.J. 190
 Allan, David J. 403
 Allen, L.M. 188
 Allen, T. 509
 Almeida, J.D. 423
 Alvares, A.P. 151
 Alves, M.E.A.F. 137
 American Association for Laboratory Animal Science 42
 American College of Toxicology, Meeting_1990 :_Orlando,
 Fla.),Production Plus, Inc 81, 360, 450
 Amyx, H.L. 525
 Anderson, D.M. 499
 Anderson, J.H. 316, 473
 Anderson, J.R. 203
 Anderson, R.J. 519
 Anthony, K.L. 101
 Applebee, K.A. 411
 Aramayona, J.J. 343
 Arluke, A. 515
 Armstrong, D.T. 120
 Arnold, C. 35
 Arnold, C.E. 273
 Assal, A.N. 382
 Austic, R.E. 185
 Awang, A. 76
 Ayling, S.J. 531
 Bailey, D.W. 386
 Balk, M.W. 523
 Bancroft, L.S. 103
 Bantin, G.C. 13, 293
 Barber, B.R. 285
 Barnes, S.R. 61
 Barry, M.P. 82
 Barta, J.R. 487
 Barthold, S.W. 83, 164
 Bartholomew, J.L. 10
 Barzago, M.M. 343
 Baskaran, G. 297
 Baskerville, A. 239
 Baskerville, M. 325
 Baskin, S.I. 10
 Batchelor, G.R. 224, 365
 Batchelor, G.R. \u Institute of Orthopaedics, Stanmore,
 Middlesex 169
 Baumans, V. 36, 122
 Bayne, K. 9, 388, 412, 442
 Bayne, K.A.L. 143, 201, 292
 Beal, T.S. 336
 Beales, P.E. 249
 Beamer, J.L. 486
 Bean-Knudsen, D. 443
 Bean-Knudsen, D.E. 538
 Beard, C.W. 210
 Beattie, A.W. 46, 159
 Beck, M. 135
 Becking, G.C. 338
 Beilharz, R.G. 526
 Beluhan, F.Z. 372
 Bennett, B.T. 137, 372, 519
 Bennett, C.L. 310
 Berckmans, D. 102
 Bercovitch, F.B. 395
 Berens, K.L. 290
 Berger, M.R. 500
 Bernal, J.C. 503
 Bernard, B.L. 212
 Bernard, K.W. 418
 Bernstein, I.S. 477
 Berry, D.J. 294
 Bertens, A.P.M.G. 36
 Berzins, R. 96
 Besch, E.L. 4, 121, 184
 Besch-Williford, C. 371
 Bevilacqua, R.A. 331
 Beyerstein, B.L. 524
 Beynen, A.C. 36, 122
 Bhatt, P.N. 140, 164, 275
 Bickleman, T.G. 400
 Bielitzki, J. 262
 Bird, D.M. 199
 Bishop, M.J. 502
 Black, H.S. 307
 Blackmore, D.E. 525
 Blackmore, W.M. 483
 Blackshaw, J.K. 46, 159, 190
 Blackshaw, Judith K. 403
 Blom, H.J.M. 122
 Bloom, K.R. 175
 Bloomsmith, M.A. 337, 447
 Blouin, A. 276
 Bodamer, M. 466
 Bonati, M. 343
 Bond, S.J. 140
 Boosinger, T.R. 172
 Borkowski, G. 155
 Bortolotti, A. 343
 Boudreaux, M.K. 381
 Boutet, M. 276
 Bowden, D.M. 85, 262
 Bowe, D.A. 493
 Bowman, T.A. 145, 301
 Box, H.O. 136, 311
 Boyle, P. R. 517
 Bradfield, J.F. 43
 Bradlaw, J.A. 435
 Brady, A.G. 257
 Brain, P.F. 480
 Bramblett, C. 328
 Brammer, D.W. 165
 Brasky, K. 237
 Brent, L. 160
 Brewer, N.R. 80
 Brigmon, R.L. 4
 Britz, W.E. Jr 69
 Broderson, J. Roger 361
 Brooks, D.L. 65, 443
 Brosseau, L.D. 49
 Brown, R.H. 238
 Bruhin, H. 401
 Brusick, D. 435
 Bucklin, R.A. 202
 Buddingh, F. 162
 Budkie, M.A. 440
 Bulfield, G. 48, 218
 Bursi, J. 90
 Burt, D.A. 364
 Bustad, L.K. 286
 Butler, T. 237
 Butler, T.M. 251, 355
 Caldwell, F.L. 75
 Calland, C.J. 189
 Calpin, J.P. 273
 Cameron, G.A. 164
 Caminiti, Benella 67
 Campbell, S. 153, 158
 Campbell, S.A. 484
 Canadian Council on Animal Care 541
 Carey, K.D. 481
 Carlson, R.J. 498
 Carolan, B. 92
 Carroll, T. 482
 Carvalho, A. 205
 Casebolt, D.B. 154, 392
 Cassell, G.H. 352, 392
 Cassidy, Barbara A. 309
 Castle, J.P. 74
 Caviness, G.F. 525
 Chalain, T.M.B. de 469
 Chamove, A.S. 64, 173, 203
 Chapman, J.E. 426
 Chapman, L.L. 188
 Chapman, M.J. 188
 Charron, D. 410
 Chengappa, M.M. 212
 Chevins, P.F.D. 502
 Cho, F. 467
 Cioffe, C.J. 458
 Cisar, C.F. 151, 533
 Clapp, Neal K., 397
 Clark, B. 40
 Clark, J.D. 273
 Clarke, A.S. 277, 444
 Clarke, M. R. 507
 Clemons, Donna J. 232
 Clifford, D.H. 459, 460
 Clingerman, K. 510
 Clough, G. 18, 243
 Cockburn, T. 391
 Coe, C.L. 288
 Coelho, A.M. Jr 481
 Coghlan, L.G. 384
 Coiro, M.A. Sr 157
 Collins, B.R. 97
 Collins, W.E. 372
 Compton, S.R. 83
 Concannon, P.W. 376
 Conti, J. 381
 Cook, M. 175
 Cooksey, L.M. 63
 Coons, D. 14
 Cooper, E.C. 123
 Cooper, J.E. 5
 Corning, B.F. 100, 149, 157, 197
 Coutts, R.T. 96
 Cowley, D. 41
 Crockett, C.M. 85
 Crowley, T.J. 269
 Croy, B.A. 31
 Cummings, J.F. 166
 D'Amato, F.R. 113
 Dagnaes-Hansen, F. 30
 Dahl, J.F. 268
 Dahm, Lynn 68
 Dalgard, D.W. 95
 Damon, E.G. 141
 Davey, R.B. 63
 Davidson, M.K. 352
 Davies, K. 98, 485
 Davis, J.A. 118, 414
 Davis, R.T. 310
 Davis, T.W. 266, 522
 Davys, J.S. 56
 Dawes, M.L. 525
 Dawson, D. 299
 Dawson, P. 449
 Dawson, W.W. 446
 Dawul, P.B. 530
 Dayan, A.D. 33
 Deeb, B.J. 212
 Deeg, H.J. 259
 Deeny, A.A. 139
 Delta Regional Primate Research Center, Jeff Falkenstein
 Productions 507
 DeLuca, A.M. 181
 Demeter, B. 62
 Demick, D.S. 162
 DeMille, D. 177
 Dent, N.J. 222
 DeWees, D.L. 23
 Dewsbury, D.A. 138
 Dexter, S. 388
 Dexter, S.L. 201, 292
 Diamond, E.J. 407
 Dickens, M.S. 435
 Dietert, R.R. 185
 Dietrich, H.M. 244
 DiGiacomo, R.F. 212
 Dillehay, D.L. 148, 172
 Diluzio, M.E. 428
 Dixon, D.M. 496
 Doepel, F.M. 307
 Dohmae, K. 109
 Dolhinow, P. 306
 Donelly, H. 494
 Donkaewbua, S. 118
 Donnelly, H. 156
 Donnelly, T.M. 406
 Dopson, D.C. \u Brompton Hospital, London 302
 Douglas, F. 207
 Doyle, R.E. 351
 Drewsen, K.H. 170
 Drozdowicz, C.K. 142, 145, 267
 Dukelow, W.R. 438
 Dungan, L. 497
 Duzzi, L. 285
 Dysko, R.C. 165
 Eaton, B.D. 5
 Eaton, P. 256
 Edgerton, V.R. 89
 Eichberg, J.W. 160
 Eidson, A.F. 141
 Eisele, P.H. 473
 Eisele, S. 41
 Ekstrom, R. 390
 Eley, R.M. 168
 Elias, K. 262
 Ellender, M. 255
 Elliott, P. 439
 Ellison, G.T.H. 448
 Ellman, G. 444
 Else, J.G. 72, 168
 Else, James G. 287
 Elwell, M.R. 528
 Emerson, C.L. 428
 Epstein, M.A. 425
 ERCI Facilities Service Corp 370
 Ermeling, B. L. 231
 Erwin, J.M. 32
 Espinosa, M.B. 70
 Eveleigh, J.R. 131, 348, 349
 Everitt, J.I. 363, 522
 Fadem, B.H. 437
 Fallon, M.T. 266
 Fanton, J.W. 38
 Farouq, M. 490
 Fenn, C. 60
 Ferguson, B. 138
 Ferguson, F. 155
 Ferrandi, M. 285
 Ferrari, P. 285
 Festing, M. 383
 Festing, M.F.W. 20, 139, 215
 Fincham, J.E. 461
 Fine, J. 28
 Finlay, T.W. 447
 Finney, Martha 309
 Fish, R. E. 231
 Fitzgerald, R.W. 464
 Flato, A. 375
 Flecknell, P.A. 320, 505
 Flint, O. 435
 Ford, G.R. 242
 Ford, J. 53
 Fordham, J.P. 501
 Fortman, J.D. 519
 Fosse, R.T. 7
 Fouts, D.H. 466
 Fouts, R.S. 466
 Fox, J.G. 93, 172, 241, 429, 436, 516
 Fox, J.L. 87
 Fox, M. 324
 Francis, L. 239
 Frazier, J.M. 435
 French, J.A. 405
 Fritz, J. 146
 Frogley, J. 92
 Fukutsu, K. 513
 Fukuyama, N. 193
 Gabert, H.F. 524
 Galef, B.G. Jr 135
 Gallagher, P. 37
 Gamble, M.R. 332
 Ganaway, J.R. 132
 Garcia, F.G. 267
 Gardin, J.F. 323
 Gardner, A. 240
 Gardner, P.S. 423
 Garibaldi, B.A. 516
 Garzon, F.T. 500
 Gaulin, S.J.C. 464
 Gawley, D.J. 29
 Gayek, R.J. 89
 Geistfeld, J.G. 512
 Gettings, S.D. 130, 435
 Gibson, S.V. 132, 371
 Gigliotti, F. 116
 Gilbert, S.G. 180
 Giles, A.R. 49
 Gilmartin, J.E. 188
 Giulietti, M. 431
 Glennon, P.J. 391
 Glodek, P. 58
 Goebel, A. 269
 Goedseels, V. 102
 Goldberg, A.M. 435
 Golden, J.G. 38
 Golemboski, K.A. 185
 Goo, G.P. 394
 Goodfellow, K.G. 78
 Goodwin, W.J. 355, 503
 Goosen, C. 126
 Grady, A.W. 300
 Graves, R.G. 16
 Gray, B.M. 266
 Greeley, E.H. 350
 Green, K. 459
 Green, K.A. 460
 Greenhouse, D.D. 28, 128
 Greenstein, G. 267
 Greenwood, M.R.C. 539
 Greenwood, P. 49
 Greenwood, R. 49
 Greer, I.E. 300
 Griffin, H.E. 150, 484
 Gruber, F. 463
 Habeeb, P. 274
 Haesemeyer, J. 14
 Hahn, F.F. 141
 Hahn, J. 367
 Haines, R.J. 503
 Hall-Craggs, M. 346
 Halsey, M.J. 331
 Hamlen, H.J. 221
 Hamm, Thomas E. 450
 Hammer, J.G. 167, 527
 Hammond, J. 210
 Hammond, K. 225
 Hampson, J.E. 359
 Hanichen, T. 488
 Hankes, G. 381
 Hanninen, O.O. 354
 Hansen, C.T. 128, 312
 Hansen, G. 468
 Hardesty, J. 88
 Hardy, R.J. 95
 Hardy, S. 92
 Hare, C.L. 498
 Haring, D.M. 314, 416
 Harkness, J.E. 421
 Harle, S. 240
 Harms, R.H. 202
 Harris, D.L. 451
 Harris, Duncan 534
 Harris, H.J. 207
 Harvey, R.C. 38
 Harwell, James F. 422
 Havenaar, R. 36
 Hayden, C.C. 253
 Hazelton, J. 407
 Heath, M. 179, 250, 511
 Heath, S.J. 44
 Heberling, R.L. 532
 Hedrich, Hans J. 219
 Hedricks, C. 504
 Heflin, H. 453
 Helmick, C.G. 418
 Henderson, F. 424
 Herbert, J. 471
 Herck, H. van 408
 Herring, J.M. 519
 Herrman, A.D. 493
 Herrmann, Hans-Joachim 233
 Hesp, A.P.M. 36, 408
 Hessler, J.R. 15
 Hetherington, C.M. 345
 Hetts, S. 273
 Higgins, B. 351
 Hill, E.E. 292
 Hill, M. 344
 Hill, R.N. 435
 Hilliard, J.K. 115, 275, 355
 Hinson, A. 90
 Hioki, K. 492
 Hird, D.W. 115
 Hirsjarvi, P.A. 334
 Hitchcock, C.L. 135
 Hiyaoka, A. 467
 Hobbs, B.A. 101
 Hobbs, C.H. 141
 Hobbs, K.R. 106, 465
 Hodara, V.L. 70
 Hodgson, J.A. 89
 Hoffman, R.A. 274
 Hojny, J. 127
 Holden, C. 21, 47, 206
 Holdsworth, G. 434
 Holland, C.J. 428
 Hollifield, V. 312
 Holmes, D.D. 208
 Holmgren, B. 489
 Honjo, S. 467
 Hoof, J.A.P. van 84
 Hoogendoorn, H. 49
 Hoogervorst, M.J.C. 122
 Hoover-Plow, J. 439
 Horlock, H. 37
 Horstman, V.G. 486
 Howard, B.R. 60
 Howell, S.M. 146
 Howland, D.R. 527
 Hoyt, R.F. Jr 62
 Hradecky, J. 127
 Hruban, V. 127
 Huang, M.T.F. 216
 Hubrecht, R.C. 311
 Huerkamp, M.J. 148, 291
 Hughes, H.C. 153, 158, 484
 Hughes, K.W. 137
 Huls, W. 65
 Huls, W.L. 443
 Hunskaar, S. 7
 Hurst, J.K. 201, 292
 Hurwitz, S. 198
 Hynard-Naylor, V. 98
 Iale, E. 431
 Ibu, J.O. 366
 Inouye, S. 195, 373
 International Council for Laboratory Animal Science 219
 International Primatological Society, Captive Care Committee,
 Institute of
 Primate Research (Kenya) 287
 Isaksson, S. 317
 Ito, K. 110
 Ito, M. 51
 Iwai, H. 270
 Izard, M.K. 321, 416
 Jaax, G.P. 10
 Jacobs, R.D. 202
 Jacoby, R.O. 271, 275
 Jaeger, B. 535
 Jaeger, R.G. 247
 Jahrling, P.B. 95
 James Cook University of North Queensland. Experimentation
 Ethics Review
 Committee 227
 Jayo, M.J. 323
 Jerome, C.P. 323
 Joehl, R.J. 358
 Johnson, D.E. 346
 Johnson, E.A. 271
 Johnson, T. 124
 Joiner, G.N. 213
 Joint AAMC-AAU Ad Hoc Committee on the Governance and
 Management of Institutional Animal Resources, Association of
 American Medical Colleges, Association of American
 Universities 427
 Jones, P. 240
 Joshima, H. 513
 Kalter, S.S. 532
 Kamimura, H. 195, 373
 Kansas State University, College of Veterinary Medicine 342
 Kaplan, J.E. 228
 Kaplan, J.R. 378
 Kaplan, M.L. 521
 Karatay, M.C. 498
 Karenlampi, S. 119
 Kasai, N. 520
 Kaspareit-Rittinghausen, J. 490
 Kato, H. 492
 Kaufman, R. 457
 Kava, R. 539
 Kawamata, J. 109
 Keeley, A. 475
 Keeling, M. 344
 Keller, L.S.F. 196
 Kennedy, B.W. 336
 Kenney, C. 153
 Kessler, M.J. 395
 Keymer, I.F. 71
 Kimura, M. 373
 King, F.A. 86, 326
 King, J.E. 214
 King, N.E. 57
 Kingma, I. 276
 Kirk, K. 17
 Kirkwood, J.K. 425
 Kitada, K. 495
 Kleinow, Kevin M. 77
 Klinge, B. 317
 Klir, P. 298, 462
 Klokager, F. 340
 Knauff, D.R. 24, 226
 Knitter, G.H. 8
 Koshimizu, K. 51
 Kovacs, P.R. 120
 Krackow, S. 463
 Kranda, K.C. 181
 Kraus, D.B. 437
 Krugner, L. 390
 Kruijt, B.C. 187
 Krulisch, Lee 77
 Kumazawa, A. 110
 Kuntz, M.J. 117
 Kunz, H.W. 120
 Kupp, R.P. Jr 150
 Kurata, T. 109
 Kurihara, K. 110
 Kuzon, W.M. Jr 470
 La Regina, M.C. 387
 La Torre, R. 431
 Laber-Laird, K. 497
 Laboratory Animal Management Association 304, 305
 Ladewig, J. 472
 Ladiges, W.C. 259
 Lai, W.C. 147
 Lambeth, S.P. 337
 Lampeter, E.F. 249
 Landi, M.S. 484
 Lang, C.M. 142, 145, 196, 301, 523
 Lareau-Alves, M. 409
 Larkin, K.T. 378
 Lauretz, S.D. 89
 Lawrence, J.M. 221
 Lawrence, W. 155
 Leamon, C. 65
 Leary, S.L. 154
 Lebetkin, E.H. 525
 Lee, D.R. 160, 384
 Lee, H.W. 109
 Lee, S. 381
 Leedy, M. 3
 Lees, V.W. 114
 Lehman, S.M. 379
 Lehner, N.D.M. 148
 Lerche, N.W. 115
 Lessnau, R.G. 379
 Levin, J.L. 355
 Lewin, L. 468
 Lewis, L.L. 267
 Lewis, S.M. 99
 Libretto, S.E. 179
 Liebenberg, Stanley P. 68
 Lighty, G.W. Jr 498
 Lin, P.J. 470
 Lindsay, J.R. 352
 Lindsey, J.R. 27, 266, 392
 Line, A.S. 473
 Line, S. 178, 399
 Line, S.W. 152, 161, 194, 272, 444
 Lipman, N.S. 93, 100, 149, 157, 197, 335, 429
 Lipnick, R.L. 435
 Lipper, S.L. 355
 Little, L.A. 540
 Liu, J.J. 350
 Lloyd, Maggie 235
 Lobao, B.J. 521
 Lockatell, C.V. 346
 Lofgreen, P.E. Jr 105
 London 5
 Looy, H. van 339
 Losco, P.E. 111
 Love, J.A. 223, 225
 Loveridge, G. 413
 Lu, Y.S. 147
 Lucas, G.A. 29
 Luff, N.P. 331
 Lukas, V. 410
 Luke, D.R. 290
 Lukey, C. 114
 Macedonia, J.M. 314
 Machii, K. 270
 Maclean, C.J. 331
 Mader, D.R. 316
 Maerki, U. 104
 Mallon, F.M. 484
 Management Information Service 309
 Mangkoewidjojo, Soesanto 79
 Mansfield, K.J. 249
 Manuck, S.B. 378
 Maple, T.L. 447
 Markowitz, H. 152, 178, 194, 272, 393, 399, 444
 Marshall, P.E. 74, 411
 Martelossi, P. 333
 Martinic, G. 205
 Maruo, K. 492
 Mason, R.T. 62
 Mason, W.A. 277
 Mateo, J.M. 273
 Matherne, C. 344
 Matsumoto, T. 513
 Matsushita, S. 513
 Matthews, D.A. 315
 McAnulty, P. 53
 McCauley, P. 434
 McClintock, M.K. 504
 McConnell, P.B. 52
 McConomy, M. 356
 McCully, C. 143
 McEwen, G.N. Jr 130
 McFarland, A.R. 213
 McGregor, P.K. 531
 McKay, Donald G. 541
 McKee, N.H. 470
 McLaughlin, R.M. 43, 300, 371
 McLaughlin, S. 508
 McNab, A.M. 411
 Mello, D.A. 55
 Mench, J.A. 174
 Menkveld, R. 461
 Merani, M.S. 70
 Mercier, O. 330
 Merhalski, J.J. 447
 Mew, J.A. 5
 Meyerson, B.J. 191
 Michaelis, O.E. 128
 Milite, G. 333
 Millar, J.S. 144
 Miller, B. 167
 Miller, J.G. 151, 533
 Miller, L. 39, 369, 506
 Milligan, S.R. 183
 Mitchell, G. 57
 Miyamoto, H. 109
 Miyazawa, H. 195, 373
 Miyoshi, I. 520
 Moberg, G.P. 277
 Molzen, E.M. 405
 Moody, K.D. 301
 Moore, P.B. 458
 Moore, R.T. 239
 Morck, Douglas W. 322
 Morgan, J.P. 473
 Morgan, K.N. 152, 161, 194, 272
 Morgan, Ronald L. 81
 Morgenstern, S. 275
 Morris, K.D. 445
 Morton, D.B. 6, 313
 Morton, W.R. 8
 Moseley, J.R. 414
 Moyer, J.L. 99
 Moynier, B. 439
 Muller, G. 357
 Munda, M. 420
 Muraguchi, T. 495
 Murray, L.W. 499
 Murthy, K.K. 237
 Musto, D.R.T. 516
 Nabrotzky, Viola C. A. 322
 Nakayama, M. 110
 Namioka, S. 520
 Natarajan, V. 324
 Naylor, V.H. 485
 Nazareno, J.B. 106
 Neal, S.B. 189
 Needham, J.R. 332
 Neel, M.A. 540
 Neil, David H. 541
 Nesbitt, T. 269
 New England Regional Primate Research Center 176
 Newcomer, C.E. 429
 Newton, C.M. 325
 Nicholls, S. 449
 Nicklas, W. 278
 NIH Office of Animal Care and Use 353
 Nikkels, R.J. 204
 Nilsson, R. 535
 Nomura, T. 492
 Norwood, V.R. 214
 Novak, M.A. 170, 417, 479
 O'Byrne, K.T. 445
 O'Neill, P. 125, 171, 452
 Obara, T. 193
 Ocholi, R.A. 366
 Odeyemi, P.S. 530
 Ohlsson-Wilhelm, B.M. 142
 Okewole, P.A. 530
 Olovson, S.G. 134
 Olson, G.A. 90
 Olson, L.C. 377
 Olson, Merle E. 322
 Omarini, D. 343
 Orr, R. 114
 Oskar, P.A. 165
 Otsuka, Y. 270
 Oyetunde, I.L. 530
 Pablo, L. 381
 Pace, M. 431
 Pakes, S.P. 147
 Panepinto, L.M. 303
 Pannell, L.K. 62
 Panneton, W.M. 351
 Pape, D. 265
 Parenti, P. 285
 Parham, G.L. 418
 Parker, J. 65
 Parks, J.E. 376
 Parnham, D.W. 163
 Patella, A. 431
 Paturzo, F.X. 140, 271
 Paul, K.S. 172
 Pazdera, J. 127
 Pearce, P.C. 331
 Pearson, S.L. 95
 Pelkonen, K. 119
 Pence, B.C. 162
 Peng, X. 142
 People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals 50
 Peper, R. 155
 Percy, D.H. 140, 487
 Pereira, M.E. 314, 398, 491
 Perloe, S.I. 108
 Perraud, J. 330
 Perry, F.W. 75
 Peters, A. 383
 Peters, A.G. 139, 385, 529
 Peters, C.J. 95
 Peters, P.W.J. 53
 Peterson, R.G. 539, 540
 Petrie, B.F. 524
 Petto, A.J. 409
 Pieper, R.D. 499
 Pierotti, D.J. 89
 Pinto, C.A. 150
 Plant, M. 364
 Podberscek, A.L. 46, 159
 Pomsdhit, J. 528
 Poole, T.B. 45
 Poole, Trevor B. 518
 Pouch, W. 496
 Pozzilli, P. 249
 Pribylova, M. 462
 Prove, E. 380
 Pryor, W.H. Jr 377
 Psencik, B. 384
 Pucak, G. 482
 Pucak, G.J. 95
 Pucak, George 422
 Purhoit, R. 381
 Purton, P. 5
 Quander, R.V. 95
 Quezada, A. 454
 Quimby, F.W. 28, 188
 Quintans, C. 70
 Raff, R.F. 259
 Raisbeck, M.F. 371
 Ralston, P. 428
 Rao, G.N. 27
 Rasmussen, K.L.R. 258
 Ratcliffe, B. 501
 Ratnamohan, N. 318
 Raymond, R.T. 239
 Redfern, R. 537
 Rehg, J.E. 116
 Rehm, S. 34
 Reinhard, G.R. 458
 Reinhard, M.K. 266
 Reinhardt, A. 419
 Reinhardt, V. 41, 182, 198, 265, 419, 476, 514
 Reinhart, V. 200
 Renskers, K.J. 435
 Resuello, R.G. 106
 Revis, N.W. 434
 Riboni, L. 489
 Richard, B.C. 162
 Richards, T. 37
 Richmond, J.Y. 236
 Ricker, R.B. 61
 Ricketts, T. 356
 Ridley, M. 362
 Robbins, D.O. 3
 Robbins, L. \u National Radiological Protection Board,
 Chilton, Didcot 255
 Roberts, J. 316
 Roberts, J.A. 115
 Roberts, K. 329
 Roberts, P.J. 376
 Roberts, S.C. 478
 Robinson, Ruth, 518
 Rogers, D.W. 75
 Rohrhuber, B. 136
 Rolhall, T.G. 101
 Romeo, J.P. 351
 Rose, E.F. 112
 Rose, R. 93
 Rosenblatt, J.D. 470
 Roser, B. 471
 Ross, J.A.S. 331
 Ross, P.W. 363, 522
 Rossbach, W. 104
 Rouda, R.R. 499
 Rouleau, A.M.J. 120
 Rowan, A.N. 432
 Rowe, F.P. 537
 Roy, R.R. 89
 Royal Society (Great Britain),Universities Federation for
 Animal Welfare 230
 Rubin, L.F. 150
 Rumbaugh, D.M. 368
 Russell, K. 409
 Russell, R.G. 390
 Russell, R.J. 139
 Ruys, T. 289
 Ruys, Theodorus, 234
 Ryden, E.B. 93
 Sachser, N. 380
 Saifuddin, M. 197
 Sainsbury, A.W. 5
 Saito, M. 492
 Sakaguchi, M. 195, 373
 Sakakibara, A. 430
 Salardi, S. 285
 Sales, G.D. 183
 Salzen, E.A. 91
 Samuel, I. 358
 Sanders, P.D. 13
 Sauber, J.J. 38
 Sauvageau, G. 124
 Savage, A. 52, 415
 Savage-Rumbaugh, E.S. 368
 Sawyer, B.A. 525
 Schaarschmidt, K. 357
 Schachtman, T.R. 43
 Schaeffer, Dorcas O. 77
 Scharmann, W. 66, 263
 Scheffler, J. 41
 Scheid, R. 488
 Scher, S. 474
 Schlag, P. 500
 Schlingmann, F. 341
 Schmahl, D. 500
 Schmidt, Peter 220
 Schmidt, R.H. 536
 Schmitt, K. 8
 Schmorrow, D.D. 264
 Schneider, S. 500
 Schoeb, T.R. 352
 Schofield, J.C. 137, 404
 Schofield, L.D. 372
 Schultz, T.W. 299
 Scientists Center for Animal Welfare, Louisiana State
 University (Baton Rouge, La.), School of Veterinary Medicine
 77
 Scott, O.C.A. 386
 Scullion, F.T. 254
 Sebesteny, A. 333
 Secord, D.C. 96
 Sedlacek, R.S. 112
 Segal, Evalyn F. 245
 Seier, J.V. 461
 Semple, H.A. 96
 Semple-Rowland, S.L. 446
 Serikawa, T. 495
 Severance C.W. 493
 Shadduck, J.A. 350
 Shiga, J. 51
 Shimamura, K. 492
 Shroeder, E.C. 299
 Shull, C.L. 248
 Sibbons, P. 92
 Sigg, H. 374
 Silbernagel, S.M. 212
 Silverman, J. 23, 252
 Simack, P.A. 164
 Simmonds, R.C. 151, 533
 Simons, E.L. 314, 321, 416
 Skarpa, M. 423
 Skoglund, E. 433
 Sloan, D.R. 202
 Smith, A.C. 497
 Smith, A.L. 83
 Smith, John B., 79
 Smith, L.C. 163
 Smith, M.W. 293
 Smith, P.M. 8
 Snider, M.T. 196
 Snowdon, C.T. 52, 415
 Soave, O. 260
 Sobotka, T.J. 238
 Solleveld, H.A. 53
 Solomon, H.F. 496
 Southers, Jan 360
 Spano, J. 381
 Spear, R.S. 498
 Spencer, A.J. 133
 Spencer, K.E.V. 183
 Spilman, S.C. 165
 Spinelli, J.S. 393
 Sprenkel, T.L. 101
 St. Louis, MO 387
 Stadler, J. 330
 Stanek, R. 127
 Stanton, J. 423
 Stark, D.M. 391, 458
 Stearns, G. 3
 Steffen, E.K. 43
 Stein, S. 2
 Stevenson, M.F. 73
 Stewart, T.S. 451
 Stiglmair-Herb, M.T. 488
 Stokes, D.C. 116
 Storb, R. 259
 Stott, E. 250
 Strange, G.M. 292
 Stratmann, U. 357
 Stribrny, K. 472
 Strong, S. 152, 194, 272
 Suh, J.G. 54
 Suit, H.D. 112
 Suleman, M.A. 129, 168
 Suomi, S. 388
 Suomi, S.J. 417, 479
 Susor, T.G. 8, 262
 Sutherland, S.D. 423
 Suzuki, S. 492
 Svoboda, T. 462
 Swindle, M.M. 497
 Sydney, Australia 205
 Taff, M.A. 306
 Takahaski, M. 109
 Tam, Y.K. 96
 Tamborini, P. 374
 Tarara, R. 168
 Tasheva, M. 535
 Taylor, N.S. 93
 Tennant, B.C. 376
 Tenney, J.B. 75
 Terao, K. 467
 Terlecki, A.J. 425
 Terril, Lizabeth A. 232
 Tesh, J. 53
 Texas Tech University, Health Sciences Center 25
 Tezak-Reid, T.M. 10
 Thigpen, J.E. 525
 Thomas, G. 344
 Thomas, J.M. 377
 Thomson, J. 65
 Thornbury, J. 92
 Threadgill, D.A.L. 144
 Timberlake, W. 29, 211
 Tingpalapong, M. 528
 Tinlin, S.J. 49
 Tolbert, D. 387
 Tomita, T. 54, 430
 Toms, M.P. 524
 Torielli, L. 285
 Toriumi, Y. 358
 Torronen, R. 119
 Toth, L. 90
 Tressel, W.R. 524
 Trippodo, N.C. 324
 Troup, C.M. 111
 Tsai, C.C. 390, 428
 Tufts, N.R. 260
 Turillazzi, P. 431
 Twomey, S. 65
 Uberseder, B. 378
 Uche, E.M.I. 530
 Ueda, K. 270
 Ueda, T. 193
 Ueng, T.H. 151
 Ulrich, R.E. 264
 Underwood, S.J. 425
 Undeutsch, L. 154
 United States, Congress, House, Committee on Agriculture,
 Subcommittee on
 Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry 22
 United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture 209
 United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture.
 Subcommittee on
 Department Operations, Research, and Foreign Agriculture 22
 Universities Federation for Animal Welfare 517, 518, 534
 University of California, Davis, Visual Media, University of
 California, Davis, Office of Pesticide Information and
 Coordination 455
 University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational Resources 422
 University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational Resources, American College of Laboratory Animal
 Medicine, National
 Agricultural Library
 (U.S.) 231, 232, 361
 University of Washington, Northwest Committee for Training in
 Laboratory Animal
 Care, University of Washington, Health Sciences Center for
 Educational
 Resources 68
 University of Washington, Primate Information Center 67
 Urba-Holmgren, R. 489
 Vadiei, K. 290
 Valerio, D.A. 482
 Valiaho, T.U. 334
 Van Oorschot, R.A.H. 217
 VandeBerg, J.L. 217
 Vega-SaenzdeMiera, E.C. 489
 Venter, F.S. 461
 Versluis, A. 408
 Vogel, A.P. 10
 Vogler, G.A. 351
 Vorstenbosch, C.J.A.H.V. van 122
 Vranken, E. 102
 Waalkes, M.P. 34
 Waggie, K.S. 132, 312
 Wagner, J.E. 118, 132, 371, 538
 Wagner, Joseph E. 232
 Wagner-Mann, C. 381
 Wakabayashi, T. 110
 Wakasugi, N. 430
 Wallace, M.E. 347
 Waller, T. 186
 Walsh-Mullen, A. 406
 Walther, A. 104
 Ward, G.E. 177
 Ward, G.S. 528
 Ward, J.M. 34
 Warren, J.W. 346
 Washburn, D. 368
 Washburne, D.L. 211
 Watson, B.J. 351
 Watson, D.S.B. 59
 Watson, L. 409
 Watson, Lyna M. 176
 Weaver, D.S. 323
 Webb, A.J. 12
 Webb, M.L. 145
 Weichbrod, R.H. 151, 533
 Weichbrod, Robert H. 26
 Weigler, B.J. 115
 Weihe, W.H. 246
 Weir, E.C. 164, 271, 275
 Weiss, D. 384
 Wellner, E.F. 62
 Welshman, M.D. 106, 319
 Wemelsfelder, F. 11
 Wesonga, H.O. 420
 West, D.B. 539
 Westlin-Van Aarde, L.M. 448
 Whary, M. 155
 White, R.G. 118
 White, W.J. 196, 523
 Whitefield, D. 469
 Whittaker, D. 261
 Whittemore, A. 210
 Wiebe, R.H. 407
 Wightman, S.R. 189
 Wilcockson, D.P. 358
 Williams, A.J.K. 249
 Williams, H.L. 348
 Williams, L.E. 61, 257
 Williams-Blangero, S. 217, 237, 441
 Wills, J.E. 356
 Wilson, K.J. 183
 Wilson, M.S. 402
 Winkler, W.G. 418
 Witz, R.L. 124
 Wolfensohn, Sarah 235
 Wolff, D. 66
 Wood, M. 325
 Woods, L. 387
 Wootton, R. 19, 424, 505
 Wrenshall, E. 180
 Wright, P.C. 416
 Wright, Phyllis 309
 Wu, D. 213
 Wu-Owens, J. 312
 Wullenweber, M. 490
 Yamada, J. 495
 Yamamoto, K. 51
 Yamanishi, K. 109
 Yamanouchi, T. 109
 Yamashita, T. 520
 Yamauchi, C. 193
 Yamazaki, A. 54
 Yamazaki, K. 110, 430
 Yamazaki, S. 195, 373
 Yamini, B. 2
 Yap, K.L. 76
 Yarbrough, C.J. 326
 Yates-Siilata, K. 387
 Yokel, Uri 296
 Zack, P.M. 95
 Zafiriou, N. 205
 Zaoutis, T.E. 458
 Zimmer, J.P. 99
 Zutphen, L.F.M. van 36, 122, 408
 Zwart, P. 408
 Zweifel, D. 265
 Zwick, H. 3
 


Go to: Author Index | Subject Index | Top of Document


Subject Index

 Abnormal behavior 126, 161, 388, 412
 Abortion 2
 Acclimatization 141
 Accounting 505
 Accreditation 293, 295
 Acid base equilibrium 343
 Acquisition 104
 Activity 64, 125, 469
 Adaptation 121
 Adrenal cortex hormones 277
 Adrenal glands 4, 64
 Adverse effects 325
 Age 98, 350, 519, 527
 Age determination 519
 Age differences 115, 257, 447
 Aggressive behavior 476, 531
 Aging 110, 310
 Air 195
 Air filters 195, 340
 Air flow 149, 193
 Air microbiology 193
 Air pollution 373
 Air quality 149
 Air transport 147
 Albumins 195
 Allergens 195, 373
 Allergies 7, 193, 373
 Americium 255
 Amimal welfare 287
 Ammonia 100, 157, 193
 Amphibians 233
 Amphibians as laboratory animals 77, 233
 Amputation 137
 Analgesics 320
 Anastomosis 92
 Anemia 473
 Anesthesia 101, 302, 329, 343, 426
 Anesthetics 97, 320, 345
 Anestrus 463
 Animal anatomy 283
 Animal behavior 11, 42, 44, 45, 46, 64, 91, 98, 126, 136, 143,
 160, 161, 169, 173, 174, 175, 177, 181, 191, 201, 203, 223,
 224, 225, 238, 269, 272, 273, 277, 306, 326, 341, 380, 400,
 405, 412, 491
 Animal breeding 12, 20, 48, 53, 54, 56, 57, 58, 70, 73, 87,
 91, 106, 128, 134, 138, 164, 186, 187, 188, 215, 218, 244,
 254, 259, 275, 283, 293, 298, 299, 301, 326, 345, 382, 385,
 386, 394, 406, 425, 426, 436, 439, 441, 467, 482, 492, 494,
 529, 538, 539, 540
 Animal breeding methods 52, 55, 189, 321, 494
 Animal burrows 274
 Animal diseases 261, 448
 Animal experimentation 25, 26, 50, 230, 235, 361
 Animal experiments 23, 24, 33, 44, 104, 178, 183, 190, 206,
 223, 226, 229, 236, 246, 283, 286, 294, 298, 308, 341, 351,
 373, 401, 418, 424, 433, 440, 441, 442, 453, 457, 471, 479,
 485, 497, 515
 Animal feeding 76, 91, 254, 402, 405, 475
 Animal health 196, 229, 252, 264, 280, 284, 286, 319, 328,
 351, 366, 468
 Animal housing 9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18, 28, 36, 39, 45, 51, 52,
 53, 56, 61, 76, 85, 91, 98, 102, 103, 117, 119, 122, 123, 124,
 125, 126, 136, 146, 153, 158, 171, 174, 175, 183, 184, 191,
 193, 205, 214, 226, 230, 239, 241, 243, 246, 247, 248, 254,
 256, 258, 268, 269, 273, 274, 279, 280, 281, 284, 286, 288,
 289, 301, 310, 311, 314, 319, 327, 328, 329, 332, 340, 341,
 356, 359, 368, 373, 377, 378, 380, 388, 389, 398, 405, 412,
 413, 417, 426, 432, 433, 447, 449, 452, 456, 459, 472, 475,
 477, 479, 480, 482, 485, 491, 502, 505, 510, 522, 524
 Animal husbandry 19, 36, 51, 55, 66, 70, 71, 87, 106, 129,
 152, 167, 205, 241, 247, 248, 254, 255, 264, 278, 280, 283,
 284, 297, 298, 299, 302, 303, 315, 319, 327, 334, 345, 351,
 367, 382, 392, 402, 413, 421, 449, 459, 482, 497, 505, 529,
 537
 Animal models 89, 92, 110, 302, 346, 358, 435, 497, 539, 540
 Animal nutrition 28, 134, 247, 286, 301, 303
 Animal production 20
 Animal proteins 54
 Animal research 24, 167, 269, 314, 399, 460
 Animal rights activists 209
 Animal testing alternatives 33, 130, 190, 338, 339
 Animal welfare 5, 6, 11, 13, 21, 22, 24, 25, 32, 42, 45, 47,
 50, 53, 64, 67, 68, 69, 75, 78, 79, 81, 85, 94, 107, 121, 152,
 153, 158, 160, 161, 169, 170, 171, 173, 174, 178, 179, 182,
 183, 190, 192, 194, 201, 206, 218, 223, 227, 229, 230, 235,
 243, 245, 248, 250, 251, 254, 262, 263, 264, 272, 273, 286,
 288, 303, 307, 308, 309, 313, 320, 322, 328, 347, 353, 354,
 358, 359, 360, 363, 364, 389, 398, 401, 403, 409, 411, 412,
 413, 415, 416, 417, 419, 422, 432, 442, 443, 450, 456, 457,
 466, 479, 481, 482, 483, 484, 502, 507, 515, 523, 531, 534,
 536
 Animals 309, 509, 510
 Animals and civilization 309
 Animals, Treatment of 50
 Ankylosis 27
 Anoplura 316
 Antibiotics 97
 Antibody formation 185
 Antibody titer 109, 270, 525
 Antiserum 356
 Architecture 296
 Arteries 500
 Artificial insemination 199, 438
 Artificial ventilation 202
 Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase 119
 Ascorbic acid 473
 Aseptic state 404
 Aspergillus fumigatus 34
 Aspiculuris 325
 Assays 185
 Assessment 535
 Ataxia 489
 Atherosclerosis 37
 Attachment behavior 511
 Australia 382, 426
 Authority 104
 Autoimmune diseases 244
 Automation 39, 499
 Aviary birds 71
 Baboons 168, 355, 503
 Bacillus 513
 Bacillus piliformis 132
 Bacillus subtilis 332
 Bacteria 193, 392, 468
 Bacterial diseases 346, 366
 Bacterial toxins 93
 Barrier husbandry 429
 Barriers 256, 538
 Battery cages 192
 Behavior 135
 Behavior change 126, 161
 Benzopyrene 151
 Bibliographies 248, 294, 509, 510
 Bibliography 67, 67
 Biliary calculi 36
 Biochemistry 48
 Biographies 80
 Biological competition 113
 Biology 71
 Bladder 346
 Blood 343, 431, 507
 Blood chemistry 237
 Blood groups 467
 Blood plasma 4, 142, 145, 380, 502
 Blood pressure 331
 Blood sampling 41
 Blood serum 527
 Blood specimen collection 445, 472, 498
 Blood sugar 257
 Boars 58
 Body temperature 4, 101
 Body weight 98
 Bone diseases 473
 Boophilus annulatus 63
 Boredom 11
 Bottles 177
 Boxes 1, 280, 281
 Brain 420
 Brazil 55
 Breed differences 365
 Breeders' associations 293
 Breeding 51, 79, 401
 Breeding efficiency 127, 365, 430
 Breeding methods 20, 144, 437, 512
 Breeding programs 37, 49, 53, 58, 72, 86, 285, 451, 465, 526
 Breeding season 362, 407, 504
 Breeds 365
 Building materials 61
 Bulls 242
 Buyers' guides 1
 Caesarean section 275
 Cage density 142, 153, 348, 349, 383
 Cage rearing 53, 168, 393
 Cage size 13, 61, 85, 108, 143, 152, 153, 173, 194, 203, 272,
 402, 464, 466, 523
 Cages 1, 3, 5, 8, 27, 32, 35, 41, 45, 46, 47, 59, 62, 63, 64,
 65, 66, 69, 82, 91, 100, 112, 126, 131, 148, 149, 151, 157,
 159, 160, 169, 170, 173, 175, 177, 179, 180, 196, 197, 206,
 208, 213, 214, 238, 241, 243, 262, 263, 264, 265, 273, 277,
 280, 281, 284, 294, 306, 327, 329, 330, 331, 334, 335, 340,
 341, 345, 347, 363, 364, 368, 371, 374, 399, 400, 411, 415,
 416, 417, 419, 421, 429, 443, 446, 452, 469, 470, 475, 481,
 483, 491, 498, 501, 511, 516, 521, 522, 525, 531, 537, 538
 California 115, 473, 536
 Callithricidae 52, 73, 136, 254, 405, 415, 425
 Callithrix jacchus 176, 179
 Calomys 70
 Campylobacter 172, 390
 Canada 508
 Canaries 71
 Canine parvovirus 188
 Cannibalism 211
 Cannulae 357
 Cannulation 357, 500
 Capture of animals 80, 170, 258, 314, 329, 368, 405, 415, 416,
 452
 Carbon 186
 Carbon dioxide 100, 157
 Carcinoma 51
 Care and treatment 79
 Careproviders 306, 509, 510
 Case reports 95, 420, 473, 516
 Cat 134, 252, 283
 Catheters 346, 472, 481
 Cats 89, 391, 413, 527
 Cats as laboratory animals 81
 Cattle 472, 499
 Cattle feeding 499
 Caudata 247
 Cebidae 416
 Cecum 93, 172
 Cedrus 151
 Cell culture 119
 Cell physiology 147, 492
 Cells 387
 Censuses 14
 Cephalopoda 517
 Cercopithecidae 72, 306, 452, 461, 467
 Cerebellar ataxia 387
 Cerebellum 387, 420
 Chicken housing 244
 Chickens 48, 185, 199, 210
 Chicks 278
 Chimeras 520
 Chimpanzee 86, 87, 160, 368, 389, 456, 466
 Chimpanzees 146, 237, 337, 369, 447
 Chinese hamster 189
 Chlorpyrifos 162
 Cholinesterase 154, 520
 Classification 28
 Cleaning 256
 Climate 102
 Climate control 268
 Clostridium difficile 93
 Clostridium tetani 503
 Clustering 523
 Coat 520
 Coccidiosis 366
 Colitis 397
 Colon 172, 500
 Colon (Anatomy) 397
 Colonies 165, 267
 Color 520
 Colostomy 75
 Committees 24
 Computer applications 14, 105, 367, 374, 424, 524
 Computer hardware 88
 Computer software 23, 60, 88, 104, 105, 114, 505
 Computer techniques 104, 506
 Computers 19, 102
 Conception 463
 Congresses 42, 42, 42
 Contamination 371, 462, 538
 Control 309
 Controlled release 162
 Convulsions 110
 Copulation 138
 Cornea 111
 Coronavirus 83, 271
 Corticosterone 4, 142, 145, 147, 502
 Cortisol 484
 Cost analysis 289
 Costs 47, 223, 494
 Cottonseed protein 499
 Crates 192
 Creatine kinase 54
 Criminal procedure 22
 Crosses 163, 430
 Crossing 12
 Cryptosporidium 116
 Culling 377
 Cysticercus 118
 Cysts 118
 Cytotoxicity 119
 Czechoslovakia 298
 Dairy farms 493
 Damage 446
 Data analysis 311
 Data collection 19, 440
 Decision making 535
 Decontamination 120, 256
 Degeneration 150
 Deprivation 485
 Dermatitis 496, 516
 Design 3, 61, 62, 63, 66, 82, 96, 124, 131, 168, 203, 262,
 268, 334, 340, 356, 368, 411, 413
 Detection 148
 Detectors 374
 Developmental stages 437
 Diabetes 372
 Diabetes mellitus 90, 539, 540
 Diagnosis 133, 261, 473
 Diarrhea 76, 93, 221
 Dichlorvos 154
 Diet 5, 434
 Diets 1, 36, 37, 134, 135, 306, 311, 314, 345, 368, 416, 475
 Dimensions 519
 Directories 1, 295
 Discrimination 238
 Disease control 71, 109, 118, 164, 165, 186, 188, 377, 402,
 418
 Disease course 271
 Disease models 51, 54, 76, 244, 326, 387, 498
 Disease prevalence 115, 391, 495
 Disease prevention 148, 228, 254, 327, 332, 421, 468
 Disease resistance 140, 185
 Disease surveys 495, 532
 Disease transmission 118, 140, 228, 270, 271, 275, 350, 513
 Disinfectants 434
 Disinfection 256, 455
 Disinfection and disinfectants 455
 Displays 533
 Diurnal activity 523
 Dna fingerprinting 139
 Dogs 47, 49, 69, 75, 153, 158, 184, 188, 252, 259, 273, 482,
 484
 Dogs as laboratory animals 81
 Domestic animals 209, 526
 Domestication 51
 Drinkers 336
 Drinking behavior 499
 Drinking water 336, 402, 434
 Drug combinations 101
 Drug delivery systems 99, 276
 Drug therapy 90, 500
 Drugs 424
 Ducks 199
 Dust 193
 Ebola virus 95
 Echocardiography 498
 Ecology 68
 Ectoparasitoses 63, 316
 Education 167, 354
 Eimeria 366
 Elapidae 449
 Electric field 486
 Electrical equipment 470
 Electricity 470, 493
 Electrocardiograms 331
 Electrocardiography 10
 Electroejaculation 461
 Electroencephalograms 331
 Elemental diets 357
 Elisa 458
 Embryo transfer 120
 Embryos 120, 527
 Embryos (animal) 30
 Employment 166, 167
 Encephalitis 429
 Encephalitozoon cuniculi 186, 267, 350, 420
 Endangered species 73, 86, 254, 425, 456
 Endoplasmic reticulum 488
 Energy conservation 493
 England 359
 Enrichment 9, 65, 85, 152, 161, 169, 173, 174, 177, 179, 181,
 182, 194, 201, 224, 337, 364, 379, 395, 398, 400, 413, 443,
 444, 447, 476
 Enterocolitis 172
 Enterotoxins 92
 Entopolypoides 428
 Environment 9, 85, 125, 152, 160, 161, 170, 174, 175, 177,
 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 191, 194, 200, 201, 203,
 206, 214, 224, 241, 280, 314, 345, 363, 373, 379, 395, 398,
 399, 413, 415, 416, 444, 447, 452, 483, 511, 525
 Environmental control 18, 124, 268
 Environmental factors 32, 121, 173, 275, 412, 432
 Environmental temperature 100, 475
 Enzyme activity 54, 151
 Epilepsy 489
 Epizootiology 275, 355
 Equipment 1, 175, 204, 208, 340, 368, 445, 471, 501
 Erythrocytes 520
 Escherichia coli 172, 366
 Estradiol 407
 Estrous cycle 57, 438
 Estrus 330, 463, 504
 Ethics 190, 191, 401, 433
 Etiology 82
 Europe 307, 341
 European communities 222, 341
 Euthanasia 284, 426
 Evaluation 130, 338
 Evaluation criteria 166
 Evaporative cooling 202
 Exercise 47, 91, 153, 180, 466, 483, 484
 Experiments 346
 Exploration 174
 Exports 465
 Eye diseases 111
 Eyes (animal) 150
 Facilities 14, 21, 33, 44, 47, 49, 80, 105, 106, 107, 109,
 116, 125, 126, 132, 133, 150, 166, 167, 178, 199, 204, 228,
 252, 253, 260, 268, 269, 278, 279, 282, 289, 295, 297, 308,
 313, 314, 332, 354, 368, 372, 389, 396, 404, 418, 426, 445,
 460, 465, 466, 471, 483, 486, 533
 Falco 199
 Fearfulness 159
 Feathers 210
 Feces 507
 Feces collection 357
 Feed dispensers 175, 280
 Feed formulation 76
 Feeding 135
 Feeding behavior 29, 211, 412, 478
 Feeds 119
 Feline immunodeficiency virus 391
 Feline oncovirus 391
 Female animals 430
 Female fertility 430
 Fenbendazole 384
 Ferrets 66, 116, 241, 301, 436
 Ferrets as laboratory animals 81
 Fertilization 438
 Fetal death 2, 430
 Fetal development 519
 Fetus 86
 Field experimentation 212
 File management 103, 208
 Fines (Penalties) 209
 Finland 354
 Fish as laboratory animals 77
 Fistula 358
 Floor pens 224, 250
 Floors 35, 131, 207, 279, 468
 Florida 202
 Food intake 29
 Food preferences 135
 Foraging 194, 405
 Foreign bodies 346
 Formaldehyde 332
 Fowls 244
 Free range husbandry 499
 Freezing 30
 Freshwater fishes 300
 Frogs 426
 Fumigation 332, 333
 Gases 149, 196, 343
 Gene frequency 217
 Genera 57
 Genes 54, 492
 Genetic control 385, 386
 Genetic defects 408
 Genetic differences 217
 Genetic effects 237
 Genetic engineering 218
 Genetic markers 441
 Genetic polymorphism 217
 Genetic resistance 490
 Genetic variation 12, 237, 285, 441
 Genetics 215, 467, 538
 Genotype environment interaction 185
 Genotypes 492
 Gerbils 132, 496
 Gerbils as laboratory animals 342
 Germ free husbandry 53, 298, 501
 Germfree animals 120, 495
 Germfree state 120
 Gestation period 154
 Giardia 221
 Giardiasis 221
 Gnotobiotic animals 112, 204, 333
 Goats 63
 Golden hamster 274
 Golden hamsters 35, 276
 Granules 162
 Great Britain 94, 94, 94
 Group behavior 46, 125, 306
 Group size 362, 523
 Groups 155, 223, 224, 258, 310, 394, 477, 480
 Growth 70, 436
 Growth rate 156, 224, 383
 Guidelines 192, 228, 229, 341, 401
 Guides 226
 Guinea pigs 131, 187, 231, 232, 366, 380, 513, 523, 530
 Habitats 466
 Hamsters 93, 138, 172, 324
 Handling 35, 52, 66, 91, 159, 228, 239, 254, 261, 283, 284,
 286, 302, 345, 351, 454
 Hazards 218
 Health hazards 537
 Heart rate 101, 272, 378
 Hematology 327
 Hemoglobin 257
 Hemophilia 49
 Herds 486
 Hereditary diseases 244, 387
 Heritability 237, 441
 Herpesviridae 38, 115, 275, 377
 Herpetoviridae 228, 355
 Heterozygosity 217
 Histopathology 34, 93, 111, 116, 132, 164, 172, 352, 420, 423,
 462, 488
 History 80, 307
 Hocks 27
 Horses 381
 Housing 42, 50, 67, 67, 68, 68, 94, 176, 245, 455
 Housing temperature and humidity 121
 Human-animal relationships 309
 Hunting 536
 Hybrids 386
 Hydrocortisone 41
 Hydroxylases 151
 Hymenolepis nana 325
 Hyperlipemia 37
 Hypertension 285
 Hypoglycemia 257
 Identification 5, 258, 280, 284, 345, 355, 401
 Ileum 92
 Immobilization 3
 Immune competence 31, 185
 Immunity 140, 271
 Immunoassay 186, 532
 Immunodiagnosis 377, 458
 Immunofluorescence 428
 Immunogenetics 127, 259
 Immunological deficiency 185
 Immunological diseases 239
 Immunosuppression 145, 377
 Impact 251
 Imported breeds 319
 Imports 319
 Improvement 107, 320
 In vitro 435
 In vitro culture 435
 Inbred lines 127, 385, 408
 Inbred strains 520
 Inbreeding 219
 Incidence 221, 267, 390
 Industry 24
 Infection 118, 390
 Infections 487
 Infectious diseases 97, 326, 392
 Infectivity 270
 Infestation 162
 Information centers 396
 Information processing 40
 Information services 19
 Information systems 339
 Inheritance 467
 Inhibition 113
 Injectable anesthetics 101
 Injection 500
 Injections 327
 Insecticides 316
 Inspection 308
 Institutions 44
 Insulin 90
 Interactions 35
 International cooperation 535
 Inventories 19
 Iodides 434
 Iron 431
 Isoenzymes 520
 Isolation 148, 204, 266, 273, 274, 289, 290, 355, 381, 429,
 462, 529
 Isolation technique 501
 Ivermectin 291
 Japan 109, 193, 270, 495
 Japanese quails 199, 318
 Joints (animal) 27
 Kenya 72, 129, 168, 420
 Kidneys 141, 420
 Kra 534
 Laboratories 21, 22, 124, 180, 183, 207, 209, 222, 294, 333,
 410, 460, 495, 509
 Laboratory animals 1, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19,
 20, 21, 22, 24, 25, 28, 33, 39, 40, 42, 50, 53, 67, 68, 68,
 70, 71, 73, 79, 79, 79, 80, 81, 84, 87, 88, 94, 94, 103, 104,
 105, 107, 109, 114, 117, 119, 121, 123, 129, 158, 166, 167,
 174, 176, 181, 183, 184, 190, 191, 192, 196, 199, 205, 208,
 209, 210, 215, 218, 226, 227, 229, 230, 231, 232, 234, 235,
 246, 251, 253, 256, 260, 261, 263, 278, 279, 281, 282, 286,
 289, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 302, 304, 305, 306, 307,
 308, 313, 318, 320, 322, 332, 335, 336, 340, 344, 353, 354,
 356, 359, 360, 375, 393, 401, 402, 403, 404, 422, 424, 427,
 456, 459, 469, 474, 475, 494, 507, 508, 510, 518, 524, 526,
 533, 537, 541
 Laboratory equipment 17, 18, 210
 Laboratory mammals 409, 412, 419, 488
 Laboratory methods 71, 303, 464
 Laboratory rearing 5, 45, 56, 60, 63, 74, 76, 78, 82, 90, 91,
 144, 187, 190, 211, 240, 242, 243, 246, 249, 300, 301, 310,
 321, 364, 373, 399, 426, 437, 439, 442, 462, 501
 Laboratory tests 525
 Lagomorpha 97
 Lameness 473
 Landrace 127
 Latent infections 43
 Law 47
 Law and legislation 25, 94, 94, 94
 Layout 64
 Learning ability 464
 Legislation 13, 69, 107, 251, 307, 313, 354, 359, 433, 453,
 457, 494
 Lesions 530
 Leukemia 255, 391
 Leukocyte count 145
 Licensing 308, 313
 Life history 247
 Light intensity 446
 Lighting 121, 150, 330, 446, 493
 Literature reviews 185, 412
 Litter 148, 151, 195, 279, 371, 525
 Litter size 58, 144, 154, 156, 365, 430, 463
 Litter traits 365
 Live vaccines 212
 Liver 151
 Liver cells 488
 Livestock 11, 218
 Livestock housing 192
 Liveweight 499
 Lizards 240
 Locomotion 412
 Long term experiments 255, 346, 357
 Longevity 310
 Loose housing 214
 Lymphocyte transformation 484
 Lymphocytes 142, 145, 216
 Lymphoma 312
 Macaca 106, 125, 265, 269, 277, 323, 378, 465
 Macaca arctoides 364
 Macaca fascicularis 5, 95, 176, 275, 428, 431
 Macaca mulatta 10, 38, 41, 115, 152, 161, 176, 182, 198, 201,
 275, 292, 316, 377, 379, 388, 394, 411, 444, 473, 476, 514,
 521
 Maize cobs 151, 195
 Major histocompatibility complex 520
 Malaysia 297
 Male animals 201, 362, 380, 485, 502
 Males 27
 Mammals 28
 Man 35
 Management 49, 75, 84, 88, 114, 282, 305, 394, 424, 474, 529,
 533, 535
 Management units 505
 Managers 166
 Marine invertebrates as laboratory animals 517
 Marmoset 52, 239, 311, 329, 415, 423, 445
 Marmosets 5, 179
 Marmot 51
 Marmota monax 376
 Maternal behavior 504
 Maternal effects 323
 Mating 108
 Mating behavior 113, 504, 538
 Measurement 29, 324, 469, 519
 Mebendazole 325
 Medical research 5, 47, 86, 301, 303, 314, 326, 351, 401, 452,
 491, 497
 Medical treatment 90
 Mental health 328
 Mental stress 414
 Meriones unguiculatus 342
 Metabolic diseases 97
 Metabolism cage 141
 Metals 281
 Methodology 29, 435, 470
 Methyl bromide 333
 Mice 27, 30, 31, 36, 48, 54, 64, 99, 100, 110, 112, 113, 118,
 122, 131, 132, 139, 142, 145, 147, 148, 149, 154, 156, 157,
 162, 163, 164, 177, 195, 197, 216, 249, 252, 255, 266, 312,
 325, 333, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 367, 373, 383, 385,
 386, 392, 406, 429, 430, 439, 448, 454, 463, 471, 480, 487,
 490, 492, 495, 502, 512, 513, 522, 525, 529, 531, 538
 Microbial flora 112
 Microclimate 334
 Microcomputers 103, 375
 Microenvironments 149, 157, 265, 335
 Microsomes 151
 Microtus 464
 Microwaves 370
 Mineral content 336
 Mineral metabolism 431
 Minerals 336
 Miniature pigs 302
 Minks as laboratory animals 81
 Mirrors 337
 Mite control 162
 Mixed infections 95, 391
 Mobile equipment 17
 Models 166, 310, 338, 399, 526
 Modifications 96, 341
 Moisture 516
 Molecular genetics 48
 Monitoring 10, 258, 331, 333, 374, 375, 481, 532
 Monitors 331, 469
 Monkeys 76, 85, 180, 228, 258, 310, 326, 414, 416, 461, 477,
 511
 Monodelphis domestica 217
 Mortality 93, 311, 365, 366, 382, 394, 425, 530
 Mosaicism 520
 Movements 374
 Multiple regression 478
 Municipal services 309
 Murinae 537
 Murine paramyxovirus 148, 270
 Mus 74
 Muscle fibers 54
 Muscular dystrophy 54
 Muskrats 351
 Mutants 54, 487, 489, 492
 Mutations 128, 489
 Mycoplasma 352
 Myobia musculi 162, 525
 Natural history 314, 416
 Natural light 150
 Natural mating 144
 Nature conservation 314
 Nematode control 325
 Neonatal mortality 2, 82, 156, 257
 Neonates 390
 Neoplasms 51, 97, 386, 500
 Nesting 504
 Newborn animals 76, 257, 382
 Nigeria 530
 Nocturnal activity 523
 Nomenclature 128
 Normal values 257, 431, 519
 Norway 308
 Nose 496
 Nuclear inclusions 488
 Nursing 475
 Nutrient deficiencies 185
 Nutrition 401
 Nutritional muscular dystrophy 2
 Nutritional state 53
 Nylon 363
 Obesity 540
 Occupational hazards 195, 236, 537
 Odocoileus Virginianus 63
 Operational control 103
 Opossums 217, 437
 Opportunistic infections 496
 Organizations 130, 396
 Organophosphorus compounds 371
 Outbreaks 95, 490, 530
 Ovulation 438
 Pain 36, 320
 Pancreas 358
 Papio 534
 Papio anubis 519
 Paraiba 217
 Paralysis 489
 Paramyxoviridae 423
 Parasites 392
 Parasitism 97
 Parliament 192
 Parous rates 463
 Participative management 253
 Parturition 275, 425
 Pasteurella multocida 212, 458
 Pathogen free animals 27, 188
 Pathogenesis 83, 172
 Pediculus 316
 Pedigree 441
 Pennsylvania 24
 Pens 46, 159, 225, 273
 Perches 59, 201
 Performance 382
 Periodicals 305
 Pernambuco 217
 Peromyscus 144
 Personnel 193, 236, 459
 Pest control 316
 Pesticides 455, 535
 Pharmacology 524
 Pharmacy 424
 Phenotypes 217, 259
 Philippines 106, 465
 Photoperiod 274, 376
 Physical laboratories 234
 Physiological effect 370
 Physiological functions 258, 324, 481
 Physiology 283, 331, 437
 Pig breeds 58
 Pig housing 96, 302, 303, 486
 Pigeons 264, 434
 Piglets 92, 501
 Pigs 12, 96, 127, 238, 302, 303, 472, 486, 497, 498
 Pines 151
 Plasmodium 372
 Plastics 281
 Platelets 381
 Play 447
 Plutonium 255
 Pneumocystis carinii 495
 Pollutants 196
 Pongidae 268, 477
 Population pressure 144
 Population structure 12
 Postmortem examinations 261, 382
 Postoperative complications 137
 Postpartum interval 463
 Poultry 11, 218, 455
 Poultry housing 202
 Poultry rearing 318
 Pounds 309
 Prealbumin 195
 Predation 211
 Pregnancy 343, 438
 Pregnancy diagnosis 527
 Preservation 30
 Prevention 82, 393
 Preweaning period 82
 Primates 8, 9, 32, 44, 45, 47, 57, 59, 61, 67, 137, 170, 171,
 173, 176, 178, 194, 203, 206, 245, 245, 252, 262, 287, 288,
 314, 319, 321, 328, 331, 360, 361, 362, 363, 390, 395, 396,
 398, 399, 405, 409, 412, 415, 417, 419, 441, 442, 479, 481,
 483, 491, 507, 532
 Primates as laboratory animals 245, 353, 360, 361, 534
 Progeny production 163
 Progesterone 407, 527
 Programs 167, 180
 Projects 106
 Prototypes 411
 Protozoal infections 116, 186, 350, 428
 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 516
 Psychological factors 170, 415, 483
 Psychology 245
 Psychoses 452
 Public health 95
 Public opinion 515
 Public relations 369, 459
 Publications 226
 Puppies 78
 Pups 504
 Q fever 418
 Quality controls 279
 Quantitative genetics 12, 526
 Quantitative traits 48, 441
 Quarantine 275, 351
 Queens 527
 Rabbit diseases 421
 Rabbit feeding 37, 284, 421
 Rabbit housing 155, 223, 250
 Rabbits 2, 4, 46, 65, 82, 101, 131, 159, 186, 187, 212, 223,
 224, 225, 250, 252, 267, 270, 284, 317, 343, 365, 382, 408,
 420, 421, 434, 443, 458, 478, 513, 516
 Rabbits as laboratory animals 422
 Radionuclides 255
 Ranges 464
 Rat feeding 98, 485
 Rats 29, 34, 43, 90, 111, 120, 128, 135, 139, 140, 141, 150,
 151, 165, 169, 193, 219, 252, 264, 266, 271, 285, 290, 291,
 330, 333, 334, 341, 352, 357, 358, 371, 384, 385, 387, 392,
 400, 446, 462, 468, 470, 471, 485, 489, 500, 504, 520, 529,
 539, 540
 Rats as laboratory animals 219
 Rats as laboratory animals, Effect of radiation 370
 Rattus 135
 Rearing techniques 125, 315
 Record keeping 60, 189
 Recordings 374
 Records 19, 208, 260, 367
 Rectum 500
 Reference standards 431
 Reflexes 101
 Regulation 535
 Regulations 21, 24, 47, 86, 153, 222, 260, 308, 389, 433, 536
 Reinfection 140, 271
 Relapse 428
 Relationships 380
 Relative humidity 100, 156, 157, 243, 448
 Remote control 331
 Removal 210
 Renal function 290
 Reproduction 73, 311, 321, 323, 326, 376, 394, 421, 436, 437,
 438, 494
 Reproductive behavior 138, 168, 362, 416
 Reproductive efficiency 70, 154
 Reproductive performance 113, 134, 144, 156, 163, 189, 323,
 348, 365, 439
 Reptiles 62
 Reptiles as laboratory animals 77
 Research 33, 432, 509
 Research institutes 72, 182, 440, 442, 459, 460
 Research policy 260
 Research projects 313, 440
 Research workers 508
 Respiration rate 101
 Respiratory diseases 266, 352, 462, 468, 513
 Responses 141
 Responsibility 474
 Restraint 283, 445
 Restraint of animals 3, 5, 8, 241, 303, 358, 378, 414, 498
 Retinas 150, 446
 Retroviridae 239
 Rhesus monkey 507
 Rhesus monkeys 3, 126, 133, 143, 175, 200, 272, 316, 372, 394,
 528
 Rhinitis 34
 Risk 535
 Rodents 55, 68, 97, 204, 211, 213, 243, 248, 280, 374, 464
 Rodents as laboratory animals 68, 450
 Saccharin 29
 Safety 101, 498
 Safety at work 410
 Safety measures 455, 455, 455, 455
 Saguinus oedipus 176, 397
 Saimiri 108, 257
 Saimiri sciureus 221
 Salmonella 278, 366
 Salmonella typhimurium 530
 Salmonellosis 278, 530
 Sampling 135, 481
 Sanitation 327
 Sarcoma 255
 Schistocerca gregaria 315
 Screening 165, 228, 377, 458
 Security 459, 460
 Selection 12
 Selection methods 244
 Semen characters 199, 461
 Sentinel animals 148
 Serological diagnosis 392, 423, 462
 Serological surveys 115, 267, 391, 458
 Serotypes 212
 Sewage 210
 Sex differences 59, 115, 195, 391, 431, 447, 464
 Sex ratio 311, 463
 Sexual behavior 146, 330, 362
 Sheep 418
 Sialodacryoadenitis virus 140, 165, 271
 Size 464
 Skeletal muscle 470
 Skills 474
 Skulls 317
 Small animal rearing 486
 Small intestine 172
 Social behavior 35, 170, 310, 337, 399, 416, 443, 452, 478,
 481, 511
 Social dominance 115
 Social emotional development 125
 Social environment 32, 198, 288, 337, 412, 476
 Social interaction 85, 108, 194, 273, 466, 479, 491
 Social status 113
 Social structure 477, 478
 Socialization 158, 413, 482
 Softwoods 371
 Sorting 499
 Sounds 243, 412
 Sources 391
 South asia 74
 Sows 58
 Space requirements 173, 223, 264, 273, 289, 306, 523
 Spatial distribution 523
 Species 57, 61
 Specific pathogen free state 187, 471
 Specific pathogen-free state 429
 Spinal cord 54
 Spine 89
 Spleen 147
 Squirrel monkeys 61, 91, 108, 214, 327, 407, 438
 Standards 21, 107, 230, 230, 230, 320
 Staphylococcus 496
 Staphylococcus aureus 332, 516
 Starvation 98
 Sterilization 404
 Sterilizing 256, 333
 Stimulation 470
 Stock accounting 424
 Stocks 19
 Stoppers 336
 Strain differences 290, 302, 490
 Strains 27, 30, 34, 111, 249, 285, 290, 385, 430, 439, 492,
 522
 Streptobacillus 490
 Streptococcus pneumoniae 266
 Streptomycin 212, 528
 Stress 4, 11, 41, 64, 142, 145, 147, 152, 203, 238, 275, 393,
 428, 472, 480, 484, 491, 498, 502
 Stress factors 185
 Structural design 18
 Superovulation 120
 Supervisors 166
 Supplementary feeding 499
 Supplies 282
 Supply 494
 Surgery 226
 Surgical operations 317, 320, 404
 Surveys 442
 Survival 156, 257, 382
 Susceptibility 490
 Sweden 186, 433
 Switzerland 104
 Sympathetic nervous system 378
 Symptoms 2, 36, 95, 221, 266, 473, 530
 Syphacia 291, 384
 Systems analysis 451
 Tail 448
 Teaching materials 509, 510
 Technical training 508
 Technicians 84, 474, 506, 508
 Techniques 215
 Teeth 137
 Telemetry 258
 Television 44
 Temperature 4
 Temperatures 243
 Temporal variation 217
 Terbufos 371
 Territoriality 502
 Testes 502
 Testing 92, 338, 381, 468
 Testosterone 380, 502
 Tetanus 503
 Tethered housing 481
 Tethering 358, 378
 Texas 251
 Therapy 372, 473
 Thymus gland 145
 Thyroid diseases 244
 Thyroid gland 434
 Time 29
 Tissues 86, 386
 Toads 56
 Toxicity 133, 141, 162, 255, 371
 Toxicology 180, 522
 Toys 161, 194, 201, 292, 363, 412, 447
 Trachea 276
 Training 167, 354, 506, 509
 Training (animal) 277, 511
 Training of animals 514
 Traits 237
 Transfers 30
 Transgenic animals 216
 Transgenics 406, 512
 Transplantation 386
 Transport 345
 Transport of animals 145, 147, 277, 498, 514
 Trapping 536
 Trauma 89
 Treatment 75, 97, 132, 503, 528
 Tremor 489
 Tropics 79, 79, 79
 Trucks 147
 Trypsin 120
 Tube feeding 357
 Tuberculosis 528
 Types 131
 Typhlitis 93
 U.S.A. 1, 21, 47, 69, 86, 87, 107, 153, 167, 206, 266, 282,
 295, 389, 392, 442, 453, 474, 484, 494, 515
 Ultrasound 183, 519
 United Kingdom 13, 103, 229, 293, 313, 402, 494, 505
 United States 25
 Uranium 141, 255
 Urea 502
 Urinary tract diseases 522
 Urine 113
 Usage 59, 535
 Usda 21, 206, 389
 Uterus 530
 Vaccination 212
 Vaginal prolapse 408
 Validity 338, 339
 Values 84
 Vandalism 457
 Vapor 154
 Ventilation 121, 157, 196, 213, 243
 Veterinarians 229, 508
 Veterinary disinfection 455
 Veterinary education 508
 Veterinary equipment 404
 Veterinary hygiene 402
 Veterinary medicine 302
 Veterinary practice 80
 Veterinary services 1, 28, 252
 Veterinary surgery 322
 Videorecordings 176, 176, 176, 176, 176, 176
 Viral diseases 109, 140, 532
 Viral hepatitis 148, 164, 197, 429, 488, 525
 Virginia 95
 Virology 318
 Viruses 95, 392, 462, 532
 Visual aids 533
 Visual stimuli 412
 Vitamin deficiencies 473
 Vitamin e 2
 Vitamin supplements 473
 Vocalization 113, 272
 Washington 396, 486
 Water troughs 524
 Weight 64
 Weight determination 499
 Weight gain 274
 Wild strains 74
 Wildlife conservation 456
 Wildlife management 536
 Wire 522
 Wisconsin 182, 493
 Wood chips 151
 Wood shavings 151, 279
 Work organization 84
 Workers 509
 Wounds 43
 Xenopus laevis 299
 Young animal diseases 390
 Young animals 317
 Zoo animals 80
 Zoological gardens 57
 Zoonoses 53, 109, 301, 344, 418
 


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http://www.nal.usda.gov/awic/pubs/oldbib/qb9517.htm, April 17, 1998